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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Non-Olympian ▸ Other GodsView Options:  |  |  | 

Other Gods

Julia Domna, Augusta, 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Julia Domna and her children as Terra and the Four Seasons! "The flatterers of Julia Domna pretended that all things were owing to her. The star-besprinkled globe represents the Roman world, which with her husband Septimius Severus she governed; and to the empire of which she destines her two sons, Caracalla and Geta, who, together with as many daughters, are the proof of her fecundity." -- Rasche, T. ii pl l p 932.
RS85789. Silver denarius, RIC IV S549 (R), RSC III 35, BMCRE V S21, Hunter III S22, SRCV II 6579, F, well centered, slightly rough with light even corrosion, edge cracks, weight 2.369 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 207 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, bun at back of head; reverse FECVNDITAS (fertility), Terra reclining left under a vine, nude to the waist, right hand set on globe spangled with stars, leaning on left arm on basket of fruits, in background four children representing the four seasons; rare; $200.00 (170.00)


Kaunos, Caria, c. 197 - 191 B.C. (or Later 2nd Century)

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On the Rosetta Stone, "The Memphis Decree" announces Ptolemy V's rule and ascension to godhood, and describes him as "like Horus." In "A Statue of a Hellenistic King," Journal of Hellenistic Studies, 33 (1913), C. Edgar attributes a statue very similar to the reverse figure to Ptolemy V: "[The statue] stands with right foot drawn back, the toes alone resting on the ground...His head is held erect and his gaze is turned slightly to his right. His shoulders are drawn up a little...[the upper part] unnaturally short in proportion to the lower part of the trunk...[The missing right] forearm was clear of the body. The [missing] left hand was raised and probably rested on a spear." We believe this type is from the among the last issues of Kaunos under Ptolemaic rule, struck after the 13 year old Ptolemy V came of age in 197/6 B.C., perhaps to commemorate his accession, and before he sold the city to the Rhodians for 200 talents of silver in 191 B.C.
GB87087. Bronze AE 16, SNGvA 8103; Lindgren III 425; Imhoof-Blumer KM I, p. 138, 1; BMC Caria -; SNG Cop -; SNG Keckman -; SNG Mnchen -, VF, green patina, well centered on a tight flan, a little porous/rough, tiny edge crack, weight 2.166 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 0o, Kaunos mint, c. 197 - 191 B.C. (or later 2nd century); obverse diademed and horned head of Alexander the Great right; reverse youth (Ptolemy V as Horus?) advancing right, nude, long lotus-tipped scepter transverse in left hand, right arm and index finger extended, snake before him coiled around scepter, K-AY (Kaunos) divided high across field, ΣΩ-TAΣ (magistrate) divided across center; very rare; $180.00 (153.00)


Roman Republic, Dictatorship of Julius Caesar, C. Antius C. f. Restio, 47 B.C.

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Issued during Caesar's dictatorship. The Herakles reverse relates to the supposed descent of the Antia gens from Antiades, son of Hercules and Aglaia. The trophy is not one of Hercules normal attributes and may refer to Caesar's military exploits. Antius Restio was proscribed by the triumval government in 43 B.C. and fled to Sicily and the protection of Sextus Pompey.
RR87658. Silver denarius, Crawford 455/2a, RSC I Antia 2, Sydenham 971, Sear CRI 35, BMCRE Rome 4032, RBW Collection 1594, SRCV I 435, VF/F, toned, bumps and scratches, corrosion, slightly off center, weight 3.566 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 47 B.C.; obverse DEI PENATES, jugate heads of Dei Penates right; reverse CANTIVSCF, Hercules walking left, nude, raising club in right, trophy in left, Nemean lion skin over left arm; scarce; $180.00 (153.00)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Philadelphia, Decapolis, Syria

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In Greek mythology, Asteria (Greek: "Aστερια, "of the stars, starry one") is the Titan goddess of nocturnal oracles and falling stars. She is the daughter of the Titans Coeus (Polus) and Phoebe and the sister of Leto. Asteria is the mother of Hecate, the goddess of witchcraft and, in one account, the mother of Heracles. Asteria lived on Olympus, and like her sister Leto was beloved by Zeus. When Zeus pursued her in the form of an eagle, to escape his amorous advances, she transformed herself into a quail (ortux), flung herself into the Aegean Sea, and metamorphosed into the island Ortygia (quail island). In another version, after Asteria jumped into the sea, Poseidon pursued her. To escape him she transformed herself into the desert island of Delos.
RP86849. Bronze AE 19, RPC IV online 6648.3 (same dies, 6 spec.); SNG ANS 1395 (same dies); Sofaer 34 (same dies); Rosenberger IV 35; BMC Arabia, p. 40, 17; Spijkerman 32, VF, centered on a tight flan, a little rough, porous, edge cracks, weight 7.549 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Philadelphia (Amman, Jordan) mint, as caesar, c. 175 A.D.; obverse Λ AYP KOMMO∆OC KAIC, bare headed and draped bust right; reverse ΦIΛ K CY ΘEA ACTEPIA, draped and veiled bust of Asteria, star above; ; rare; $100.00 (85.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C.

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Antiochus IV took the name "Epiphanes," meaning "Select of God." His subjects made a pun on his name, calling him "Epimanes" or "madman." In 168 B.C., Antiochus IV ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. The Temple in Jerusalem was seized and dedicated to Zeus. The Jews revolted and after three years of fighting, Judah Maccabee defeated the Seleukid army. Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, commemorates the rededication of the Temple in 165 B.C. According to the Talmud, there was only enough consecrated olive oil to fuel the eternal flame in the Temple for one day. Miraculously, the oil burned for eight days, enough time to prepare and consecrate fresh oil.
GY87384. Bronze dichalkon, Houghton-Lorber 1509, SNG Spaer 1204, BMC Seleucid 24, Newel ESM p. 272, Houghton CSE 984, Hoover Seleukid 637 (R2), F, brown tone, light corrosion, edge crack, weight 8.286 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, Seleucia on the Tigris (south of Baghdad, Iraq) mint, c. 173 - 164 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Antiochos IV right, B over X (mark of value = dichalkon) lower left, fillet border; reverse goddess Nicephorus seated left on high backed throne, wearing polos, Nike in extended right hand, long beaked bird left at feet, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ANTIOXOY downward on left; rare; $80.00 (68.00)


Lix, Mauretania, North Africa, c. 50 - 1 B.C.

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Ancient Lixus is located within modern Larache, on the right bank of Loukkos River the about three km inland from the Atlantic ocean. Lixus was first settled by the Phoenicians in the 7th century B.C. and was later annexed by Carthage. When Carthage fell to Rome, Lixus became an imperial outpost of the Roman province Mauretania Tingitana. Among the ruins, there are Roman baths, temples, 4th-century walls, a mosaic floor, a Christian church and the intricate remains of the Capitol Hill.
GB84541. Bronze AE 18, Alexandropoulos MAA 168, Mazard 633, SNG Cop 694, SGCV II 6643, Fair, rough, scratches, weight 5.653 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Lixus (Larache, Morocco) mint, c. 50 - 1 B.C.; obverse head of Chusor-Phtah right, wearing pointed cap with long tassel; reverse bunch of grapes, neo-Punic inscription: MPM - LKS divided across field; ex RBW collection; rare; $50.00 (42.50)







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Catalog current as of Monday, November 12, 2018.
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Other Gods