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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Good Luck||View Options:  |  |  |   

Luck (Forutuna)

The Romans believed that Fortuna after deserting the Persians and Assyrians took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Egypt and into Syria. At last arriving on Mount Palatine she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel, entered Rome where she took up her abode forever. Fortuna distributed good and evil among mankind according to her caprice and without any regard to merit. Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars - redux means "coming back" or "returning."


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D.

|Trajan| |Decius|, |Trajan| |Decius,| |July| |249| |-| |First| |Half| |of| |June| |251| |A.D.|, |double| |sestertius|
The rare double sestertius denomination, distinguished by its radiate crown, was introduced with this issue. The denomination was also issued by Gallienus and especially by Postumus.

Trajan Decius, a general under Philip I, was sent to crush the revolt of Pacatian but was forced by his troops to declare himself emperor. He defeated Philip in a great battle at Verona. Decius spent the rest of his short reign combating barbarians. In June 251, Trajan Decius and his son Herennius Etruscus became the first Roman emperors to die in battle against a foreign enemy.
SH94035. Orichalcum double sestertius, RIC IV 115(a) (R), Hunter III 42, Cohen V 39, SRCV III 9395, NGC XF, strike 5/5, surface 2/5, removed from NGC holder, flaws on obverse, edge crack, weight 34.843 g, maximum diameter 35.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 249 - 251 A.D.; obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder (as normal for similar busts, not described in references except in Hunter); reverse FELICITAS SAECVLI (era of good fortune), Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, grounded long caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking at center; ex Pegasi sale 154 (21 Aug 2018), lot 425 ($2950 on tag, $2500 estimate, unsold), big 35 mm DOUBLE Sestertius!; rare; $1260.00 SALE |PRICE| $1134.00


Aelius, Caesar, July or August 136 - 1 January 138 A.D.

|Aelius|, |Aelius,| |Caesar,| |July| |or| |August| |136| |-| |1| |January| |138| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS92435. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 2634, RSC II 50, BMCRE III Hadrian 969, SRCV II 3973, Strack II 391, Hunter II 2, F, attractive portrait, nice toning, well centered on a tight flan, light scratches, flan edge a little ragged with small edge splits, weight 3.091 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 137 A.D.; obverse L AELIVS CAESAR, bare head right; reverse TR POT COS II, Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, caduceus in left hand, cornucopia in right hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $240.00 SALE |PRICE| $216.00


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Bonus Eventus, the god of good outcomes, was originally worshiped by the Romans as a deity especially presiding over agriculture and successful harvests. During the Imperial era, he was associated with other types of success. The epithet Bonus, "the Good," is used with other abstract deities such as Bona Fortuna ("Good Fortune"), Bona Mens ("Good Thinking" or "Sound Mind"), and Bona Spes ("Good Hope," perhaps to be translated as "optimism"), as well as with the mysterious and multivalent Bona Dea, a goddess whose rites were celebrated by women.
RS92309. Silver denarius, RIC IV 369; RSC III 68; BMCRE V p. 91, 343; SRCV II 6267; Hunter III 176 var. (IMP CE L..), Choice gVF, well centered and struck, toned, edge cracks, weight 3.208 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse BONI EVENTVS, Bonus Eventus standing slightly left, head left, raising a shallow basket of fruit in right hand, two heads of grain downward in left; $160.00 SALE |PRICE| $144.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS94106. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 207, RSC II 601, BMCRE III 268, Hunter II 95, Strack II 63, SRCV II 3487, VF, nice bust, well centered on a tight flan, flow lines, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.422 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 119 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right with bare-chest, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse P M TR P COS III, Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, FELIC - AVG divided across field; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 82 (6 Oct 2019), part of lot 1070; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00 ON RESERVE


Aurelian, August or September 270 - October or November 275 A.D.

|Aurelian|, |Aurelian,| |August| |or| |September| |270| |-| |October| |or| |November| |275| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars - redux means "coming back" or "returning." She may be one of the later aspects of Fortuna, as the earliest mention of her is on an altar dedicated by the Senate in 19 B.C. for the safe return of Emperor Augustus.
RA91227. Billon antoninianus, SRCV III 11539, Cohen VI 82, Hunter IV - (p. cx), VF, desert patina, oval flan, small edge split, weight 3.330 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Milan(?) mint, c. 270 - 271 A.D.; obverse IMP AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse FORTVNA REDVX, Fortuna seated left on wheel, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, exergue off flan; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 76 (7 April 2019), part of lot 942; $95.00 SALE |PRICE| $85.50


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

|Trajan|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.|, |as|
At the time this coin was struck, the Via Traiana was constructed at the emperor Trajan's personal expense; the road connected Benton with Brundisium (Brindisi).
RB91567. Copper as, Woytek 331bD, BMCRE III 797, BnF IV 622, RIC II 500, Strack I 399, SRCV II -, aVF, a little bit rough, bumps and corrosion, weight 11.790 g, maximum diameter 28.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 108 - 110 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder; reverse S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Fortuna standing left, rudder held by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, galley prow in background on left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across the field below center; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS92479. Silver denarius, RIC IV S551; RSC III 47; BMCRE V p. 160, S22; SRCV II 6581; Hunter III S24, Choice VF/F, nice portrait, well centered, toned, flow lines, light marks and scratches, small edge splits, weight 3.250 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 206 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bare-headed bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, flat coil at back of head; reverse FELICITAS, Felicitas standing left, caduceus in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

|Gordian| |I|, |Gordian| |III,| |29| |July| |238| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS92620. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 142, RSC IV 81, Hunter III 49, SRCV III 8608, Choice gVF, well centered, nice portrait, old collection toning, flow lines, tiny edge cracks, weight 4.390 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 243 - 244 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse FELICITAS TEMPORVM (happy times), Felicitas standing facing, head left, long caduceus vertical in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00 ON RESERVE


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

|Gordian| |III|, |Gordian| |III,| |29| |July| |238| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
This coin was issued to gain the support of Fortuna toward ensuring the safe return of Gordian from his campaign against the Persians. But Fortuna was not inspired. Gordian would never return to Rome. Shapur's inscription at Naqsh-i Rustam claims he was killed in a Roman defeat at the Battle of Misiche near modern Fallujah. Roman sources do not mention this defeat and claim Philip, who succeeded Gordian as emperor, murdered him.
RS92616. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 143, RSC IV 97, SRCV III 8612, Hunter III - (p. lxxxv), VF, old collection toning, flow lines, small deposits, scratches and marks, flan ragged with edge splits, reverse a little off center, weight 3.982 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 242 - 244 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse FORT REDVX, Fortuna seated left, rudder held by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, wheel below seat; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $45.00 SALE |PRICE| $40.50


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

|Probus|, |Probus,| |Summer| |276| |-| |September| |282| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
In 280, Proculus, a Roman usurper, started a rebellion at Lugdunum (Lyon, France) and proclaimed himself emperor. Probus suppressed the revolt and Proculus was executed.
RA47769. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V-2 104, Bastien IX 269, aMS, full silvering, excellent centering, weight 3.473 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, obverse IMP C PROBVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse TEMPOR FELICI (time of good fortune), Felicitas standing right, long caduceus in right hand, cornucopia inwardly in left hand, I in exergue; $40.00 SALE |PRICE| $36.00




  



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