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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Personifications ▸ Good LuckView Options:  |  |  |   

Luck (Forutuna)

The Romans believed that Fortuna after deserting the Persians and Assyrians took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Egypt and into Syria. At last arriving on Mount Palatine she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel, entered Rome where she took up her abode forever. Fortuna distributed good and evil among mankind according to her caprice and without any regard to merit. Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars - redux means "coming back" or "returning."


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

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Felicitas was the goddess or personification of good luck and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS75697. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 75A (R); RSC IV 130, SRCV III 8945, Hunter III -, EF, superb strike with sharp dies, nice metal, weight 4.966 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 247 - 248 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M TR P IIII COS P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power for four years, consul, father of the country), Felicitas standing left, long caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $315.00 SALE PRICE $284.00


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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The obverse and reverse legends and types are known from the London mint with MLXXI in the exergue and B - E across the reverse field (RIC V 31, Web Carausius 34). This variety, without marks and perhaps unofficial, is unpublished in the many references examined by Forum. We also could not find an example online. This is the only example known to Forum.
RA73246. Billon antoninianus, Apparently unpublished, RIC V -, Webb Carausius -, Casey -, Hunter -, SRCV IV -, King Unmarked -, Burton Latimer -, et al., aVF, green patina, broad flan, crude, light marks, weight 3.624 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain mint, obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse FELICITAS AVG (the good fortune of the Emperor), Felicitas standing facing, head left, long caduceus vertical in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; possibly unique!; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of good luck and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RB83480. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 150a, Cohen V 138, Hunter III - (p. lxxxvii), SRCV III 9005, gVF, superb portrait, centered on a tight squared flan, green encrustations, weight 17.859 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 247 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M TR P IIII COS II P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power for 4 years, consul 2 times, father of the country), Felicitas standing half left, long caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of good luck and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RB84935. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 169a, Hunter III 61, Cohen V 44, SRCV III 8992, VF, well centered, nice green patina, scratches, slightly rough, weight 18.348 g, maximum diameter 29.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 245 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse FELICITAS TEMP (happy times), Felicitas standing facing, head left, long caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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Bonus Eventus, the god of good outcomes, was originally worshiped by the Romans as a deity especially presiding over agriculture and successful harvests. During the Imperial era, he was associated with other types of success. The epithet Bonus, "the Good," is used with other abstract deities such as Bona Fortuna ("Good Fortune"), Bona Mens ("Good Thinking" or "Sound Mind"), and Bona Spes ("Good Hope," perhaps to be translated as "optimism"), as well as with the mysterious and multivalent Bona Dea, a goddess whose rites were celebrated by women.
RS76958. Silver denarius, SRCV II 6267, RIC IV 369, RSC III 68, BMCRE V 343, VF, excellent eastern style portrait, some light corrosion, weight 2.130 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse BONI EVENTVS, Bonus Eventus standing left, basket of fruit in right, two heads of grain in left; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

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The Romans believed that Fortuna, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Egypt and into Syria. At last arriving on Mount Palatine, she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel, entered Rome where she took up her abode forever.
RB73737. Copper as, RIC II, part 1, 545; BnF III 430; Cohen I 126; BMCRE II 401 var. (no aegis); Hunter I 152 var. (same); cf. SRCV I 2805 (COS XIIII), F, centered, green patina, scratches, corrosion, weight 9.523 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 87 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XIII CENS PER P P, laureate bust right, wearing aegis; reverse FORTVNAE AVGVSTI, Fortune standing left, grounded rudder held by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field below center; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.50


Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D.

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On 28 October 97 A.D. Nerva recalled his general Marcus Ulpius Trajanus, age 44, from the German frontier and was forced by the Praetorian Guard to adopt him as his successor.
RB55449. Copper as, RIC II 83, BMCRE III 130, Cohen II 68, F, scratches, weight 10.666 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse FORTVNA AVGVST (good fortune of the Emperor), Fortuna standing left, rudder held by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

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Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars - redux means "coming back" or "returning." She may be one of the later aspects of Fortuna, as the earliest mention of her is on an altar dedicated by the Senate in 19 B.C. for the safe return of Emperor Augustus.
RA84443. Billon antoninianus, GŲbl MIR 1350f, RSC IV 281, Hunter IV S178, RIC V S483, SRCV III 10218, VF, weight 2.604 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 135o, 2nd officina, Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, c. 266 A.D.; obverse IMP GALLIENVS AVG, radiate bust right, drapery on left shoulder; reverse FORT REDVX, Fortuna seated left, holding rudder on globe by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, MS in exergue; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Bonus Eventus, the god of good outcomes, was originally worshiped by the Romans as a deity especially presiding over agriculture and successful harvests. During the Imperial era, he was associated with other types of success. The epithet Bonus, "the Good," is used with other abstract deities such as Bona Fortuna ("Good Fortune"), Bona Mens ("Good Thinking" or "Sound Mind"), and Bona Spes ("Good Hope," perhaps to be translated as "optimism"), as well as with the mysterious and multivalent Bona Dea, a goddess whose rites were celebrated by women.
RB90464. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 743 (S); BMCRE V p. 154, 621; Cohen IV 441; SRCV II 6425, F, tight flan, weight 20.648 g, maximum diameter 28.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 197 - 198 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP X, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P V COS II P P, Genius (or Bonus Eventus) standing slightly left, sacrificing out of patera in right hand over flaming and garlanded altar on left, two stalks of grain downwards in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; rare; $75.00 SALE PRICE $67.50


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 280, Proculus, a Roman usurper, started a rebellion at Lugdunum (Lyon, France) and proclaimed himself emperor. Probus suppressed the revolt and Proculus was executed.
RA47769. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 104, Bastien IX 269, aMS, weight 3.473 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, obverse IMP C PROBVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse TEMPOR FELICI (time of good fortune), Felicitas standing right holding long caduceus in right and cornucopia inwardly in left, I in exergue; full, solid silvering; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00




  



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