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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Twelve Caesars| ▸ |Titus||View Options:  |  |  | 

Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D.

Titus Flavius Vespasianus was the hero of the Judean rebellion (from the Roman perspective) and a very popular emperor. He presided over the empire during the cataclysmic eruption of Vesuvius, which buried half the towns of the Bay of Naples, including Pompeii. He was described as handsome, charming and generous. Titus once complained that he had lost a day because twenty-four hours passed without his bestowing a gift. He was, however, generous to a fault, which depleted the treasury. If he had ruled longer, he might have brought the empire to bankruptcy and lost his popularity. He died of illness in 81 A.D., succeeded by his brother Domitian.

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia, Titus Reverse

|Cappadocia|, |Vespasian,| |1| |July| |69| |-| |24| |June| |79| |A.D.,| |Caesarea,| |Cappadocia,| |Titus| |Reverse||didrachm|NEW
Kayseri, originally called Mazaka or Mazaca, is in central Turkey on a low spur on the north side of Mount Erciyes (Mount Argaeus in ancient times). During Achaemenid Persian rule, it was the capital of a Satrapy on the crossroads of the Royal Road from Sardis to Susa and the trade route from Sinope to the Euphrates. It was conquered by Alexander's general Perdikkas, was ruled by Eumenes of Cardia, then passed to the Seleucid empire after the battle of Ipsus. It became the capital of the independent Cappadocian Kingdom under Ariarathes III, around 250 B.C. During Strabo's time it was also known as Eusebia, after the Cappadocian King Ariarathes V Eusebes, 163 – 130 B.C. The name was changed again to "Caesarea in Cappadocia" in honor of Caesar Augustus, upon his death in 14 A.D. The city passed under formal Roman rule in 17 A.D. In Roman times, it prospered on the route from Ephesus to the East. Caesarea was destroyed by the Sassanid King Shapur I after his victory over the Emperor Valerian I in 260 A.D. At the time it was recorded to have around 400,000 inhabitants. Arabic influence changed Caesarea to the modern name Kayseri. The city gradually recovered and has a population of almost 1 million people today. Few traces of the ancient city survive.
RP96735. Silver didrachm, RPC II 1650, Sydenham Caesarea 102, Metcalf Cappadocia 4, SNG Righetti 1761, VF, excellent portraits, flow lines, light deposits, light marks, reverse off center, weight 6.429 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, 76 - 77 A.D.; obverse AYTOKPA KAICAP OYECΠACIANOC CEBACTOC, laureate bust of Vespasian right; reverse AYTO KAI OYECΠACIANOC CEBACTOY YIOC, laureate bust of Titus right; $600.00 (€552.00)
 


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D., Caesarea, Judaea, Judea Capta

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Titus,| |24| |June| |79| |-| |13| |September| |81| |A.D.,| |Caesarea,| |Judaea,| |Judea| |Capta||AE| |22|
This Judaea Capta type was minted at Caesarea Maritima, Judaea. After Herod's death, Caesarea was the seat of the Roman procurator and capital of Roman Palestine for about 500 years. A riot in 66 A.D. between Syrians and Jews in the city led to the First Jewish Revolt. Paul was delivered to Caesarea when his life was threatened in Jerusalem (Acts 9:30). From Caesarea, Paul departed to Tarsus, his birthplace. Paul met the church in Caesarea (Acts 18:22; 21:8,16). Finally, Paul was taken prisoner (Acts 23:23,33) and returned to Caesarea where he was tried before Festus and King Agrippa (Acts 25:1-4; 24:6-13)
JD97374. Bronze AE 22, Hendin 1446, RPC II 2311, SNG ANS 466, Meshorer TJC 381a, F, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, a little off center, rough areas, weight 9.861 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Maritima mint, as caesar, 71 - 73 A.D.; obverse AYTOKP TITOC KAICAP, laureate head right; reverse IOY∆AIAΣ EAΛWKYIAΣ (Greek: Judaea Captured), Nike (Victory) standing right, nude to waist, left foot on helmet, writing on a shield hung on a palm tree; ex Naville Numismatics; $150.00 (€138.00)
 


Vespasian and Titus, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Vespasian| |and| |Titus,| |1| |July| |69| |-| |24| |June| |79| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||tetradrachm|
Vespasian was in Alexandria in the year this coin was struck. The Roman troops in Alexandria proclaimed Vespasian emperor on 1 July 69 A.D. When Vespasian heard the news, he was in Judaea. He left first for Syria and then to Egypt. The date of his arrival in Egypt is uncertain but he was in Alexandria when he learned of Vitellius death. Events in Egypt were staged and documented to draw parallels between the new emperor and Alexander the Great. Following in the footsteps of Alexander the Great 400 years earlier, he consulted oracles, entering the temple alone as Alexander did (Vespasian into the Temple of Serapis because under Ptolemy the oracles of Serapis had replaced the oracles of Ammon). He was acclaimed "God Caesar" and "Son of Ammon."
SH29276. Silver tetradrachm, RPC Online II 2416 (8 spec.); Geissen 279; Dattari 345; Milne 401; BMC Alexandria p. 28, 223; Emmett 207/2 (R1), gVF, nice portraits, a little off center, weight 11.066 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 69 - 28 Aug 70 A.D.; obverse AYTOKPAT KAIΣA OYEΣΠAΣIANOY, laureate head of Vespasian right, LB (year 2) lower right; reverse T ΦΛAYI OYEΣPAΣIANOΣ KAIΣ, laureate head of Titus right; SOLD







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|OBVERSE |LEGENDS

DIVOTITO
IMPERATORTCAESARAVGVSTIF
IMPTCAESARCOSIII
IMPTCAESARVESPASIANVSAVG
IMPTCAESVESPASIANAVGPM
IMPTCAESVESPAVGPMTRPCOSVIII
IMPTCAESVESPAVGPMTRPPPCOSVIII
IMPTITVSCAESVESPASIANAVGPM
IMPTITVSCAEVESPASIANVSAVGPM
IMPTVESPAVGCOSVIII
TCAESARIMPCOSIIICENS
TCAESARIMPCOSIIII
TCAESARIMPVESP
TCAESARIMPVESPASIAN
TCAESARIMPVESPASIANVS
TCAESARIMPVESPASIANVSCOSIII
TCAESARIMPVESPASIANVSCOSVI
TCAESARVESPASIANVS
TCAESIMP
TCAESIMPAVGFTRPCOSVICENSOR
TCAESIMPPONTRPCOSIICENS
TCAESIMPVESPCEN
TCAESIMPVESPCENS
TCAESIMPVESPPONTRPOT
TCAESIMPVESPPONTRPCENS
TCAESVESPASIANIMPPONTRPOTCOSIIICENS
TCAESVESPASIANIMPPTRPCOSII


REFERENCES|

American Numismatic Society (ANS) Collections Database Online - http://numismatics.org/search/search
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Burnett, A. & M. Amandry. Roman Provincial Coinage II: From Vespasian to Domitian (AD 69-96). (London, 1999).
Butcher, Kevin. Coinage in Roman Syria: Northern Syria, 64 BC - AD 253. Royal Numismatic Society Special Publication 34. (London, 2004).
Calicó, E. Xavier. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Carradice, I.A. & T.V. Buttrey. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II, Part 1: From AD 69 to 96. (London, 2007).
Cayón, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. I: De Pompeyo Magno a Matidia (Del 81 a.C. al 117 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Giard, J-B. Le monnayage de l'atelier de Lyon, De Claude Ier à Vespasien (41-78 après J.-C.), et au temps de Clodius Albinus (196-197 après J.-C.). (Wetteren, 2000).
Giard, Jean-Baptiste. Monnaies de l'Empire romain, III Du soulèvement de 68 après J.-C. a Nerva. Catalogue Bibliothèque nationale de France. (Paris, 1998).
Hendin, D. Guide to Biblical Coins, 5th Edition. (Amphora, 2010).
Mattingly, H. & R.A.G. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 2: Vespasian to Domitian. (London, 1930).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. I. Augustus to Nerva. (Oxford, 1962).
Seaby, H.A. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, The Millennium Edition, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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