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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Pamphylia| ▸ |Aspendos||View Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Greek Coins of Aspendos, Pamphylia

Aspendos is about 40 km east of Antalya, Turkey about 16 km inland on the Eurymedon River. In 546 B.C. it fell to Persia. After a Persian defeat in 467, the city joined the Attic-Delos Maritime League. Persia took it again in 411 B.C., Alexander in 333 B.C., and Rome in 190 B.C. Although often subject to powerful empires, the city usually retained substantial autonomy. The astonishing abundance of the silver money of Aspendos is a proof of the commercial importance of the town; and the number of countermarks and barbarous imitations shows that it circulated widely in the region.

Aspendos, Pamphylia, 333 - 250 B.C.

|Aspendos|, |Aspendos,| |Pamphylia,| |333| |-| |250| |B.C.|, |stater|
After Alexander took Perga peacefully, Aspendos sent envoys to offer surrender if he would not take the taxes and horses formerly paid as tribute to the Persian king. Agreeing, Alexander went on to Side, leaving a garrison behind. When he learned they had failed to ratify the agreement their own envoys had proposed, Alexander marched to the city. The Aspendians retreated to their acropolis and again sent envoys to sue for peace. This time, however, they had to agree to harsh terms - they would host a Macedonian garrison and pay 100 gold talents and 4,000 horses annually.

This type is a late example and likely among the last of the wrestler and slinger staters. Struck during economic crisis, perhaps resulting from the harsh terms set by Alexander after their treachery, the flans are underweight, crudely cast and appear to be of debased silver. The wrestlers and slinger are carelessly depicted. It is not as attractive as earlier examples but it is certainly much scarcer.
GS95992. Silver stater, Tekin Series 5, SNGvA 4576, SNG BnF 122, SNG Cop 240, Arslan-Lightfoot -, Choice gVF, attractive style, toned, obverse edge beveled, edge cracks, weight 10.440 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 0o, Aspendos mint, 333 - 250 B.C.; obverse two wrestlers grappling, nude, wrestler on left holds the right wrist of his opponent with his right hand and right forearm with his left hand, E between their legs, tiny die break on right, beveled edge; reverse slinger, wearing short chiton, discharging sling to right, EΣTFE∆IY upward behind, O between legs, clockwise triskeles of human legs above club on right, round border of dots; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $900.00 SALE |PRICE| $810.00


Aspendos, Pamphylia, 370 - 333 B.C.

|Aspendos|, |Aspendos,| |Pamphylia,| |370| |-| |333| |B.C.|, |stater|
The countermark appears to be a Hoplite advancing right with sword in right and round shield in left, in oval incuse. The hoplite represents the soldiery for which Aspendus was famous. The astonishing abundance of the silver money of Aspendus is a proof of the commercial importance of the town; and the number of countermarks and barbarous imitations shows that it circulated widely in the region.22.6
SH95389. Silver stater, Arslan-Lightfoot 39; SNGvA 4561; Tekin Series 4, 11; SNG BnF 84; SNG Cop 231; SNG Berry 1224 (all same obv die), VF, typical slightly flat strike, attractive, rainbow toning, weight 10.855 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Aspendos mint, 370 - 333 B.C.; obverse two wrestlers, the left one holds the wrist of his opponent with his right and right forearm with his left hand, AK between their legs; reverse slinger, wearing short chiton, discharging sling to right, triskeles on right with feet clockwise, EΣTΦE∆IIYΣ upward on left, countermark lower right: lion head right in a round 3.6mm punch; ex Forum (2011); $750.00 SALE |PRICE| $675.00


Aspendos, Pamphylia, 380 - 325 B.C.

|Aspendos|, |Aspendos,| |Pamphylia,| |380| |-| |325| |B.C.|, |stater|
In 333 B.C., after Alexander took Perga peacefully, Aspendos sent envoys to offer surrender if he would not take the taxes and horses formerly paid as tribute to the Persian king. Agreeing, Alexander went on to Side, leaving a garrison behind. When he learned they had failed to ratify the agreement their own envoys had proposed, Alexander marched to the city. The Aspendians retreated to their acropolis and again sent envoys to sue for peace. This time, however, they had to agree to harsh terms - they would host a Macedonian garrison and pay 100 gold talents and 4,000 horses annually.
GS94267. Silver stater, Tekin Series 4; SNG BnF -; SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Lockett -, BMC Lycia -, VF, nice style, a little off center, light marks, mild die wear, small edge crack, weight 10.747 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 0o, Aspendos mint, 380 - 325 B.C.; obverse two wrestlers, the left one holds the wrist of his opponent with his right hand and right forearm with his left hand, BI between their legs; reverse EΣTΦE∆IIYΣ upward on left, slinger, wearing short chiton, discharging sling to right, triskeles on right with feet clockwise, in square of dots, no trace of incuse; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 81 (1 Sep 2019), lot 203; missing from published major collections; very rare; $550.00 SALE |PRICE| $495.00 ON RESERVE


Aspendos, Pamphylia, 380 - 325 B.C.

|Aspendos|, |Aspendos,| |Pamphylia,| |380| |-| |325| |B.C.|, |stater|
Aspendos has the best-preserved theater of antiquity, with seating for 7,000. It was built in 155, during the rule of Marcus Aurelius, by the Greek architect Zenon, a native of the city. The Seljuqs used it as a caravansary and in the 13th century converted the stage building into a palace. Until recently the theater was still used for concerts, festivals and events, but shows are no longer allowed due to damage caused by modern theatrical equipment. A new facility has been constructed nearby to continue the tradition of open air theater in Aspendos.
GS94491. Silver stater, Tekin Series 4 (neither AΣ nor AI listed); SNG Cop 230; SNGvA 4567; SNG BnF 86; BMC Lycia p. 97, 30; Arslan-Lightfoot -, VF, attractive iridescent toning, broad flan, light marks, die wear, weight 10.792 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, die axis 0o, Aspendos mint, 380 - 325 B.C.; obverse two wrestlers, the left one holds the wrist of his opponent with his right and right forearm with his left hand, AΣ (nearly appearing as AI) between their legs; reverse slinger, wearing short chiton, discharging sling to right, triskeles on right with feet counterclockwise, EΣTΦE∆IIYΣ upward on left, all within a square of dots, no trace of incuse; from an Israeli collection; $580.00 SALE |PRICE| $460.00


Aspendos, Pamphylia, c. 465 - 420 B.C.

|Aspendos|, |Aspendos,| |Pamphylia,| |c.| |465| |-| |420| |B.C.|, |stater|
In 467 B.C. the Athenian statesman and military commander Cimon, and his fleet of 200 ships, destroyed the Persian navy based at the mouth of the river Eurymedon in a surprise attack. In order to crush to Persian land forces, he tricked the Persians by sending his best fighters ashore wearing the garments of the hostages he had seized earlier. When they saw these men, the Persians thought that they were compatriots freed by the enemy and arranged festivities in celebration. Taking advantage of this, Cimon landed and annihilated the Persians. Aspendos then became a member of the Attic-Delos Maritime league.
GS94449. Silver stater, SNG BnF 6; cf. SNGvA 4482 (ethnic arrangement), BMC Lycia -, SNG Cop -, SNG PfPs -, VF, struck with worn dies, oval generally favoring types, weight 10.739 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 90o, Aspendos mint, c. 465 - 420 B.C.; obverse warrior advancing right, nude, wearing crested helmet, couched spear in right hand, round shield on left arm; reverse triskeles of human legs counterclockwise, EΣ−Π counterclockwise staring lower left, all within an incuse square; $135.00 SALE |PRICE| $122.00


Aspendos, Pamphylia, c. 465 - 420 B.C.

|Aspendos|, |Aspendos,| |Pamphylia,| |c.| |465| |-| |420| |B.C.|, |stater|
In 467 B.C. the Athenian statesman and military commander Cimon, and his fleet of 200 ships, destroyed the Persian navy based at the mouth of the river Eurymedon in a surprise attack. In order to crush to Persian land forces, he tricked the Persians by sending his best fighters ashore wearing the garments of the hostages he had seized earlier. When they saw these men, the Persians thought that they were compatriots freed by the enemy and arranged festivities in celebration. Taking advantage of this, Cimon landed and annihilated the Persians. Aspendos then became a member of the Attic-Delos Maritime league.
GS94013. Silver stater, BMC Lycia p. 93, 1; SNG BnF 2; SNG Cop 153 var. (with ethnic EΣ on rev.); SNGvA 4477 var. (same), aVF, struck with worn dies, light marks, toned, test cut, weight 10.827 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, Aspendos mint, c. 465 - 420 B.C.; obverse warrior advancing right, wearing crested helmet, sword or couched spear in right hand, round shield on left arm; reverse triskeles of human legs counterclockwise, within an incuse square; $115.00 SALE |PRICE| $104.00


Aspendos, Pamphylia, c. 465 - 420 B.C.

|Aspendos|, |Aspendos,| |Pamphylia,| |c.| |465| |-| |420| |B.C.|, |stater|
In 467 B.C. the Athenian statesman and military commander Cimon, and his fleet of 200 ships, destroyed the Persian navy based at the mouth of the river Eurymedon in a surprise attack. In order to crush to Persian land forces, he tricked the Persians by sending his best fighters ashore wearing the garments of the hostages he had seized earlier. When they saw these men, the Persians thought that they were compatriots freed by the enemy and arranged festivities in celebration. Taking advantage of this, Cimon landed and annihilated the Persians. Aspendos then became a member of the Attic-Delos Maritime league.
GS94448. Silver stater, SNG Cop 153; cf. SNGvA 4477 (arrangement of legs and EΣ varies); SNG BnF 1 (same); BMC Lycia p. 93, 2 ff. (additional symbols on rev.), F, off center, struck with a worn obverse die, weight 10.8621 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Aspendos mint, c. 465 - 420 B.C.; obverse warrior advancing right, nude, wearing crested helmet, couched sword or spear in right hand, round shield on left arm; reverse triskeles of human legs clockwise, EΣ high across field, all within an incuse square; $22.99 (21.15)







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REFERENCES|

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Catalog current as of Sunday, August 9, 2020.
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