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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Greek Imperial| ▸ |Hispania||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Provincial Coins from Hispania

Castulo, Hispania Ulterior, c. 150 - 100 B.C.

|Hispania|, |Castulo,| |Hispania| |Ulterior,| |c.| |150| |-| |100| |B.C.|, |quarter| |unit|
After a local princess named Himilce married Hannibal, Castulo allied with Carthage. In 213 B.C., Castulo was the site of Hasdrubal Barca's crushing victory over the Roman army with a force of roughly 40,000 Carthaginian troops plus local Iberian mercenaries. Soon after the Romans made a pact with the residents and the city became a foederati (ally) of Rome.
SL89030. Bronze quarter unit, Villaronga-Benages 2152; Villaronga p. 337, 48; SNG BM Spain 1358; SNG Cop 208, NGC Ch VF, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (2490384-007), weight 1.766 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 270o, Castulo (near Linares, Spain) mint, mid 2nd century B.C.; obverse diademed male head right; reverse boar standing right, star of 7 rays around a central pellet above, "Kastilo" in Iberian script in exergue; ex Den of Antiquity; NGC| Lookup; $220.00 SALE |PRICE| $198.00


Carmo, Hispania Ulterior, Early 1st Century B.C.

|Hispania|, |Carmo,| |Hispania| |Ulterior,| |Early| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|, |as|NEW
Hispania is the Latin term given to the Iberian peninsula. Hispania Ulterior (Further Hispania) was a region of Hispania during the Roman Republic, roughly located in Baetica and in the Guadalquivir valley of modern Spain and extending to all of Lusitania (modern Portugal, Extremadura and a small part of Salamanca province) and Gallaecia (modern Northern Portugal and Galicia). Its capital was Corduba.
GB93424. Bronze as, Villaronga-Benages 2405 (R2), Villaronga 24, SNG BM Spain 1588 ff., Burgos 459, Choice VF, well centered, brown tone with buff earthen highlighting, die wear, porosity, weight 12.534 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, Carmo (Carmona, Seville) mint, early 1st century B.C.; obverse male head right; reverse CARMO, horizontal line above and below, between two heads of grain laying right one above and one below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $160.00 SALE |PRICE| $144.00


Indigets, Untikesken, Emporion, Iberia, c. 130 - 90 B.C.

|Iberia|, |Indigets,| |Untikesken,| |Emporion,| |Iberia,| |c.| |130| |-| |90| |B.C.|, |as|
Early in the 2nd century B.C., Emporion began striking bronze coinage with the Iberian inscription UTIKENSKEN, which refers to the Indigets tribe that inhabited the town and its surrounding area. The earliest coins were struck at a one ounce standard of 1/12 Roman pound. In the mid 2nd Century B.C., the standard changed to 1/15th of the Roman pound. Some of these coins were marked XV, most were marked with an Iberian EI mark, which means 15. The names of magistrates were added to some coins in the second half of the 2nd century B.C. Weights were gradually reduced until coinage with Iberian inscriptions ended in the 1st century B.C.
GB88304. Bronze as, reduced Roman ounce standard, Villaronga-Benages 1043 (same dies), Villaronga CNH 50, cf. SNG BM Spain 522, F, dark patina with attractive highlighting earthen deposits, soft strike, weak reverse, weight 14.462 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 90o, Emporion (Empries, Catalonia, Spain) mint, c. 130 - 90 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena-Minerva right, Iberian mark before: EI (15); reverse Pegasos springing right, head modified, laurel wreath above rump, palm frond outer right, Iberian inscription above exergue line: UTIKESKEN; ex Jenceck Historical Enterprise; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Lastigi, Hispania Ulterior, 150 - 100 B.C.

|Roman| |Hispania|, |Lastigi,| |Hispania| |Ulterior,| |150| |-| |100| |B.C.|, |quadrans|
After its defeat in 201 B.C., Carthage ceded Iberia to Rome. In 197 B.C., the peninsula was divided into Hispania Citerior (Nearer Hispania) and Hispania Ulterior (Further Hispania). Hispania Ulterior consisted of what are now Andalusia, Portugal, Extremadura, Castilla y Len, Galicia, Asturias, Cantabria, and the Basque Country. There was peace in the region until 155 B.C. when the Lusitanians attacked. The area was largely conquered by 138 B.C., but war continued until 19 B.C. when Agrippa defeated the Cantabrians in Hispania Citerior and Hispania finally was completely conquered. That same year, Augustus divided Hispania Ulterior into Baetica (modern Andalusia) and Lusitania (modern Portugal, Extremadura, and part of Castilla-Len). Hispania Citerior, which now included Cantabria and Basque country, was renamed Hispania Tarraconensis.
GB93425. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 2374 (R3), SNG BM Spain 1569 - 1571, Villaronga 4, SNG Cop 165, aF, dark tone, porous, weight 3.504 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 270o, Lastigi (Sancular la Mayor, Sevilla, Spain) mint, 150 - 100 B.C.; obverse helmeted male head right, laurel wreath border; reverse LAS within laurel wreath border; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Castulo, Hispania Ulterior, Mid 2nd Century B.C.

|Hispania|, |Castulo,| |Hispania| |Ulterior,| |Mid| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.|, |as|
After a local princess named Himilce married Hannibal, Castulo allied with Carthage. In 213 B.C., Castulo was the site of Hasdrubal Barca's crushing victory over the Roman army with a force of roughly 40,000 Carthaginian troops plus local Iberian mercenaries. Soon after the Romans made a pact with the residents and the city became a foederati (ally) of Rome.
GB89045. Bronze as, Villaronga-Benages 2126, Villaronga 23, SNG BM Spain 1298, Burgos 695, SNG Cop -, aVF, earthen encrustation, scratches, spots of light corrosion, reverse a little off center, weight 18.451 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 90o, Castulo (near Linares, Spain) mint, mid 2nd century B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse helmeted sphinx walking right, left foreleg raised, star before, KASTILO in Iberic script below exergue line; ex Rusty Romans; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Arse-Saguntum, Hispania Citerior, c. 170 - 130 B.C.

|Iberia|, |Arse-Saguntum,| |Hispania| |Citerior,| |c.| |170| |-| |130| |B.C.|, |quadrans|
Saguntum was built by Edetani Iberians in 5th century B.C. In 218 B.C., after enduring eight months of siege, the Saguntines' last defenses were finally overrun. Hannibal offered to spare the population if they were "willing to depart from Saguntum, unarmed, each with two garments." When they declined the offer and began to sabotage the town's wealth and possessions, every adult was put to death. Seven years later, the town was taken by Rome and made a Roman municipium. Saguntum grew to a city of about 50,000 inhabitants, with a great circus, a theater seating 8,000 and an amphitheater.
RP89712. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 1974, Alvarez-Burgos 2054, Villaronga CNH 33; SNG BM Spain 1112, VF, green patina, reverse center weak, light marks, light deposits, weight 2.267 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 0o, Saguntum (Sagunto, Valencia, Spain) mint, c. 170 - 130 B.C.; obverse scallop shell; reverse dolphin right, crescent with horns upward above, Iberian A and three pellets below; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Castulo, Hispania Ulterior, c. 150 - 80 B.C.

|Iberia|, |Castulo,| |Hispania| |Ulterior,| |c.| |150| |-| |80| |B.C.|, |semis|
After a local princess named Himilce married Hannibal, Castulo allied with Carthage. In 213 B.C., Castulo was the site of Hasdrubal Barca's crushing victory over the Roman army with a force of roughly 40,000 Carthaginian troops plus local Iberian mercenaries. Soon after the Romans made a pact with the residents and the city became a foederati (ally) of Rome.
GB91988. Bronze semis, Villaronga-Benages 2146 (R6, palm), BMC Spain 1360 ff., Villaronga 42, Alvarez-Burgos 717, F, edge chip, weight 6.784 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 270o, Castulo (near Linares, Spain) mint, c. 150 - 80 B.C.; obverse diademed male head right, [palm frond lower right, in an arc parallel to the border]; reverse bull standing right, crescent above, "Kastilo" in Iberian script in exergue; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00


Arse-Saguntum, Hispania Citerior, c. 170 - 130 B.C.

|Iberia|, |Arse-Saguntum,| |Hispania| |Citerior,| |c.| |170| |-| |130| |B.C.|, |quadrans|
Saguntum was built by Edetani Iberians in 5th century B.C. In 218 B.C., after enduring eight months of siege, the Saguntines' last defenses were finally overrun. Hannibal offered to spare the population if they were "willing to depart from Saguntum, unarmed, each with two garments." When they declined the offer and began to sabotage the town's wealth and possessions, every adult was put to death. Seven years later, the town was taken by Rome and made a Roman municipium. Saguntum grew to a city of about 50,000 inhabitants, with a great circus, a theater seating 8,000 and an amphitheater.
RP89710. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 1974, Alvarez-Burgos 2054, Villaronga CNH 33; SNG BM Spain 1112, VF, centers weakly struck, slightly off center, tight flan, weight 2.516 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 210o, Saguntum (Sagunto, Valencia, Spain) mint, c. 170 - 130 B.C.; obverse scallop shell; reverse dolphin right, crescent with horns upward above, Iberian A and three pellets below; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00


Arse-Saguntum, Hispania Citerior, c. 170 - 130 B.C.

|Iberia|, |Arse-Saguntum,| |Hispania| |Citerior,| |c.| |170| |-| |130| |B.C.|, |quadrans|
Saguntum was built by Edetani Iberians in 5th century B.C. In 218 B.C., after enduring eight months of siege, the Saguntines' last defenses were finally overrun. Hannibal offered to spare the population if they were "willing to depart from Saguntum, unarmed, each with two garments." When they declined the offer and began to sabotage the town's wealth and possessions, every adult was put to death. Seven years later, the town was taken by Rome and made a Roman municipium. Saguntum grew to a city of about 50,000 inhabitants, with a great circus, a theater seating 8,000 and an amphitheater.
RP89711. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 1974, Alvarez-Burgos 2054, Villaronga CNH 33; SNG BM Spain 1112, aVF, green patina, slightly rough, scratches, weight 2.939 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 180o, Saguntum (Sagunto, Valencia, Spain) mint, c. 170 - 130 B.C.; obverse scallop shell; reverse dolphin right, crescent with horns upward above, Iberian A and three pellets below; $8.55 (7.87)







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REFERENCES|

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