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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Artemis or Diana||View Options:  |  |  |   

Artemis or Diana

Virgin goddess of the hunt and the moon. Symbols include the deer and the bow. Twin sister of Apollo. Daughter of Zeus and Leto.

Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Ephesos, Ionia

|Ephesos|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Ephesos,| |Ionia||AE| |36|
See this type online:
RPC Online VI
Asia Minor Coins
ANS Mantis (No photo on ANS, but photo of this specimen is available on RPC Online.)
SH87621. Bronze AE 36, Karwiese MvE 5.2 p. 164, 750b (O3/R3, only 1 spec. of this variety); RPC Online VI T4956 (5 spec.); ANS Mantis 1972.185.5, Choice EF, excellent centering, olive green patina, some legend weak, small flaw/punch on reverse, porous, weight 25.344 g, maximum diameter 36.3 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesos mint, obverse AYT K M AYP CEB AΛEΞAN∆POC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse M-ONΩN - ΠPΩTΩN - ACIAC, on left: cult statue of Artemis standing facing, wearing ornate kalathos, flanked on each side by a stag, arms with supports; on right: Demeter enthroned left, wreathed in grain, two stalks of grain in right hand, long torch vertical in left hand; EΦECIΩN in exergue; only the second known of this variety with stags flanking Artemis, fantastic HUGE 36mm provincial bronze!; $2350.00 (€2162.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius III, c. 96 - 87 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |III,| |c.| |96| |-| |87| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
The inscription on the reverse of this coin translates, "King Demetrios, the god, father-loving, savior." He was nicknamed Eucaerus ("the Timely") by the Syrian Greeks but was called Acaerus ("the Untimely) by the Jews. He defeated the Hasmonaean priest king Alexander Jannaeus but was forced to withdraw from Judaea by the hostile population. While attempting to dethrone his brother, Philip I Philadelphus, he was defeated by the Arabs and Parthians, and taken prisoner. He was held in confinement in Parthia by Mithridates II until his death in 88 B.C.
SL94920. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber 2450(2); HGC 9 1305; cf. BMC Seleucid p. 101, 1 (SE 217, same controls); SNG Spaer 2863 (SE 219, different controls), NGC Ch XF, strike 5/5, surface 3/5 (5771210-005), weight 16.501 g, maximum diameter 30.10 mm, die axis 0o, Damaskos (Damascus, Syria) mint, 97 - 96 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Demetrios III right, fringe of curly beard at jawline, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩS / DHMHTPIOY / ΘEOY - ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ / ΣΩTHPOΣ, cult image of Atargatis standing facing, holding flower, barley stalk behind each shoulder, two monograms (controls) outer left, date CIS (Seleucid Era year 216) in exergue, ∆H monogram (control) in exergue on right, laurel wreath border; from the Ray Nouri Collection, NGC| Lookup; scarce; $1000.00 (€920.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius III, c. 96 - 87 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |III,| |c.| |96| |-| |87| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
The inscription on the reverse of this coin translates, "King Demetrios, the god, father-loving, savior." He was nicknamed Eucaerus ("the Timely") by the Syrian Greeks but was called Acaerus ("the Untimely) by the Jews. He defeated the Hasmonaean priest king Alexander Jannaeus but was forced to withdraw from Judaea by the hostile population. While attempting to dethrone his brother, Philip I Philadelphus, he was defeated by the Arabs and Parthians, and taken prisoner. He was held in confinement in Parthia by Mithridates II until his death in 88 B.C.
SL94921. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber 2450(3); Newell LSM 116a corr. (control ex. in error); Cohen DCA 303; HGC 9 1305; BMC Seleucid p. 101, 1 var. (different controls), NGC Ch XF, strike 5/5, surface 3/5 (5771210-004, in error has date yr. 218, 95/4 BC), weight 16.852 g, maximum diameter 30.2 mm, die axis 0o, Damaskos (Damascus, Syria) mint, 96 - 95 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Demetrios III right, fringe of curly beard at jawline, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩS / DHMHTPIOY / ΘEOY - ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ / ΣΩTHPOΣ, cult image of Atargatis standing facing, holding flower, barley stalk behind each shoulder, A over N (controls) outer left, date ΞIC (Seleucid Era year 217) in exergue, laurel wreath border; from the Ray Nouri Collection, NGC| Lookup; scarce; $1000.00 (€920.00)
 


Kingdom of Bithynia, Nikomedes I, c. 279 - 255 B.C.

|Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bithynia,| |Nikomedes| |I,| |c.| |279| |-| |255| |B.C.||AE| |17|
Nicomedes I was the first King of Bithynia to strike coins. He is primarily known for bringing the Gauls known as Galatians to the Asia Minor in 277 B.C. to fight against his brother and Antiochus I. This short-sighted mistake brought troubles for local Greeks for a century. About 264 B.C., according to Eusebius, he moved the capital to Nicomedia on the Propontis. Mørkholm describes the very similar portrait of Nikomedes on his tetradrachms as "the realistic portrait of an aged king with large and rugged facial features."
GB96095. Bronze AE 17, Rec Gen I-2 p. 219, 4, & pl. 29, 5; HGC 7 609 (R2); SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Tub -; BMC Pontus -, F, scratches, corrosion, rough, weight 4.477 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, c. 279 - 255 B.C.; obverse diademed head of the King right; reverse Warrior goddess Artemis-Bendis seated left on rock, two vertical spears in right hand, left hand resting on sword in sheath, circular shield on ground leaning on rock on near side, tree behind on far side of rock, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King) downward on right, NIKOMH∆OY (Nikomedes) downward on left, EP monogram outer left; only one sale of this type recorded on Coin Archives for the last two decades; extremely rare; $450.00 (€414.00)
 


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Aezani, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Aezani,| |Phrygia||AE| |18|NEW
Aizanoi, Latinized as Aezani, was an Ancient Greek city in western Anatolia. Located in what is now Cavdarhisar, Kutahya Province, its ruins are situated astride the River Penkalas, some 1,000 meters above sea level. The city was an important political and economic center in Roman times. Surviving remains from the period include a well-preserved Temple of Zeus, unusual combined thereat-stadium complex, and macellum inscribed with the Price Edict of Diocletian. The city fell into decline in Late Antiquity. Later serving as a citadel, in 2012 the site was submitted for addition to the UNESCO World Heritage List.
RP93134. Bronze AE 18, BMC Phrygia p. 40, 125; Weber 706, SNG Hunterian I 2007, RPC Online IV T1684; SNG Cop 103 var. (obv. leg., crescent and star), aVF, crude style, die wear, minor encrustations, flan crack, weight 3.077 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 225o, Aezani (Cavdarhisar, Turkey) mint, 184 - 192 A.D.; obverse AV KAI KOMO∆OC, laureate head right, no trace of drapery; reverse AIZANEITΩN, cult statue of Artemis of Ephesus standing facing, with arm supports, kalathos on head, no flanking crescent and star; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $130.00 (€119.60)
 


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius

|Faustina| |Sr.|, |Faustina| |Junior,| |Augusta| |146| |-| |Winter| |175/176| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Marcus| |Aurelius||denarius|
Lucifer means lightbringer, from the Latin lux light and ferre to bear or bring. The word Lucifer is found in only one place in the Bible - Isaiah 14:12 - but only in the King James and related versions: How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! The King James Version is based on the Vulgate, the Latin translation of Jerome. Jerome translated the Hebrew helel (bright or brilliant one) as lucifer, which was a reasonable Latin equivalent. And yet it is this lucifer, the bright one or lightbearer, that came to be understood by so many as the name for Satan, Lord of Darkness.
RS97468. Silver denarius, RIC III MA674, RSC II 85, BMCRE IV MA87, SRCV II 5250, VF, well centered, radiating flow lines , ragged flan with edge splits/cracks, weight 3.427 g, maximum diameter 11.0 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, struck under Marcus Aurelius, 161 - 175 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse DIANA LVCIF, Diana standing slightly left, head left, holding torch in both hands; ex Savoca Coins auction blue 89 (07 Nov 2020), lot 1259; $120.00 (€110.40)
 


Hierocaesarea, Lydia, c. 100 - 150 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Hierocaesarea,| |Lydia,| |c.| |100| |-| |150| |A.D.||AE| |17|
Hierocaesarea from the Greek for 'sacred' and the Latin for 'Caesar's', also known as Hieracome or Hierakome, was a town and bishopric in the late Roman province of Lydia, the metropolitan see of which was Sardis. Judging from its coins, it worshiped the goddess Artemis Persica.
RP92869. Bronze AE 17, Imhoof-Blumer LS 23; RPC III Online 1854; BMC Lydia p. 103, 6; SNG Cop 176; Waddington 5001; SNGvA -; Weber -, VF, nice green patina, obverse off center, broad flan, weight 3.163 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, Hierocaesarea (near Sazoba, Turkey) mint, c. 100 - 150 A.D.; obverse ΠEPCIKH, bust of Artemis Persica right, bow and quiver at shoulder; reverse IEPOKAICA-PE-ΩN (the last two letters in exergue), stag walking right; scarce; $80.00 (€73.60)
 


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Ephesos, Ionia

|Ephesos|, |Valerian| |I,| |October| |253| |-| |c.| |June| |260| |A.D.,| |Ephesos,| |Ionia||AE| |28|
Artemis is depicted here in the same pose as The Diana of Versailles, a slightly over life-size Roman marble statue from the 1st or 2nd century A.D., copying a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 B.C. The sculpture has a stag at her side, rather than a hound. The sculpture may have come from a sanctuary at Nemi or possibly from Hadrian's Villa in Tivoli. In 1556, it was given by Pope Paul IV to Henry II of France, a subtle allusion to the king's mistress, Diane de Poitiers. It is now in the Musée du Louvre, Paris.
RP94243. Bronze AE 28, Karwiese 1032(c); SNGvA 1922; SNG Cop -; SNG Hunter -; BMC Ionia -, aVF, green patina, earthen deposits, light corrosion, weight 7.719 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesos mint, obverse AYT K ΠO ΛIKIN BAΛEPIANOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse EΦECIΩN Γ NEOKOPΩN, Artemis advancing right, bow in left hand, with right hand drawing arrow from quiver, on shoulder, hound at feet behind running right; $80.00 (€73.60)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius I Soter, 162 - 150 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |I| |Soter,| |162| |-| |150| |B.C.||AE| |20|
As required by the Treaty of Apamea, Demetrius, the son of Seleucus IV, was held in Rome as a hostage. After Antiochus IV (his uncle) died, he claimed the right to rule but Rome preferred Antiochus V, a weak child. Demetrius escaped, was welcomed in Syria and took his throne. Antiochus V and his regent were executed. Demetrius defeated Judas Maccabaeus and restored Seleukid control over Judaea.
GB95287. Bronze serrated AE 20, Houghton-Lorber II 1645; Houghton CSE 170; SNG Spaer 1295 ff.; BMC Seleucid p. 80, 3 - 4; Babelon 727 ff.; HGC 9 826 (S), F, well centered, porous, small central cavities, weight 7.680 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 162 - 150 B.C.; obverse bust of Artemis right wearing stephane, bow and quiver at shoulder; reverse bow and quiver with strap, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ∆HMHTPIOY downward on left, no control symbols; $65.00 (€59.80)
 


Kyme, Aiolis, 2nd Century B.C.

|Aeolis|, |Kyme,| |Aiolis,| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |16|
The types on this coin are unusual. In a recent auction, Nomos AG noted the male figure in the chariot is not only wearing military garb but on some specimens also appears to have a laurel wreath on his head (not visible on this coin). If he is laureate, he could be a Roman emperor, which would date this type to the 1st or early 2nd century A.D. We agree, the long accepted Hellenistic date for this type could be wrong.
GB96107. Bronze AE 16, SNG Cop 113; SNGvA 1644; SNG Munchen 512; BMC Troas p. 113, 96, aVF, slightly rough, die damage reverse center, obverse off center, weight 3.797 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 0o, Kyme (near Nemrut Limani, Turkey) mint, 2nd century B.C.; obverse Artemis standing right, long torch in left hand, quiver and bow on back, clasping right hands with Amazon Kyme, Kyme standing left, transverse scepter in left hand, K-Y flanking the figures; reverse two figures in a slow quadriga right, draped female (Kyme?) in front holding reins, male behind, wearing military dress, holding a long transverse spear; $60.00 (€55.20)
 




  



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