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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Mysia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Coins of Mysia, Antatolia

Mysia is the northwestern region of Anatolia (Asia Minor) located on the shore of the Propontis (Marmara Sea) between Troas and Bithynia. The chief physical features of Mysia are the two mountains, Mount Olympus at (7600 ft) in the north and Mount Temnus in the south. The most important cities were Pergamon in the valley of the Caïcus, and Cyzicus on the Propontis. The whole sea-coast was studded with Greek towns, several of which were places of considerable importance; thus the northern portion included Parium, Lampsacus and Abydos, and the southern Assos, Adramyttium. Further south, on the Eleatic Gulf, were Elaea, Myrina and Cyme.


Western Anatolia, c. 620 - 600 B.C., Plain Globular Type

|Archaic| |Electrum|, |Western| |Anatolia,| |c.| |620| |-| |600| |B.C.,| |Plain| |Globular| |Type|, hekte
Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

Unpublished! The majority of the earliest electrum issues were struck on the lighter Milesian weight standard, with hectes weighing approximately 2.35 grams. This example, however is on the heavier Phocaic standard that was used at mints such as Cyzicus, Mysia and Phocaea, Ionia.
SH85577. Electrum hekte, Phokaic standard 1/6 stater; unpublished, EF, flan cracks, weight 2.721 g, maximum diameter 8.96 mm, uncertain western Anatolia mint, c. 620 - 600 B.C.; obverse plain globular surface; reverse one small incuse square punch; extremely rare; $2300.00 (€2070.00)


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 500 - 450 B.C.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |500| |-| |450| |B.C.|, hekte
Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world. It was said to have been founded by Pelasgians from Thessaly, according to tradition at the coming of the Argonauts; later, allegedly in 756 B.C., it received many colonists from Miletus. Owing to its advantageous position it speedily acquired commercial importance, and the gold staters of Cyzicus were a staple currency in the ancient world till they were superseded by those of Philip of Macedon. The site of Cyzicus, located on the Erdek and Bandirma roads, is protected by Turkey's Ministry of Culture.
SL89446. Electrum hekte, SNG BnF 241; SNGvA 1180; BMC Mysia p. 32, 98; Von Fritze I 102; Rosen 482; de Luynes pl. XCII 2460; SNG Cop -, NGC XF, strike 3/5, surface 3/5 (2490378-004), weight 2.674 g, maximum diameter 11.4 mm, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 500 - 450 B.C.; obverse satyr left, tunny fish vertical with head down to left; reverse quadripartite incuse square; extremely rare; $900.00 (€810.00)


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great

|Kingdom| |of| |Thrace|, |Kingdom| |of| |Thrace,| |Lysimachos,| |305| |-| |281| |B.C.,| |Portrait| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great|, tetradrachm
Thompson notes that Lampsacus was Lysimachos largest mint in Asia Minor, with approximately 150 known obverse dies. Output from Lampsacus declined when Amphipolis began its extensive coinage c. 288 B.C.
SH93850. Silver tetradrachm, Thompson 47, Müller 401, SNG BnF 2540, HGC 3.2 1750b, VF, spectacular high relief portrait, light tone, well centered, bumps and scratches, porosity, weight 16.739 g, maximum diameter 28.6 mm, die axis 0o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 297 - 281 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse Athena enthroned left, Nike crowning name in her right hand, resting left arm on grounded round shield behind, transverse spear against right side, HP monogram inner left, crescent with horns left in exergue, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ΛYΣIMAXOY downward on left; ex Divus Numismatik; $650.00 (€585.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander the Great

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Antigonos| |I| |Monophthalmos,| |323| |-| |301| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |and| |Types| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great|, drachm
Struck by Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") as strategos of Asia (320 - 306 B.C.) or as king (306 - 301 B.C.). Antigonos I was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
SL76591. Silver drachm, Price 1418, Müller Alexander, SNG Cop, SNG München, SNG Alpha Bank, NGC Ch XF, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (2490386-003), weight 4.140 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 270o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, nude to waist, right leg drawn back, himation around waist and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, amphora in left field, Θ under throne; struck by Antigonus I Monophthalmus ("the One-eyed") as strategos of Asia (320 - 306 B.C.) or as king (306 - 301 B.C.); $300.00 (€270.00)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Parion, Mysia(?)

|Parium|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Parion,| |Mysia(?)|, AE 17
The attribution of this very rare type to Parium is uncertain. See RPC II p. 137.

The ceremonial founding of a new Roman colony included plowing a furrow, the pomerium, a sacred boundary, around the site of the new city.
RP94085. Bronze AE 17, RPC II Online 889 (12 spec.), SNGvA 6202, F, mottled green patina, bumps and scratches, slightly off center, obverse legend not fully struck, weight 4.016 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Parion, Mysia(?) mint, 13 Sep 81 - 18 Sep 96 A.D.; obverse DOMIT AVG (clockwise from the upper right), laureate head left; reverse priest plowing right with two oxen, marking the pomerium (sacred boundary marked for the foundation of a new Roman colony), GERM in exergue; zero sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; very rare; $200.00 (€180.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Antigonus| |I| |Monophthalmus,| |323| |-| |301| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great|, drachm
Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (strategos of Asia, 320 - 306/5 B.C., king, 306/5 - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS88925. Silver drachm, Price 1389, Müller Alexander 912, SNG Saroglos 708, SNG Alpha Bank 583, SNG Cop -, SNG München -, gVF, well centered, light scratches, porosity, earthen encrustations, weight 4.125 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 90o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, lotus tipped long scepter vertical in left hand, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind, Pegasos forepart (control) left, MAΛ monogram (control) under throne; $170.00 (€153.00)


Lampsakos, Mysia, 394 - 330 B.C.

|Lampsakos|, |Lampsakos,| |Mysia,| |394| |-| |330| |B.C.|, trihemiobol
Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth.
GB88954. Silver trihemiobol, SNG Cop 196, Baldwin Lampsakos 36 ff. var., SNG Delepierre 2525 var., BMC Mysia 49 var., Dewing 2199 var., SNGvA 1296 var. (control varieties), aVF, dark toning, bumps and marks, high points flat, weight 1.123 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 394 - 330 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse forepart of Pegasos flying right, curved archaic style wing, Λ-A-M around above, star (control symbol) below; ex Dmitry Markov Coins & Medals; $165.00 (€148.50)


Adramytion, Mysia, 2nd Century B.C.

|Other| |Mysia|, |Adramytion,| |Mysia,| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.|, AE 22
Adramytteion was a coastal town northwest of Pergamon in Mysia, said to be founded by Adramys, brother of King Kroisos. In classical times, Adramyttium received settlers from Athens and Delos. It later belonged to the Roman province of Asia, whose capital was Ephesus. The ancient city with its harbor has entirely disappeared. Paul, while being taken as prisoner from Caesarea to Rome, embarked upon a ship belonging to Adramyttium (Acts 27:2). It conveyed him only to Myra, in Lycia, from which he sailed on an Alexandrian ship for Italy.
GB89047. Bronze AE 22, von Fritze Mysiens 32, SNG BnF 14, SNG Cop 4, BMC Mysia -, SNGvA -, VF, well centered, dark patina, earthen deposits, scratches, spots of light corrosion, weight 7.863 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 0o, Adramytion (Edremit, Turkey) mint, magistrate Nikolochos, 2nd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo left, hair tied at the back with two locks falling down neck, two A∆PAMYTHNΩN below; reverse cornucopia between two pilei (caps of the Dioskouroi) with stars above, NIKO-LO/XOY (magistrate) in two lines above and below caps, monogram lower right; ex Gerhard Rohde Ancient Coins; rare; $160.00 (€144.00)


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 123 - 104 B.C.

|Pergamon|, |Pergamon,| |Mysia,| |c.| |123| |-| |104| |B.C.|, cistophoric tetradrachm
The cista mystica was a basket used for housing sacred snakes in connection with the initiation ceremony into the cult of Bacchus (Dionysus). In the Dionysian mysteries a snake, representing the god and possibly symbolic of his phallus, was carried in a cista mystica on a bed of vine leaves. The cista in the mysteries of Isis may also have held a serpent, perhaps associated with the missing phallus of Osiris.

The thyrsus is the staff carried by Bacchus and his associates; topped by a pine cone or a bunch of ivy leaves and wreathed with tendrils of vine or ivy.
GS91522. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Kleiner Pergamum p. 80, 8; Pinder -; SNG BnF -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; BMC Mysia -, VF, well centered, old collection toning, bumps and marks, die wear, weight 12.250 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 45o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 123 - 104 B.C.; obverse cista mystica with half open lid, from which a snake emerges left, all within wreath of ivy leaves and berries; reverse bow-case ornamented with an apluster, strung bow emerging upper left, flanked on each side by a snake with head erect, WPA monogram (control) between heads of snakes, straps from case draped over snakes below, (Pergamon monogram) to left, snake entwined thyrsos to right; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $150.00 (€135.00)


Valerian II, Caesar, Early 256 - 258 A.D., Parium, Mysia

|Parium|, |Valerian| |II,| |Caesar,| |Early| |256| |-| |258| |A.D.,| |Parium,| |Mysia|, AE 21
Located near Lampsacus, Parium belonged to the Delian League. In the Hellenistic period, it was in the domain of Lysimachus and then the Attalid dynasty. Julius Caesar refounded it as a colonia within the province of Asia. After Asia was divided in the 4th century, it was in the province of Hellespontus.
RP92066. Bronze AE 21, Apparently unpublished in standard references, SNG Righetti 743 var. (obv. legend), BMC Mysia -, SNG BnF -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Tüb -, SNG Hunt -, F, well centered, bumps an scratches, weight 3.806 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 0o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, Early 256 - 258 A.D.; obverse VALERIANVS NOBIL CAES, laureate, draped (and cuirassed?) bust right; reverse Capricorn swimming right, cornucopia on back, holding celestial globe between legs, C G I H P (Colonia Gemella Iulia Hadriana Pariana) below; ex John Jencek; extremely rare, unpublished in standard references, two specimens known to Forum (from auctions); $140.00 (€126.00)




  






REFERENCES|

ANS Collections Database - http://numismatics.org/search/
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Catalog current as of Thursday, February 20, 2020.
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Mysia, Anatoloia