Allison Sermarini's Maps of the Ancient World
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Cities of Lydia c. 50 AD8 viewsCities of Lydia c. 50 ADSep 26, 2019
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A map of Gaul in the 1st century BC, showing the relative position of the Bellovaci tribe.12 viewsA map of Gaul in the 1st century BC, showing the relative position of the Bellovaci tribe.Sep 20, 2019
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The Sultanate of Rûm and surrounding states, c. 1200.372 viewsThe Sultanate of Rum seceded from the Seljuk Empire in 1077, with capitals first at Iznik and then at Konya. The name Rûm derives from the Arabic name for Romans, ar-Rūm, itself a loan from Greek Pωμαῖοι, referring to the Greek people that had been ruled by the Romans (the Byzantines). They reached the height of power during the late 12th and early 13th century, when it succeeded in taking Byzantine ports on the Mediterranean and Black Sea. Trade from Iran and Central Asia was developed using caravans, and strong trade ties with the Genoese formed during this period. The increased wealth allowed the sultanate to absorb other Turkish states in eastern Anatolia (Danishmends, Mengujekids, Saltukids, Artuqids). They eventually succumbed to the Mongol invasion in 1243 (Battle of Köse Dağ), and became vassals of the Ilkhanate. Their power disintegrated during the second half of the 13th century. The last Seljuq sultans was murdered in 1308. The dissolution of the Seljuq state left behind small states, among them that of the Ottoman dynasty, which eventually conquered and reunited Anatolia to become the Ottoman Empire.Sep 02, 2019
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Map - Seljuks of Rum29 viewsMap of the Anatolian Seljuk Sultanate in 1243.

The Seljuks were a Central Asian nomadic group of Sunni Muslims. The last Seljuk sultan died in battle in 1194 when the Great Seljuks were defeated by the Mongols. A breakaway group, the Seljuks of Rum, settled in Anatolia. They too eventually succumbed to the continuing Mongol expansion of the 12th and 13th centuries.
Sep 02, 2019
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Map - Tribes of Ancient Thrace227 viewsMap of Tribes inhabiting Thrace and Environs, Tribes in Thrace pre-Roman conquest. Includes migrations of Celts and Gauls.Aug 30, 2019
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Tribes in Thrace pre-Roman conquest 35 viewsAug 30, 2019
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Map - Roman Britain - Roman Road Network and the the Antonine Itinerary27 viewsBased on Jones & Mattingly's Atlas of Roman Britain (ISBN 978-1-84217-06700, 1990, reprinted 2007), pp. 23–28; Frere's Britannia (Third edition, 1987, revised); Codrington's Roman Roads in Britain; Reynold's Iter Britanniarum; and other minor sources — the sources are cited in the image legend.Aug 22, 2019
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Map - London Reconstruction 120 AD20 viewsMap - London Reconstruction 120 ADAug 22, 2019
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Map - London 400 A.D.19 viewsA general outline of Roman London in late antiquity, with the modern banks of the Thames. Discovered roads drawn as double lines; conjectural roads, single lines.Aug 22, 2019
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Map - Italy 1796188 viewsMap of Italy in 1796.Aug 16, 2019
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Map - Italy 1494 34 viewsMap of Italy in 1494.Aug 16, 2019
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Map - Georgian States Colchis and Iberia, 600 - 150 B.C.97 viewsMap - Georgian States Colchis and Iberia, 600 - 150 B.C.

Kolchis (Colchis) was an ancient kingdom and region on the coast of the Black Sea, centered in present-day western Georgia. The original Middle Bronze Age inhabitants were probably the ancestors of the present Swan, Mingrelian and Laz people. It was described as a land rich with gold, iron, timber and honey that exported its resources mostly to Greece. The Greeks invaded Kolchis in the 6th to the 5th centuries B.C. colonized and in 302 B.C. It became part of the newly founded Kingdom of Iberia. Kolchis was later divided into several principalities, until their annexation around 101 B.C. by Mithridates VI of Pontus. After that it was involved in wars with the Roman Empire. In 66 B.C. they were defeated by Pompey and became part of the Roman Empire. Christianity began in the 1st century AD. spread by Kolchis and in the 4th century it became the official religion. At that time it formed an important part of medieval Georgia, along with the Kingdom of Iberia.

In Greek mythology, Kolchis was the location of the Golden Fleece sought by Jason and the Argonauts. The myth may have originated from the ancient local practice of using moss to separate gold dust from river bed mud.

Christianity began in the 1st century AD. spread by Kolchis and in the 4th century it became the official religion. At that time it formed an important part of medieval Georgia, along with the Kingdom of Iberia.
Jul 30, 2019
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Maps - Plan of Jerusalem Ancient and Plan of Modern [1849] Jerusalem88 viewsMaps - Plan of Jerusalem Ancient and Plan of Modern [1849] Jerusalem
McPhun, W.R., McPhun's New Polyglot Bible. (Glasgow, 1849).
May 13, 2019
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Map - Plan of the Temple of Jerusalem88 viewsPlan of the Temple of Jerusalem
2 Drawings - The Temple with its Courts, and The Temple on an Enlarged Scale
McPhun, W.R., McPhun's New Polyglot Bible. (Glasgow, 1849).
May 13, 2019
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Ancient North Africa748 views1 commentsApr 18, 2019
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matrix test85 viewsApr 18, 2019
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Map 526 AD Europe at the Death of Theoderic the Great83 viewsThird map (of four) from plate 19 of Professor G. Droysen's Allgemeiner Historischer Handatlas, published by R. Andrée. Plate is titled "Europa zur Zeit der Völkerwanderung". This map is titled "Europa beim Tode Theoderichs d. Gr. (526)Apr 13, 2019
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Map - China, Qin dynasty 221 - 206 B.C.78 viewsMap of Qin Dynasty and its administrative divisions, 221 - 206 B.C.

The Qin dynasty was the first dynasty of Imperial China, lasting from 221 to 206 B.C. Named for its heartland in Qin state (modern Gansu and Shaanxi), the dynasty was founded by Qin Shi Huang, the First Emperor of Qin. The strength of the Qin state was greatly increased by the Legalist reforms of Shang Yang in the fourth century B.C., during the Warring States period. In the mid and late third century B.C., the Qin state carried out a series of swift conquests, first ending the powerless Zhou dynasty, and eventually conquering the other six of the Seven Warring States. Its 15 years was the shortest major dynasty in Chinese history, consisting of only two emperors, but inaugurated an imperial system that lasted from 221 B.C., with interruption and adaptation, until 1912 A.D.
Mar 26, 2019
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Map - The Great Jin, the Jurchen Jin Dynasty, as of 1142 A.D.70 viewsMap - The Great Jin, the Jurchen Jin Dynasty, as of 1142 A.D.

The Jin dynasty, the Great Jin, ruled north eastern China 1115 to 1234. Its name is sometimes written as Kin, Jurchen Jin or Jinn in English to differentiate it from an earlier Chinese dynasty with the same name. Its rulers were of Jurchen descent. After vanquishing the Liao, the Jin launched an over hundred-year struggle against the Song dynasty, in southern China. Over the course of their rule, the Jurchens of Jin quickly adapted to Chinese customs, and even fortified the Great Wall against the rising Mongols. The Mongols invaded the Jin under Genghis Khan in 1211 and inflicted catastrophic defeats. Although the Jin seemed to suffer a never-ending wave of defeats, revolts, defections, and coups, they proved tenacious. The Jin finally succumbed to Mongol conquest 23 years later in 1234.
Mar 25, 2019
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Map China showing Eastern Wei, Western Wei and Liang, c. 535–557.67 viewsMap China showing Eastern Wei, Western Wei and Liang, c. 535–557.Mar 25, 2019
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Map - Xin Dynasty 8 - 23 A.D.157 viewsXin Dynasty 8 - 23 A.D.

Wang Mang was a Han Dynasty official and consort kin who seized the throne from the Liu family and founded the Xin Dynasty, ruling 9–23 A.D. The Han dynasty was restored after his overthrow, and his rule marks the separation between the Western Han Dynasty (before Xin) and Eastern Han Dynasty (after Xin). Some historians have traditionally viewed Wang as a usurper, while others have portrayed him as a visionary and selfless social reformer. Though a learned Confucian scholar who sought to implement the harmonious society he saw in the classics, his efforts ended in chaos. In October 23 A.D., the capital Chang'an was attacked and the imperial palace ransacked. Wang Mang died in the battle. The Han dynasty was reestablished in 25 A.D. when Liu Xiu (Emperor Guangwu) took the throne.
Mar 25, 2019
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Map - Western Hahn Dynasty in 87 B.C.155 viewsMap - Western Hahn Dynasty in 87 B.C.

Showing the capital Chang'an and the location of all commandery seats. In the Western Regions, a number of pretectorates were Han vassals and under the nominal authority of the Chief Protector of the Western Regions appointed by the Han court.

From roughly 115 to 60 BC, Han forces fought the Xiongnu over control of the oasis city-states in the Tarim Basin. Han was eventually victorious and established the Protectorate of the Western Regions in 60 BC, which dealt with the region's defense and foreign affairs. The Han also expanded southward. The naval conquest of Nanyue in 111 BC expanded the Han realm into what are now modern Guangdong, Guangxi, and northern Vietnam. Yunnan was brought into the Han realm with the conquest of the Dian Kingdom in 109 BC, followed by parts of the Korean Peninsula with the Han conquest of Gojoseon and colonial establishments of Xuantu Commandery and Lelang Commandery in 108 BC. In China's first known nationwide census taken in 2 AD, the population was registered as having 57,671,400 individuals in 12,366,470 households.
Mar 25, 2019
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Map - Greek and Latin states in southern Greece, c. 1210197 viewsPolitical map of southern Greece in c. 1210, after the establishment of the Crusader states following the Fourth Crusade.

After Constantinople was conquered during the Fourth Crusade in 1204, Greece was divided among the Crusaders. The Latin Empire held Constantinople and Thrace, while Greece itself was divided into the Kingdom of Thessalonica, the Principality of Achaea, and the Duchy of Athens. The Venetians controlled the Duchy of the Archipelago in the Aegean, and the Despotate of Epirus was established as one of the three Byzantine Greek successor states. Michael VIII restored the empire in 1261, having also regained the Kingdom of Thessalonica. By his death in 1282, Michael had taken back the Aegean islands, Thessaly, Epirus, and most of Achaea, including the Crusader fortress of Mystras, which became the seat of a Byzantine despotate. However, Athens and the northern Peloponnese remained in Crusader hands. With the exception of the Ionian Islands and some isolated forts which remained in Venetian hands until the turn of the 19th century, the final end of the Frankokratia in the Greek lands came with the Ottoman conquest, chiefly in the 14th to 16th centuries.
Mar 14, 2019
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Map 1214 The Latin Empire62 viewsThe borders of the Latin Empire and Byzantine Empire after the 4th crusade (1204) up to the Treaty of Nymphaeum in 1214. Mar 13, 2019
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Map - German States, Brandenburg, 1320 A.D.71 viewsMap - German States, Brandenburg, 1320 A.D.Feb 17, 2019
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6th Century Medeba Mosaic Map (Click on image to enlarge)90 viewsThis map was originally part of the floor of a Byzantine church, built during the reign of emperor Justinian, AD 527-565. It is the oldest map of the Holy Land that is still extant. The original size of the map was approximately 51 ft x 19.5 ft (15.5 m x 6 m), although no borders are visible. The map is made of various colors. It has 150 Greek inscriptions in various sizes, and covers the area from Tyre in the north to the Egyptian Delta in the south.

The modern Arab village of Medeba (Madaba) is built on the ruins of biblical Medeba and it was during the construction of the modern Church of St. George that the “Madaba Map” was found.
Jan 19, 2019
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Map 450 A.D. - Attila and the Roman Empire195 viewsEmpire of Attila and the Roman Empire around 450 AD. Settlement area of Germanic tribes within the Imperium Roman are marked, controlled areas are in color.Jan 06, 2019
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Map - Thracian Chersonese (Gallipoli)173 viewsMap of ancient Thracian Chersonese (Gallipoli)Jan 01, 2019
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Map 300 A.D. - The Tetrarchy90 viewsMap of the Roman Empire under the tetrarchy, showing the dioceses and the four tetrarchs' zones of influence post 299 after Diocletian and Galerius had exchanged their allocated provinces.Dec 21, 2018
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Map - Kingdom of Northumbria 802 AD83 viewsKingdom of Northumbria 802 AD

The Kingdom of Northumbria was a medieval Anglian kingdom in what is now northern England and south-east Scotland. The name derives from the Old English Norþan-hymbre meaning "the people or province north of the Humber", which reflects the approximate southern limit to the kingdom's territory, the Humber Estuary. Northumbria started to consolidate into one kingdom in the early seventh century. At its height, the kingdom extended from just south of the Humber to the River Mersey and to the Firth of Forth, in Scotland. Northumbria ceased to be an independent kingdom in the mid-tenth century.
Dec 16, 2018
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Judea after Herod91 viewsJudea after Herod (Modified from Wikipedia)Dec 13, 2018
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1204 AD The Latin Empire and Partition of the Byzantine Empire after the 4th Crusade, c. 1204.94 viewsThe Latin Empire and the Partition of the Byzantine Empire after the 4th crusade, c. 1204; borders are approximate.Nov 10, 2018
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1204 AD The Latin Empire and Partition of the Byzantine Empire after the 4th Crusade, c. 1204.113 viewsThe Latin Empire and the Partition of the Byzantine Empire after the 4th crusade, c. 1204; borders are approximate.Nov 10, 2018
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Vietnam Territorial expansion from Ly Dynasty to early Nguyen Dynasty.110 viewsHistory of Vietnam
Geographical Names - Rulers
2879–2524 BC Xich Quy - Hong Bang dynasty
2524–258 BC Van Lang - Hong Bang dynasty
257–179 BC Au Lac - Thuc dynasty
207–111 BC Nam Viet - Trieu dynasty (southern China as well as northern Vietnam, capital: Panyu)
111 BC–40 AD Giao Chi - 1st Chinese domination
40–43 Linh Nam - Trung Sisters
43–299 Giao Chi - 2nd Chinese domination
299–544 Giao Chau - 2nd Chinese domination
544–602 Van Xuan - Early Ly dynasty
602–938 Giao Chau - 3rd Chinese domination
602–679 An Nam
679–757 An Nam
757–766 Tran Nam
766–866 An Nam
866–939 Tinh Hai quan
939–967 Tinh Hai quan - Ngo dynasty
968–980 Dai Co Viet - Dinh dynasty
980–1054 Dai Co Viet - Early Le dynasty
1054–1009 Dai Viet - Early Le dynasty
1009–1225 Dai Viet - Later Ly dynasty
1225–1400 Dai Viet - Tran dynasty
1400–1407 Dai Ngu - Ho dynasty
1407–1413 Giao Chi - 4th Chinese domination/Later Tran dynasty
1413–1427 Giao Chi - 4th Chinese domination
1428–1777 Dai Viet - Later Le dynasty
- 1527–1592 Mac dynasty
- 1545–1787 Trinh lords
- 1558–1777 Nguyen lords
1778–1804 Dai Viet - Tay Son dynasty
1804–1839 Viet Nam - Nguyen dynasty
1839–1945 Dai Nam - Nguyen dynasty
1858–1954 French Indochina (Tonkin, Annam, & Cochinchina)
1945 Empire of Vietnam - Nguyen dynasty
1945–1976 North Vietnam - Democratic Republic of Vietnam
1955–1975 South Vietnam - Republic of Vietnam
1975–1976 South Vietnam - North Vietnamese Occupation
From 1976 Unification of Vietnam
Aug 17, 2018
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Crete229 viewsCrete is the largest and most populous of the Greek islands, the 88th largest island in the world and the fifth largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, after Sicily, Sardinia, Cyprus, and Corsica. The capital and the largest city is Heraklion. As of 2011, the region had a population of 623,065. Crete forms a significant part of the economy and cultural heritage of Greece, while retaining its own local cultural traits (such as its own poetry and music). It was once the centre of the Minoan civilisation (c. 2700–1420 BC), which is the earliest known civilisation in Europe. The palace of Knossos lies in Crete.Jun 24, 2018
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550 B.C. Greek and Phoenician Colonies, Lydian Kingdom, Thracians and Illyrians244 views550 B.C. Greek and Phoenician Colonies, Lydian Kingdom, Thracians and Illyrians.Jun 10, 2018
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Gepidia at its largest territorial extent138 viewsThe Gepids reached the zenith of their power after 537, settling in the rich area around Singidunum (today's Belgrade). For a short time, the city of Sirmium (present-day Sremska Mitrovica) was the center of the Gepid State and the king Cunimund minted golden coins in it. In 546 the Byzantine Empire allied themselves with the Lombards, and in 552 the Gepids suffered a disastrous defeat from Alboin, king of the Lombards, in the Battle of Asfeld, after which Alboin had a drinking cup made from the skull of Cunimund.

List of Gepid kings
Ardaric, fl. c. 454
Gunderit
Thraustila, fl. 488
Thrasaric, fl. 505
Mundonus
Elemund, ?-548
Thurisind, 548-c. 560
Cunimund, c. 560-567

See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gepids
May 23, 2018
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Roman Empire 117 AD - Senatorial Provinces, Imperial Provinces and Client States251 viewsRoman Empire 117 AD - Senatorial Provinces, Imperial Provinces and Client States. Mar 17, 2018
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Hellenistic Kingdoms 300 B.C. 313 viewsHellenistic Kingdoms 300 B.C. Feb 22, 2018
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Map - Ptolemaic Kingdom, 200 B.C.256 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, 200 B.C. During the reign of Ptolemy V.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ptolemaic-Empire_200bc.jpg
Feb 22, 2018
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China Map, Yan State, 260 BCE151 viewsThe history of Yan began in the Western Zhou in the early first millennium BC. After the authority of the Zhou king declined during the Spring and Autumn period in the 8th century BC, Yan survived and became one of the strongest states in China. Its capital was Ji (later known as Yanjing and now Beijing). During the Warring States period, the court was also moved to another capital at Xiadu at times. Despite the wars, Yan survived through the Warring States period. In 227 B.C., with Qin troops on the border after the collapse of Zhao, Crown Prince Dan sent an assassin to kill the king of Qin, hoping to end the threat. The mission failed. Surprised and enraged by such a bold act, the king of Qin determined to destroy Yan. The bulk of the Yan army was crushed at the frozen Yi River, Ji fell the following year and the ruler, King Xi, fled to the Liaodong Peninsula. In 222 B.C., Liaodong fell as well, and Yan was totally conquered by Qin. Yan was the third last state to fall, and with its destruction the fates of the remaining two kingdoms were sealed. In 221 B.C., Qin conquered all of China, ending the Warring States period and founding the Qin dynasty. Yan experienced a brief period of independence after the collapse of the Qin dynasty in 207 B.C., but it was eventually absorbed by the victorious Han.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:EN-YAN260BCE.jpg
Feb 21, 2018
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The Late Roman fortifications of the “Saxon Shore” (litus Saxonicum) in Britain and northern France.211 viewsThe Late Roman fortifications of the “Saxon Shore” (litus Saxonicum) in Britain and northern France.

The Saxon Shore (Latin: litus Saxonicum) was a military command of the late Roman Empire, consisting of a series of fortifications on both sides of the English Channel. It was established in the late 3rd century and was led by the "Count of the Saxon Shore". In the late 4th century, his functions were limited to Britain, while the fortifications in Gaul were established as separate commands. Several Saxon Shore forts survive in east and south-east England.
Jan 20, 2018
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The Late Roman fortifications of the “Saxon Shore” (litus Saxonicum) in Britain and northern France.176 viewsThe Late Roman fortifications of the “Saxon Shore” (litus Saxonicum) in Britain and northern France.

The Saxon Shore (Latin: litus Saxonicum) was a military command of the late Roman Empire, consisting of a series of fortifications on both sides of the English Channel. It was established in the late 3rd century and was led by the "Count of the Saxon Shore". In the late 4th century, his functions were limited to Britain, while the fortifications in Gaul were established as separate commands. Several Saxon Shore forts survive in east and south-east England.
Jan 20, 2018
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Map - Judea under Judas Maccabeus 167 - 160 B.C. 440 viewsJudah Maccabee (or Judas Maccabeus, also spelled Machabeus, or Maccabaeus) was a Jewish priest (kohen) and a son of the priest Mattathias. He led the Maccabean Revolt against the Seleucid Empire (167–160 BCE). The Jewish holiday of Hanukkah ("Dedication") commemorates the restoration of Jewish worship at the temple in Jerusalem in 164 BCE, after Judah Maccabee removed the Hellenistic statuary.Dec 17, 2017
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Map - Judea under Simon Maccabeus 142 - 135 B.C.171 viewsGreen - area ruled by Judea in 143 B.C.
Purple - area conquered by Simon Maccabeus

Simon Maccabeus was the second son of Mattathias and thus a member of the Hasmonean family. He became the first prince of the Hebrew Hasmonean Dynasty. He reigned from 142 to 135 BCE. The Hasmonean Dynasty was founded by a resolution, adopted in 141 BCE, at a large assembly "of the priests and the people and of the elders of the land, to the effect that Simon should be their leader and high priest forever, until there should arise a faithful prophet" (1 Maccabees 14:41). Recognition of the new dynasty by the Roman Republic was accorded by the Senate about 139 BCE, when the delegation of Simon was in Rome. Simon made the Jewish people semi-independent of the Seleucid Empire. In February 135 BCE, he was assassinated at the instigation of his son-in-law and rival Ptolemy, son of Abubus. Simon was followed by his third son, John Hyrcanus, whose two elder brothers, Mattathias and Judah, had been murdered, together with their father.
Dec 17, 2017
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The Roman world in 50 BC after Caesar's conquest of Gallia263 viewsThe Roman world in 50 BC after Caesar's conquest of Gallia. (Note: Map doesn't show subordinate Roman client kingdoms in Anatolia and the Levant.)Nov 18, 2017
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Macedonia and the Aegean world c. 200 B.C.256 viewsMacedonia and the Aegean world c. 200 B.C.Nov 06, 2017
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Macedonia and the Aegean world c.200 B.C.304 viewsMacedonia and the Aegean world c.200 B.C.Nov 06, 2017
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Armenia, Commagene, Sophene, Osrhoene, parts of the Parthian and Roman Empires, 50 A.D.243 viewsArmenia, Commagene, Sophene, Osrhoene, and parts of the Parthian and Roman Empires, as they would have been in 50 CE.Nov 01, 2017
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Map - AD 50 Roman East244 viewsCommagene (highlighted), Sophene, Osrhoene, Armenia, and parts of the Parthian and Roman Empires, as they would have been in 50 CE.Nov 01, 2017
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Sassanian Empire 621 A.D.298 viewsThe Sasanian Persian Empire at its greatest extent, 621 A.D.Aug 18, 2017
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Kingdom of Lydia at the time of King Croesus316 viewsThe edge of the brown area is the border of Lydia at the middle of the 6th century BC, at the time of King Croesus. The red line was the 7th century BC border, roughly from 690 to 546 BC.Jul 04, 2017
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19th Century Reconstruction of Hecataeus' Map of the World384 viewsHecataeus of Miletus was an early Greek historian and geographer. He is believed to have written the first book on geography in 500 BC. He believed that the earth was a flat disk surrounded by the ocean. Jun 19, 2017
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1883 Reconstruction of Eratosthenes’ map352 viewsEratosthenes of Cyrene (276-194 BCE) invented the discipline of geography and the terminology used today. His map incorporates the information from Alexander the Great's campaigns. Eratosthenes was also the first geographer to incorporate parallels and meridians in his cartographic depictions.Jun 19, 2017
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A 1628 Reconstruction of Posidonius Ideas about the Position of Continents.361 viewsPosidonius of Apameia (c. 135–51 BCE) was a Greek Stoic philosopher that showed how the forces effected one another and also human life. He measured the Earth's circumference by using the star Canopus. He measured 240,000 stadia (24,000 miles) which is close to the actual circumference of 24,901 miles.Jun 19, 2017
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Map 635 AD Muslim-Byzantine troop movement561 viewsMuslim-Byzantine troop movement from September 635 to just before the event of the Battle of Yarmouk.

In 629, the Islamic prophet Muhammad had recently succeeded in unifying all of the nomadic tribes of the Arabian Peninsula. Those tribes had previously been too divided to pose a serious military threat to the Byzantines or the Persians. Now unified and animated by their new conversion to Islam, they comprised one of the most powerful states in the region. The first conflict between the Byzantines and Muslims was the Battle of Mu'tah in September 629. A small Muslim skirmishing force attacked the province of Arabia but were repulsed. Because the engagement was a Byzantine victory, there was no apparent reason to make changes to the military configuration of the region. Also, once the severity of the Muslim threat was realized, the Byzantines had little preceding battlefield experience with the Arabs, and even less with zealous soldiers united by a prophet. Even the Strategicon, a manual of war praised for the variety of enemies it covers, does not mention warfare against Arabs at any length. The following year the Muslims launched raids into the Arabah south of Lake Tiberias, taking Al Karak. Other raids penetrated into the Negev reaching as far as Gaza. The Battle of Yarmouk in 636 resulted in a crushing defeat for the larger Byzantine army; within three years, the Levant had been lost again. By the time of Heraclius' death in Constantinople, on February 11, 641, most of Egypt had fallen as well.
Jun 18, 2016
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Map - 1200 AD Anatolia500 viewsAD 1200 AnatoliaJun 15, 2016
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MAP - 555 AD - Byzantine Empire Under Justinian458 viewsThe Eastern Roman Empire (red) and its vassals (pink) in 555 AD during the reign of Justinian I.May 21, 2016
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Map - 413 BC The Aegean world on the eve of the Peloponnesian War690 viewsMap - 413 BC The Aegean world on the eve of the Peloponnesian WarMar 23, 2016
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Map - 310 B.C. Hellenistic World After the Break-up of Alexander's Empire689 viewsMap - 310 B.C. Hellenistic World After the Break-up of Alexander's EmpireMar 23, 2016
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Map - 300 B.C. The Hellenistic World After the Death of Antigonus667 viewsMar 23, 2016
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Map - 40 B.C. During the Peace of the Second Triumvirate of Marcus Antonius, Octavian and Lepidus685 viewsMap - 40 B.C. During the Peace of the Second Triumvirate of Marcus Antonius, Octavian and LepidusMar 23, 2016
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Map - 270 B.C. The Hellenistic Kingdoms, Greek City States, Rome and Carthage665 viewsMap - 270 B.C. The Hellenistic Kingdoms, Greek City States, Rome and CarthageMar 23, 2016
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Map - 323 B.C. Satraps of the Diadochi461 viewsThe distribution of satrapies in the Macedonian empire after the Settlement in Babylon summer fall 323 B.C.Mar 21, 2016
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Macedonian Kingdom458 viewsMap of the Macedonian kingdom. Data from M. Hatzopoulos, Macedonian Institutions under the Kings, Athens, 1996. Drawing by Marsyas.Feb 23, 2016
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Theban Hegemony 371 BC - 362 BC635 viewsAncient Thebes was the largest region in central Greece, Boeotia. The Theban general, Epaminondas, ended Spartan rule at the Battle of Leuctra in 371 BC. This made Thebes the ultimate force. Thebes is also well known for it's elite military unit of gay lovers, The Sacred Band of Thebes, who aided in the Battle of Leuctra.Jan 05, 2016
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Map - Battle of Himera 480 B.C.447 viewsThe Battle of Himera (480 BC), supposedly fought on the same day as the more famous Battle of Salamis, or at the same time as the Battle of Thermopylae, saw the Greek forces of Gelon, King of Syracuse, and Theron, tyrant of Agrigentum, defeat the Carthaginian force of Hamilcar the Magonid, ending a Carthaginian bid to restore the deposed tyrant of Himera. The battle led to the crippling of Carthage's power in Sicily for many decades. It was one of the most important battles of the Greek-Punic wars.

This representation of the Battle of Himera 480 B.C. is based on "History of Sicily Volume I" by Edward A. Freeman p. 414 -417 and "History of Sicily Volume II" by Edward A. Freeman p. 180-190.
Oct 07, 2015
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Map - The Spread of Christianity 300 - 800 A.D.510 viewsMap - The Spread of Christianity 300 - 800 A.D.Sep 17, 2015
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Map - Heraclea-Pontica in Bithynia519 viewsMap - Heraclea-Pontica in BithyniaAug 11, 2015
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Map - The Battle of Cynoscephalae in Thessaly, 2nd Macedonian War, 197 B.C. - Phase IV516 viewsThe Battle of Cynoscephalae in Thessaly, 2nd Macedonian War, Phase IV, 197 B.C.Aug 03, 2015
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Map of Hannibal's Route of Invasion, 300 B.C.475 viewsHannibal's Route of Invasion, 300 B.C.Aug 03, 2015
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Map of the Battle of Cannae, Second Punic War, South East Italy, 216 B.C.455 viewsMap of the Battle of Cannae, Second Punic War, South East Italy, 216 B.C.Aug 03, 2015
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Map - Roman Control: Italy, 1st Century B.C.808 viewsMap - Roman Control: Italy, 1st Century B.C.Aug 03, 2015
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Map - Roman Expansion: Mediterranean Basin 2nd Century B.C.752 viewsMap - Roman Expansion: Mediterranean Basin 2nd Century B.C.Aug 03, 2015
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Map - The Battle of Cynoscephalae in Thessaly, 2nd Macedonian War, 197 B.C. - Phase II460 viewsThe Battle of Cynoscephalae in Thessaly, 2nd Macedonian War, 197 B.C. - Phase IIAug 03, 2015
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Map - The Battle of Cynoscephalae in Thessaly, 2nd Macedonian War, 197 B.C. - Phase III656 viewsMap - The Battle of Cynoscephalae in Thessaly, 2nd Macedonian War, 197 B.C. - Phase IIIAug 03, 2015
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Map - Battle of Plataea, Boeotia, Summer of 479 B.C.532 viewsMap - Battle of Plataea, Boiotia, Summer of 479 B.C.Aug 03, 2015
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Map - Battle of Issus - Approach576 viewsAug 03, 2015
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Map - Battle of Granicus, 334 B.C.484 viewsAug 03, 2015
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Map - Roman Expansion 326 B.C.739 viewsMap - Roman Expansion 326 B.C.Aug 03, 2015
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