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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Anatolia ▸ Mysia ▸ LampsakosView Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Coins of Lampsakos, Mysia

Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth. Lampsacus was notable for its worship of Priapus, who was said to have been born there.


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS84664. Silver drachm, Price 1382, Müller Alexander 612, SNG Cop 887, SNG Alpha Bank 578, SNG Saroglos 705, ADM II series X, SNG Munchen -, VF/gF, nice style, well centered on a tight flan, toned, reverse double struck, scratches and marks, some porosity, weight 4.094 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on backless throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, lotus tipped long scepter vertical in left hand, forepart of Pegasos left, No monogram under throne; $180.00 (€160.20)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Alexander

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Struck after Alexander's death, by Leonnatos, Arrhidaios, or Antigonos I Monophthalmos, during the joint reign of Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother, Philip III, and Alexander's infant son with Roxana, Alexander IV. Lampsakos also struck coins during this period in the name of Philip. Traditionally coins naming Alexander have been attributed to Alexander III the Great, but undoubtedly the Alexander named on this coin was the infant son of Roxana, Alexander IV. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who only intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Olympias was Alexander the Great's mother and Alexander IV's grandmother, but not Philip III's mother. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by the boy's regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C.
GS75271. Silver drachm, Unpublished; Price 1521A var. (MH over wreath, monogram ΠP under throne different form), Hersh -, et al. -, VF, nice style, bumps and marks, weight 4.107 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 90o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, wreath over MH monogram left, ΠP below throne; very rare; $160.00 (€142.40)
 


Lampsakos, Mysia, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C.

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This type is apparently missing from the major references and collections but we have handled several and know of about a dozen. The styles vary considerably, indicating they may have been struck over a long period. The mint city is not certain.
GA90771. Silver hemiobol, SNG BnF -, SNG Keckman -, SNG Kayhan -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Mysia -, Rosen -, Klein -, VF, weight 0.444 g, maximum diameter 9.0 mm, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 5th - 4th century B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in Corinthian helmet; reverse star of four rays and four pellets surrounding central pellet; ex Forum (2010); very rare; $115.00 (€102.35)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Philip

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Herakles is most often depicted on coinage wearing the scalp of the Nemean lion over his head. The first of Herakles' twelve labors, set by his cousin King Eurystheus, was to slay the Nemean lion and bring back its skin. Herakles discovered arrows and his club were useless against it because its golden fur was impervious to mortal weapons. Its claws were sharper than swords and could cut through any armor. Herakles stunned the beast with his club and, using his immense strength, strangled it to death. During the fight, the lion bit off one of his fingers. After slaying the lion, he tried to skin it with a knife from his belt but failed. Wise Athena, noticing the hero's plight, told him to use one of the lion's own claws to skin the pelt.
GS77213. Silver drachm, ADM II series IX, 173; Price P16; Müller Alexander -; SNG Cop -; SNG Munchen -; SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, obverse off-center, porosity, weight 4.075 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 270o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 319 - 317 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long lotus topped scepter vertical behind in left hand, buckle left, crescent over A under throne; struck under Leonnatos, Arrhidaios, or Antigonos I Monophthalmos; $110.00 (€97.90)
 


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Lampsakos, Mysia

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RPC identifies this ruler as Uncertain Emperor (Tiberius?) while SNG Copenhagen says Tiberius. The portrait does look like Tiberius.
GB90185. Bronze AE 16, RPC I 2279, SNG Cop 233, BMC Mysia -, F, weight 3.804 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 225o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, obverse CEBAC, laureate head right; reverse ΛAMΨAKH, forepart of Pegasos right; rare; $100.00 (€89.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

Click for a larger photo
Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS77605. Silver drachm, Price 1387, Müller Alexander 614, SNG Cop 888, SNG Alpha Bank 582, SNG Munchen 451, aVF, scratches and marks, porosity, weight 4.051 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 270o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle extended in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, Pegasos forepart left in left field, Artemis standing left holding torch under throne; $100.00 (€89.00)
 


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Lampsakos, Mysia

Click for a larger photo
RPC identifies this ruler as "Uncertain Emperor (Tiberius?)" while SNG Copenhagen says "Tiberius." The portrait does look like Tiberius.
RH90508. Bronze AE 15, RPC I 2279, SNG Cop 233, BMC Mysia -, VF, weight 4.856 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsacus (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 19 Aug 14 - 16 Mar 37 A.D.; obverse CEBAC, laureate head right; reverse ΛAMΨAKH, forepart of Pegasos right, uncertain object below; scarce; $75.00 (€66.75)
 







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REFERENCES

ANS Collections Database - http://numismatics.org/search/
Baldwin, A. Lampsakos: The Gold Staters, Silver and Bronze Coinages. AJN 53. (1924).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - ).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol. III, Part 1. (London, 1926).
Gaebler, H. Die antiken Münzen von Makedonia und Paionia, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. III. (Berlin, 1935).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Syrian Coins, Royal and Civic Issues, Fourth to First Centuries BC. HGC 9. (Lancaster, PA, 2009).
Houghton, A., C. Lorber & O. Hoover. Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalog. (Lancaster, 2002 - 2008).
Müller, L. Die Münzen Des Thracishen Konigs Lysimacus. (Copenhagen, 1858).
Müller, L. Numismatique d'Alexandre le Grand; Appendice les monnaies de Philippe II et III, et Lysimaque. (Copenhagen, 1855-58).
Price, M. The Coinage in the name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. (Zurich-London, 1991).
von Prokesh-Osten, A. "Liste des Alexandres de ma collection qui ne se trouvent pas dans le catalogue de Mr. L. Müller" in NZ 1 (Constantinople, 1869). pp. 31 - 64.
RPC Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 4: Bosporus-Lesbos. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 19: Troas - Lesbos. (Berlin, 1991).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 4: Mysien-Ionien. (Berlin, 1989).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 1: Pontus, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Mysia, Troas, Aiolis, Lesbos, Ionia. (Berlin, 1957).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque Nationale, Cabinet des Médailles, Vol. 5: Mysia. (Paris, 2001).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque National, Collection Jean et Marie Delepierre. (Paris, 1983).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 6: Asia Minor: Pontus - Phrygia. (London, 1965).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain V, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. (London. 1951 - 2008).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, Univ. of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain-Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece 2. The Alpha Bank Collection. Macedonia I: Alexander I - Perseus. (Athens, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 1: The Muharrem Kayhan Collection. (Istanbul, 2002).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, United States, Burton Y. Berry Collection, Part 2. Megaris to Egypt. (New York, 1962).
Thompson, M. Alexander's Drachm Mints II: Lampsacus and Abydus. ANSNS 19 (1991).
Thompson, M. "The Mints of Lysimachus" in Essays Robinson, pp. 163 - 182, pls. 16 - 22.
Thompson, M., & A. Bellinger. Greek Coins in the Yale Collection, IV: A Hoard of Alexander Drachms. Yale Classical Studies 14. (1955).
Waggoner, N. Early Greek Coins from the Collection of Jonathan P. Rosen. ACNAC 5. (New York, 1983).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Mysia. (London, 1892).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, July 25, 2017.
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Lampsakos