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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Severan Period ▸ Julia DomnaView Options:  |  |  | 

Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

Julia Domna was the second wife of Septimius Severus and mother of Caracalla and Geta. An intelligent, talented and beautiful woman, Julia Domna exercised great influence during her husband's reign and practically administered the empire for her sons. In 217 A.D. after the assassination of Caracalla, she possibly committed suicide by starvation or she died of breast cancer.


Julia Domna, Augusta, 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Julia Domna and her children as Terra and the Four Seasons! "The flatterers of Julia Domna pretended that all things were owing to her. The star-besprinkled globe represents the Roman world, which with her husband Septimius Severus she governed; and to the empire of which she destines her two sons, Caracalla and Geta, who, together with as many daughters, are the proof of her fecundity." -- Rasche, T. ii pl l p 932.
RS85789. Silver denarius, RIC IV S549 (R), RSC III 35, BMCRE V S21, Hunter III S22, SRCV II 6579, F, well centered, slightly rough with light even corrosion, edge cracks, weight 2.369 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 207 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, bun at back of head; reverse FECVNDITAS (fertility), Terra reclining left under a vine, nude to the waist, right hand set on globe spangled with stars, leaning on left arm on basket of fruits, in background four children representing the four seasons; rare; $200.00 (170.00)


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Vesta was originally a household spirit. Later she was personified as the goddess of the hearth and given the stature of her Greek equivalent, Hestia. In the temple of Vesta her flame was kept alive by Vestal Virgins.
RS86667. Silver denarius, RIC IV C390, RSC III 230, BMCRE V C29, Hunter III C10, SRCV II 7108, Choice aEF, superb portrait, well centered, light toning, reverse die wear, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.246 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, reign of Caracalla, 211 - 217 A.D.; obverse IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, looped plait from ear around back of neck; reverse VESTA, Vesta standing facing, head left, veiled, palladium in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $120.00 (102.00)


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Cybele was born a hermaphrodite, but castrated by the gods, she became female. Heeding the Sibylline oracle, the senate brought her worship to Rome in 204 B.C. as the first officially sanctioned Eastern cult. After approval, they were dismayed to learn that the priesthood required voluntary self-castration, which was abhorrent to the Romans. Romans were barred from entering the priesthood or even entering the priest's sanctuary. The eunuch priests, recruited from outside Rome, were confined to their sanctuary, leaving only to parade in the streets during festivals in April. Claudius removed the bans on Roman participation, making worship of Cybele and her consort Attis part of the state religion.
RS89456. Silver denarius, RIC IV S564; RSC III 123; BMCRE V p. 163, S51; Hunter III p. 42, S11; SRCV II 6593, Choice VF, well centered and struck, a few light marks, small coppery spots, edge cracks, weight 3.380 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 205 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse MATER DEVM (mother of the gods), Cybele seated left between two lions, wearing towered crown, branch in right hand, scepter in left hand, resting left arm on drum; scarce; $110.00 (93.50)


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Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Moneta, Juno Sospita, and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Regina, "Juno the Queen." Juno is usually shown holding a patera, scepter or a statuette of Athena, and is often accompanied by a peacock.
RS88029. Silver denarius, RIC IV S560; RSC III 97; BMCRE p. 162, 42; cf. SRCV II 6589 (Laodicea); Hunter III -, VF, toned, tight flan cutting off much of legends, weight 3.082 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 196 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left, veiled, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, peacock at feet on left; $70.00 (59.50)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior

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The first of Herakles' twelve labors, set by his cousin King Eurystheus, was to slay the Nemean lion and bring back its skin. It could not be killed with mortal weapons because its golden fur was impervious to attack. Its claws were sharper than swords and could cut through any armor. Herakles stunned the beast with his club and, using his immense strength, strangled it to death. During the fight, the lion bit off one of his fingers. After slaying the lion, he tried to skin it with a knife from his belt but failed. Wise Athena, noticing the hero's plight, told him to use one of the lion's own claws to skin the pelt.
RP88188. Bronze AE 20, H-J Marcianopolis 6.17.14.1, AMNG I/I 606, Moushmov 419, Varbanov I -, SNG Cop -, SNG Budapest -, F, well centered, dark patina, rough, central cavities, weight 3.856 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, Markianopolis (Devnya, Bulgaria) mint, 194 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse IOVΛIA ∆OMNA CEB, draped bust right; reverse MAPKIANO-ΠOΛOIT-ΩN, Hercules standing right fighting the Nemean lion; rare; $60.00 (51.00)







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OBVERSE LEGENDS

DIVAIVLIAAVGVSTA
IVLADOMNAAVG
IVLIAAVGVSTA
IVLIADOMINAAVG
IVLIADOMNAAVG
IVLIADOMNAAVGVSTA
IVLIAPIAFELIXAVG
IVLIAPIAMATERCASTR


REFERENCES

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calic, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. II: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cayn, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. III: De Marco Aurelio a Caracalla (Del 161 d.C. al 217 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 4: Septimius Severus to Maximinus Thrax. (Paris, 1884).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. IV: From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 5: Pertinax to Elagabalus. (London, 1950).
Online Coins of the Roman Empire (OCRE) http://numismatics.org/ocre/
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & Sear, D. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. III, Pertinax to Balbinus and Pupienus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, March 19, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Julia Domna