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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Severan Period ▸ Julia DomnaView Options:  |  |  | 

Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

Julia Domna was the second wife of Septimius Severus and mother of Caracalla and Geta. An intelligent, talented and beautiful woman, Julia Domna exercised great influence during her husband's reign and practically administered the empire for her sons. In 217 A.D. after the assassination of Caracalla, she possibly committed suicide by starvation or she died of breast cancer.


Julia Domna, Augusta, 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Julia Domna and her children as Terra and the Four Seasons! "The flatterers of Julia Domna pretended that all things were owing to her. The star-besprinkled globe represents the Roman world, which with her husband Septimius Severus she governed; and to the empire of which she destines her two sons, Caracalla and Geta, who, together with as many daughters, are the proof of her fecundity." -- Rasche, T. ii pl l p 932.
RS85789. Silver denarius, RIC IV S549 (R), RSC III 35, BMCRE V S21, Hunter III S22, SRCV II 6579, F, well centered, slightly rough with light even corrosion, edge cracks, weight 2.369 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 207 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, bun at back of head; reverse FECVNDITAS (fertility), Terra reclining left under a vine, nude to the waist, right hand set on globe spangled with stars, leaning on left arm on basket of fruits, in background four children representing the four seasons; rare; $200.00 (170.00)


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Vesta was originally a household spirit. Later she was personified as the goddess of the hearth and given the stature of her Greek equivalent, Hestia. In the temple of Vesta her flame was kept alive by Vestal Virgins.
RS86667. Silver denarius, RIC IV C390, RSC III 230, BMCRE V C29, Hunter III C10, SRCV II 7108, Choice aEF, superb portrait, well centered, light toning, reverse die wear, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.246 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, reign of Caracalla, 211 - 217 A.D.; obverse IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, looped plait from ear around back of neck; reverse VESTA, Vesta standing facing, head left, veiled, palladium in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $150.00 (127.50)


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Hera (Juno to the Romans) is the wife and one of three sisters of Zeus in the Olympian pantheon of Greek mythology and religion. Hera's mother is Rhea and her father Cronus. Her chief function was as the goddess of women and marriage. The cow, lion and the peacock were considered sacred to her. Portrayed as majestic and solemn, often enthroned, and crowned with the kalathos. Hera was known for her jealous and vengeful nature against Zeus' lovers and offspring, but also against mortals who crossed her. Paris earned Hera's hatred by choosing Aphrodite as the most beautiful goddess.
RB79848. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV C585, BMCRE V C208, Hunter III , Cohen IV 90, SRCV II 7114, F, scratches, areas of corrosion, weight 21.909 g, maximum diameter 30.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 211 - 217 A.D.; obverse IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane, hair in horizontal ridges, small flat coil at back of head, looped plait on neck; reverse IVNONEM, Juno standing slightly left, veiled head left, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, peacock at feet on left standing left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field below center; scarce; $140.00 (119.00)


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Pietas in traditional Latin usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man or woman with pietas respected his or her responsibilities to the gods, family, other people and entities (such as the state), and understood his or her place in society with respect to others.
RS79616. Silver denarius, RIC IV S572, BMCRE V S165, RSC III 150, Hunter III 16, SRCV II 6600, VF, nice portrait, full circles centering on obverse and reverse, some die wear, flan cracks, weight 3.543 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 204 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, flat coil at back of head; reverse PIETAS AVGG (to the piety of the two emperors), Pietas standing half left, veiled, dropping incense on altar with right hand, box in left hand; $85.00 (72.25)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Moneta, Juno Sospita, and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Regina, "Juno the Queen." Juno is usually shown holding a patera, scepter or a statuette of Athena, and is often accompanied by a peacock.
RS87530. Silver denarius, RIC IV S560; RSC III 97; BMCRE p. 162, 42; cf. SRCV II 6589 (Laodicea), VF/F, attractive portrait, toned, tiny encrustations, light bumps and marks, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.564 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 196 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left, veiled, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, peacock at feet on left; $70.00 (59.50)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Vesta was originally a household spirit. Later she was personified as the goddess of the hearth and given the stature of her Greek equivalent, Hestia. In the temple of Vesta her flame was kept alive by Vestal Virgins.
RB87542. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV C593 (S); BMCRE p. 470, 217; Cohen IV 228; Banti 52; SRCV II 7123; Hunter III -, F/aF, centered, nice portrait, marks, porosity, areas of corrosion, weight 19.318 g, maximum diameter 31.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, struck under Caracalla, c. 211 - 215 A.D.; obverse IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane, hair in waved horizontal ridges, looped plait on neck; reverse VESTA, Vest seated left on throne, simpulum (ladle used for sacrifices) in right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; scarce; $50.00 (42.50)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Fortuna distributed good and evil among mankind according to her caprice and without any regard to merit.
RS87529. Fouree silver plated denarius, cf. RSC III 55, RIC IV S552, BMCRE V S24, SRCV II 6583 (official, silver, Rome mint, 210 A.D.), VF, nice portrait, dark toning, bumps and scratches, edge chips, areas of exposed base metal core, weight 2.224 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 180o, unofficial criminal mint, c. 210 - 215 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse FORTVNAE FELICI (to happy Fortuna), Fortuna standing slightly left, head left, out-turned cornucopia in right, left elbow rests on reversed rudder; $32.00 (27.20)







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OBVERSE LEGENDS

DIVAIVLIAAVGVSTA
IVLADOMNAAVG
IVLIAAVGVSTA
IVLIADOMINAAVG
IVLIADOMNAAVG
IVLIADOMNAAVGVSTA
IVLIAPIAFELIXAVG
IVLIAPIAMATERCASTR


REFERENCES

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calic, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. II: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cayn, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. III: De Marco Aurelio a Caracalla (Del 161 d.C. al 217 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 4: Septimius Severus to Maximinus Thrax. (Paris, 1884).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. IV: From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 5: Pertinax to Elagabalus. (London, 1950).
Online Coins of the Roman Empire (OCRE) http://numismatics.org/ocre/
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & Sear, D. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. III, Pertinax to Balbinus and Pupienus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, November 14, 2018.
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Roman Coins of Julia Domna