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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Denominations ▸ Eastern DenariiView Options:  |  |  | 

Eastern Denarii

Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG XI

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This may have been a legion raised by Antony and disbanded by Augustus. The XI Claudia, an old legion of Caesar's, fought for Octavian (and won the title Actiaca at the battle of Actium).
SL79267. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/25, Sydenham 1229, BMCRR II East 203, RSC I 39, NGC F, strike 3/5, surface 2/5, banker's marks (2400602-008), toned, weight 3.48 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - XI, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; NGC certified (slabbed); $450.00 (400.50)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Julia Domna was born in Emesa in 170 A.D. She was the youngest daughter of high-priest Julius Bassianus, a descendant of the Royal House of Emesa. Emesa was famous for its Temple of the Sun, the center of worship for the ancient pagan cult El-Gebal (or Elagabal). El-Gebal, worshiped in the form of a conical black stone, was the Aramaic name for the Syrian Sun God and means God of the Mountain. Emesa was also the birthplace of three other Roman empresses, Julia Maesa, Julia Mamaea and Julia Soaemias, and one emperor, Julia Domna's nephew, Elagabalus.
RS84440. Silver denarius, RSC III 65, RIC IV S624 (S), BMCRE p. 103 note citing Cohen 65 (Hamburger Coll.), SRCV II -, VF, nice style, toned, porous, light marks, small deposits, weight 3.239 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 45o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse IVLIA DOMNA AVG, draped bust right; reverse FORTVN REDVC, Fortuna seated left on throne without back, kalathos on head, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ; rare; $150.00 (133.50)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RS77438. Silver denarius, RIC IV 526; RSC III 102; BMCRE V p. 299, 732; Hunter III 202; SRCV II -, VF, nice eastern style, weight 2.858 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 195o, Laodicea ad Mar (Latakia, Syria) mint, 202 A.D.; obverse SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse COS III P P, Victory advancing left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand; $135.00 (120.15)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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Bonus Eventus, the god of good outcomes, was originally worshiped by the Romans as a deity especially presiding over agriculture and successful harvests. During the Imperial era, he was associated with other types of success. The epithet Bonus, "the Good," is used with other abstract deities such as Bona Fortuna ("Good Fortune"), Bona Mens ("Good Thinking" or "Sound Mind"), and Bona Spes ("Good Hope," perhaps to be translated as "optimism"), as well as with the mysterious and multivalent Bona Dea, a goddess whose rites were celebrated by women.
RS76958. Silver denarius, SRCV II 6267, RIC IV 369, RSC III 68, BMCRE V 343, VF, excellent eastern style portrait, some light corrosion, weight 2.130 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse BONI EVENTVS, Bonus Eventus standing left, basket of fruit in right, two heads of grain in left; $125.00 (111.25)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C.

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Mark Antony was Julius Caesar's friend and military commander. After Caesar's assassination in 44 B.C., Antony joined Lepidus and Octavian in the Second Triumvirate, a three-man dictatorship. They defeated Caesar's assassins at the Battle of Philippi in 42 B.C. and divided the Republic among themselves. Antony took the east, including Egypt, ruled by Queen Cleopatra. Relations within the Triumvirate were strained but civil war was averted when Antony married Octavian's sister, Octavia. Despite the marriage, Antony continued an affair with Cleopatra and even married her. In 31 B.C., at Octavian's direction, the Roman Senate declared war on Cleopatra and proclaimed Antony a traitor. Octavian defeated Antony at the Battle of Actium the same year. Defeated, Antony and Cleopatra fled back to Egypt where they committed suicide. Octavian was then the undisputed master of the Roman world and would reign as the first Roman emperor with the title Augustus.
RR75376. Silver denarius, cf. Crawford 544/14, Sydenham 1216, BMCRR II East 190, RSC I 27 ff., Fair, weight 2.930 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 45o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - [...], aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; $100.00 (89.00)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.

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In 231, Severus Alexander led a formidable army into the east. In a great battle Alexander defeated Artaxerxes and drove him back from the frontiers of Rome. He returned to Rome, where he received a triumph for his victory over the Persians.
RS73592. Silver denarius, RSC III 561, RIC IV 302, BMCRE VI 1020, Hunter III 190 var. (no cuirass), cf. SRCV II 7930 (obv legend, star right on rev, etc.), VF, well centered, interesting eastern style, weight 2.643 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 228 - 231 A.D.; obverse IMP SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate and draped bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVG (the victory of the Emperor), Victory advancing right, wreath raised in right hand, palm frond in left over shoulder; $95.00 (84.55)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.

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Julia Maesa ruled as regent for Severus Alexander until her death in 223 or 224. Upon her death power passed to Julia Mamaea, the young emperor's mother. Mamaea governed moderately, advised by a council of 16 distinguished senators. Rome had difficulty accepting rule by a woman. There were numerous plots and revolts, the last of which ended with the murder of the emperor and his mother.
RS90497. Silver denarius, RSC III 470, RIC IV 271, SRCV II 7918, BMCRE VI 1063 note, VF, well centered on a broad flan, some porosity, minor edge crack, weight 2.511 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 223 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PONTIF MAX TR P II COS II P P (high priest, tribune of the people for two years, consul for the second time, father of the country), Roma seated left on throne, Victory in extended right hand, reversed spear in left, shield rests on the ground beside the throne; scarce; $70.00 (62.30)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.

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This type imitates the Caius and Lucius Caesar reverse of Augustus. It refers to the joint consulate of Valerian and Gallienus in 257 A.D.
RS76533. Billon antoninianus, RIC V 277 (S, Antioch), RSC IV 169, Gbl MIR 1598a (Antioch), Hunter IV 70, SRCV III 9962, gVF, good metal for the type, slightly off-center, edge crack, weight 3.615 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, eastern field mint, 257 A.D.; obverse IMP VALERIANVS AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse P M TR P V COS IIII P P, Valerian and Gallienus standing confronted, laureate and togate, holding two shields on the ground between them, two spears upright behind shields; scarce; $50.00 (44.50)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars - redux means "coming back" or "returning." She may be one of the later aspects of Fortuna, as the earliest mention of her is on an altar dedicated by the Senate in 19 B.C. for the safe return of Emperor Augustus.
RS77363. Silver denarius, RIC IV 377 (S); RSC III 174a; Hunter III 178; BMCRE p. 92, 352; SRCV II -, aVF, nice exotic Emesa style, porous, weight 3.029 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 - 195 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse FORTVN REDVC, Fortuna standing facing, head left, kalathos on head, rudder held by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; scarce; $50.00 (44.50)







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Catalog current as of Monday, April 24, 2017.
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Eastern Denarii