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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Late Empire ▸ ProcopiusView Options:  |  |  | 

Procopius, 28 September 365 - 27 May 366 A.D.

Procopius was a member of the Constantinian dynasty and a general under Julian II. Some contemporary historians of Procopius claim that Julian II had meant for the general to succeed him instead of Jovian. Whether true or not, Jovian gained the throne and Procopius retired. After Jovian died, the next emperors, Valentinian and Valens, had Procopius arrested. Procopius escaped and, on 28 September 365, bribed two legions passing by Constantinople, proclaimed himself emperor, and took control of Thrace and Bithynia. In April 366, Valens defeated the troops of Procopius in the Battle of Thyatira in Phrygia, ending his revolt. Procopius fled the battlefield, but was captured at Nacoleia and executed on 27 May 366.


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Procopius was a member of the Constantinian dynasty and a general under Julian II. Some contemporary historians of Procopius claim that Julian II had meant for the general to succeed him instead of Jovian. Whether true or not, Jovian gained the throne and Procopius retired. After Jovian died, the next emperors, Valentinian and Valens, had Procopius arrested. Procopius escaped and, on 28 September 365, bribed two legions passing by Constantinople, proclaimed himself emperor, and took control of Thrace and Bithynia. In April 366, Valens defeated the troops of Procopius in the Battle of Thyatira in Phrygia, ending his revolt. Procopius fled the battlefield but was captured at Nacoleia and executed on 27 May 366.
RL84226. Bronze centenionalis, see CNG e-auction 268, lot 413 (no object left); cf. RIC IX Constantinopolis 17(a), LRBC II 2081, SRCV V 19883, Cohen VIII 8 (all bust left), aVF, dark green patina with earthen deposits, tight flan, edge cracks, light scratches, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.544 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - 27 May 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing slightly left, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, uncertain object at feet on left, CONSE in exergue; apparently unpublished, extremely rare with bust right; $140.00 (119.00)


Procopius, 28 September 365 - 27 May 366 A.D.

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The variant with a branch in the left field is considerably scarcer than the usual "indeterminate object" or blank field. In addition, this officina is not listed in RIC.
RL85662. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Constantinopolis 17b (R3) var. (unlisted officina), LRBC II 2084, Cohen VIII 9, SRCV V 19882, VF, weight 3.566 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, palm frond left, Christogram above right, CONSB in exergue; very rare; $140.00 (119.00)


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According to Zosimus, Julian gave Procopius an imperial robe, informing him of his intent to make him his successor. But Julian did not tell anyone of this intent and Jovian was acclaimed emperor. Procopius gave Jovian the robe. He told Jovian of Julian's intention but asked the new Emperor to allow him to retire to private life. Jovian accepted and Procopius and his family retired to Caesarea Mazaca.
RL79986. Bronze centenionalis, LRBC II 2081, RIC IX 17a, Cohen VIII 8, SRCV V 19883, gVF, excellent portrait, nice green patina, edge chip, weight 2.661 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, object on ground to left, Christogram above right, CONSΓ in exergue; rare; $135.00 (114.75)


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Procopius was a member of the Constantinian dynasty and general under Julian II. On 28 Sep 365, during the rule of Valentinian and Valens, he bribed two legions passing by Constantinople and proclaimed himself emperor. In April 366, Valens defeated Procopius in the Battle of Thyatira, ending his revolt. Procopius fled, but was later captured and executed.
RL74567. Bronze centenionalis, LRBC II 2082, RIC IX Constantinopolis 17(a)6 (R2), Cohen VIII 8, SRCV V 19883, aVF, green patina, typical tight flan, light marks, scratches and corrosion, weight 3.116 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 345o, 1st officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed draped and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, uncertain object at feet, Chi-Rho in upper right field, CONSA in exergue; rare; $105.00 (89.25)


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After Jovian's death, the new emperors, Valentinian I and Valens, sent some soldiers to arrest Procopius. He surrendered, but asked to meet his family; he had his captors dine and drink, and then seized the opportunity to flee with his family, first to the Black Sea and later to the Tauric Chersonese, where they hid. However, Procopius feared a betrayal, and decide to go to Constantinople and to declare himself Emperor.
RL74066. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Heraclea 7, LRBC II 1930, Cohen VIII 9, SRCV V 19881, VF, green patina, well centered on a somewhat ragged flan, weight 3.928 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, 9th officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, chi-rho Christogram above right, pellet lower right, SMHΘ exergue; rare; $100.00 (85.00)







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REFERENCES

Carson, R., P. Hill & J. Kent. Late Roman Bronze Coinage. (London, 1960).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 8: Nepotian to Romulus Augustus, plus tesserae & cotorniates. (Paris, 1888).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Constantin II Zenon (337-491). Moneta 5. (Wetteren, 1996).
Hahn, Wolfgang. Moneta Imperii Romani-Byzantinii. (Vienna, 1989).
King, C.E. & D.R. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Pearce, J.W.E. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Volume IX, Valentinian I - Theodosius I. (London 1933).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. V: The Christian Empire...Constantine II to Zeno, AD 337 - 491. (London, 2014).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, November 21, 2017.
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Roman Coins of Procopius