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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Mysia| ▸ |Cyzicus||View Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Greek Coins of Kyzikos, Mysia

Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world. It was said to have been founded by Pelasgians from Thessaly, according to tradition at the coming of the Argonauts; later, allegedly in 756 B.C., it received many colonists from Miletus. Owing to its advantageous position it speedily acquired commercial importance, and the gold staters of Cyzicus were a staple currency in the ancient world till they were superseded by those of Philip of Macedon. During the Peloponnesian War (431-404 B.C.) Cyzicus was subject to the Athenians and Lacedaemonians alternately. In the naval Battle of Cyzicus in 410, an Athenian fleet completely destroyed a Spartan fleet. At the peace of Antalcidas in 387, like the other Greek cities in Asia, it was made over to Persia. Alexander the Great captured it from the Persians in 334 B.C. In 74 B.C. allied with Rome, it withstood a siege by 300,000 men led by King Mithridates VI of Pontus. Rome rewarded this loyalty with territory and with municipal independence which lasted until the reign of Tiberius. When it was incorporated into the Empire, Cyzicus was made the capital of Mysia, and afterward of Hellespontus. Gallienus opened an imperial mint at Cyzicus, which continued to strike coins well into the Byzantine era. The site of Cyzicus, located on the Erdek and Bandirma roads, is protected by Turkey's Ministry of Culture.

Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 500 - 450 B.C.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |500| |-| |450| |B.C.|, |hekte|
Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world. It was said to have been founded by Pelasgians from Thessaly, according to tradition at the coming of the Argonauts; later, allegedly in 756 B.C., it received many colonists from Miletus. Owing to its advantageous position it speedily acquired commercial importance, and the gold staters of Cyzicus were a staple currency in the ancient world till they were superseded by those of Philip of Macedon. The site of Cyzicus, located on the Erdek and Bandirma roads, is protected by Turkey's Ministry of Culture.
SL89446. Electrum hekte, SNG BnF 241; SNGvA 1180; BMC Mysia p. 32, 98; Von Fritze I 102; Rosen 482; de Luynes pl. XCII 2460; SNG Cop -, NGC XF, strike 3/5, surface 3/5 (2490378-004), weight 2.674 g, maximum diameter 11.4 mm, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 500 - 450 B.C.; obverse satyr left, tunny fish vertical with head down to left; reverse quadripartite incuse square; NGC| Lookup; extremely rare; $900.00 SALE |PRICE| $810.00
 


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.|, |follis|
Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. Emperors frequently made vows to Jupiter for protection. The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored emperors and kings, those in positions of authority similar to his own.
RL93356. Billon follis, RIC VI Cyzicus 80, Cohen VII 303, SRCV IV 15956, Hunter V 344 var. (2nd officina), Choice gVF, well centered, nice portrait, weight 6.555 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 311 - 313 A.D.; obverse FL VAL CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG (to Jove the protector of the two Emperors), Jupiter standing slightly left, head left, globe in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, eagle at feet left with head right and wreath in beak, MKVA in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00
 


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Cyzicus, Mysia, Poppaea or Statilia Messalina Reverse

|Cyzicus|, |Nero,| |13| |October| |54| |-| |9| |June| |68| |A.D.,| |Cyzicus,| |Mysia,| |Poppaea| |or| |Statilia| |Messalina| |Reverse|, |AE| |16|
RPC I notes, "although certainty is not at the moment possible (because of the small size and relatively poor preservation of the coins), the portrait of Nero seems to be the "steps" portrait, introduced in 63. If so, the bust should be that of Poppaea (or possibly Statilia Messalina)." In 62 A.D., Nero divorced Octavia and married Poppaea. In the summer of 65, Nero and Poppaea quarreled. She was pregnant. In a fit of rage, Nero kicked her in the abdomen, killing her. Statilia Messalina was already Nero's mistress. After Poppaea's death, Nero forced Statilia's husband to commit suicide, so he could marry her. Statilia kept a low profile in public and survived the fall of his reign. After Nero's death, Otho promised to marry her, before his suicide in 69.
RP85905. Bronze AE 16, RPC I 2249 (3 spec.), BMC Mysia -, SNG BnF -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Hunterian -, SNG Tübingen -, Lindgren -, aF, green patina, weight 3.390 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 0o, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 63 - 65 A.D.; obverse NEPΩN (counterclockwise on right), bare head of Nero right, ΦY monogram behind; reverse K-Y-Z (K over Z in left field, Z appearing as I, Y in right field), draped bust of empress right; only one specimen on Coin Archives; extremely rare; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00
 


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 475 - 450 B.C.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |475| |-| |450| |B.C.|, |obol|
During the Peloponnesian War 431-404 B.C. Cyzicus was subject to the Athenians and Lacedaemonians alternately. In the naval Battle of Cyzicus in 410, an Athenian fleet routed and completely destroyed a Spartan fleet. At the peace of Antalcidas in 387 B.C., like the other Greek cities in Asia, it was made over to Persia. Alexander the Great later captured it from the Persians in 334 B.C.
GS92955. Silver obol, SNG Cop 50; SNGvA 1215; SNG Tüb 2228, BMC Mysia p. 35, 121; Klein 266; SNG Kayhan -, VF, toned, tight oval flan, light corrosion, weight 0.741 g, maximum diameter 10.6 mm, die axis 180o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 475 - 450 B.C.; obverse forepart of boar running left, tunny fish upwards behind; reverse head of roaring lion left, backward K above left, all in incuse square; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00
 


Aurelian, August or September 270 - October or November 275 A.D.

|Aurelian|, |Aurelian,| |August| |or| |September| |270| |-| |October| |or| |November| |275| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
In 274, Rome greeted Aurelian as Restitutor Orbis ("Restorer of the World") and accorded him a magnificent triumph (victory procession), which was graced by his captives Tetricus I and his son Tetricus II. Aurelian's conquests of the Palmyran Empire and the Gallic Empire reunited the Roman Empire.
MA95481. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC T2983, BnF XII 1174, RIC V-1 349 corr., Venèra 10326 - 10328, Maravielle 651, Choice VF, well centered, small edge splits, weight 3.889 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, issue 7, phase 3, autumn 272 – early 273; obverse IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse RESTITVTOR ORBIS (to the restorer of the world), Aurelian on right, holding scepter in left, standing left, extending right to woman who crowns him, suppliant right in center, * Γ in exergue; scarce; $40.00 (€36.80)


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 1st Century B.C.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|, |AE| |20|
In 74 B.C. Cyzicus, allied with Rome, withstood a siege by King Mithridates VI of Pontus. Rome rewarded this loyalty with territory and with municipal independence which lasted until the reign of Tiberius. When it was incorporated into the Empire, it was made the capital of Mysia, afterward of Hellespontus. Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world.
GB91361. Bronze AE 20, cf. SNG BnF 464 var. (H below), SNGvA 1235 (uncertain letter below); SNG Cop 72 (same); BMC Mysia p. 39, 151 (same), F, attractive green patina, well centered, some scattered porosity, light earthen deposits, weight 5.687 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 0o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 1st century B.C.; obverse bust of Kore Soteira right, wreathed with grain; reverse KY/ZI in two lines, monogram at center, all inside oak wreath, uncertain Greek letter below wreath; $36.00 SALE |PRICE| $32.40
 







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REFERENCES|

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