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Home>Catalog>CollectingThemes>Personifications>Money PAGE 1/212»»»

Money (Moneta)

Coins about...money! One of our favorite collecting themes. Roman propaganda often recorded largesses (represented by Liberalitas) on coins. She is usually depicted holding what was traditionally described as an abacus, a counting board. The object is also described as a tessera, type of banner, showing a number of painted marks equal to the number of aurei or denarii offered. Curtis Clay suggested it is actually a money shovel, a wooden shovel with shallow round depressions which could extract the exact number of coins needed from a chest. Another popular type is that of Moneta holding scales. One quite interesting coin is the Republic denarius of T.Carisius depicting mint tools: an anvil, tongs, a hammer and a die.


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.
Click for a larger photo LIBERALITAS coins commemorate largesses, distributions of money to the people of Rome, usually made upon important events or the return of the emperor after a longer absence. This coin commemorates Antoninus' fourth Liberalitas.
RB72532. Orichalcum sestertius, SRCV III 4187, RIC III 774, BMCRE IV 1688, Cohen II 498, gF, porous, weight 23.165 g, maximum diameter 30.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 145 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P, laureate head right; reverse COS IIII above, LIBERALITAS AVG IIII in exergue, Antoninus Pius seated left on platform, Liberalitas on left holding abacus and cornucopia, officer behind; citizen standing below holding fold of drapery with both hands to receive donation from the emperor. S - C flanking across field; ex Forum (2012); rare; $225.00 (€168.75)

Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Emesa was famous for its Temple of the Sun, the center of worship for the ancient pagan cult El-Gebal (or Elagabal). El-Gebal, worshipped in the form of a conical black stone, was the Aramaic name for the Syrian Sun God and means God of the Mountain. Julia Domna was born in Emesa in 170 A.D. She was the youngest daughter of high-priest Julius Bassianus, a descendant of the Royal House of Emesa.
RS65354. Silver denarius, RSC III 279a, RIC IV 398, BMCRE V 373, SRCV II 6305 var (LIBERA AVG), gVF, porous, weight 3.554 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 0o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse LIBER AVG, Liberalitas standing left, polos on head, counting board in right, cornucopia in left; scarce; $125.00 (€93.75)

Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Liberality is personified by the image of a woman, holding in one hand a counting board, or square tablet with a handle on which are cut a certain number of holes. These boards were used to quickly count the proper number of coins or other items for distribution to each person. It appears they were held over a container, covered with coins and the excess swept away back into the container. The proper number of coins would fill the holes and then would be dumped out to the recipient. On coins this symbol indicated the prince had given to the people money, grain, or other articles of consumption. In the other hand she holds a cornucopia, to indicate the abundance of wheat contained in the public graineries.
RS68507. Silver denarius, RIC IV 100, RSC III 81a, BMCRE V 214, SRCV 7521 var (cornucopia on base), VF+, centered, toned, weight 2.973 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 219 A.D.; obverse IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse LIBERALITAS AVG II, Liberalitas standing left, counting board in right, cornucopia in left; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren with Antioch Associates tag; $120.00 (€90.00)

Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Julia Domna was born in Emesa in 170 A.D. She was the youngest daughter of high-priest Julius Bassianus, a descendant of the Royal House of Emesa. Emesa was famous for its Temple of the Sun, the center of worship for the ancient pagan cult El-Gebal (or Elagabal). El-Gebal, worshipped in the form of a conical black stone, was the Aramaic name for the Syrian Sun God and means God of the Mountain. Emesa was also the birthplace of three other Roman empresses, Julia Maesa, Julia Mamaea and Julia Soaemias, and one emperor, Julia Domna's nephew, Elagabalus.
RS49580. Silver denarius, RIC IV 627 var (reverse legend), SRCV II 6591 var (same), F, weight 2.695 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 0o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 - 195 A.D.; obverse IVLIA DOMNA AVG, draped bust right; reverse LIBER AVG, Liberalitas standing left, counting board in right, cornucopia in left; very rare; $85.00 (€63.75)

Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.
Click for a larger photo This type has the earliest depiction of the Three Monetae on coinage.
RB63622. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 500, Fair, weight 19.208 g, maximum diameter 30.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 187 A.D.; obverse M COMMODVS ANT P FELIX AVG BRIT, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P XII IMP VIII COS V P P/ MON AVG/ S C, Three Monetae standing left, each holding scale in right and cornucopia in left; $80.00 (€60.00)

Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Three Monetae are depicted, one for each metal: gold, silver and copper.
RB65851. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 670, SRCV II 6404, Fine/Fair, flan crack, weight 19.409 g, maximum diameter 30.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 194 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP III, laureate head right; reverse MONET AVG COS II P P S C, three Monetae standing facing, each with head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; scarce; $55.00 (€41.25)

Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.
Click for a larger photo In 93 A.D., Pliny the Younger was named a praetor. On 24 August 79, he along with his uncle, Pliny the Elder, witnessed the eruption of Vesuvius, during which his uncle died. Pliny rose through the cursus honorum, a series of Imperial civil and military offices, and was an imperial magistrate under Trajan. He wrote hundreds of letters, many of which still survive, that are of great historical value for the time period. Some are addressed to reigning emperors or to notables such as the historian Tacitus. His letters to Trajan provide one of the few surviving records of the relationship between the imperial office and provincial governors.
RB71786. Copper as, RIC II, part 1, 756; Cohen 333; BMCRE II 469; BnF III 500, F, green patina, weight 8.328 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 92 - 94 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XVI CENS PER P P, laureate head right; reverse MONETA AVGVSTI, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left, S - C flanking across field; $55.00 (€41.25)

Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D.
Click for a larger photo A scarce denomination for the period.
RB90373. Bronze as, RIC 120a, Cohen 71, aF, rough, corrosion, weight 7.785 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse LIBERALITAS AVG, Liberalitas standing left, counting board in right, cornucopia in left, S - C flanking across field; scarce; $50.00 (€37.50)

Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Festivities celebrating Postumus' quinquennalia continued into 266 A.D. and very little troubled his empire in 267. A sudden deterioration in the coinage in 268 shows, however, that Postumus faced increasing challenges and the need to buy off an increasingly discontented army.
BB70780. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 199, RIC V 75, VF, weak reverse, weight 3.077 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 266 - 267; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; $36.00 (€27.00)

Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Liberality is personified by the image of a woman, holding in one hand a counting board, or square tablet with a handle on which are cut a certain number of holes. These boards were used to quickly count the proper number of coins or other items for distribution to each person. It appears they were held over a container, covered with coins and the excess swept away back into the container. The proper number of coins would fill the holes and then would be dumped out to the recipient. On coins this symbol indicated the prince had given to the people money, grain, or other articles of consumption. In the other hand she holds a cornucopia, to indicate the abundance of wheat contained in the public graineries.
RS72688. Silver antoninianus, cf. SRCV III 8619 (AVG II) or SRCV III 8621 (AVG III), Fair, broken, about 1/3 missing, weight 1.541 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 240 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse LIBERALITAS AVG II (or III), Liberalitas standing front, head left, counting board in right, cornucopia in left; $10.00 (€7.50)



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Catalog current as of Monday, December 22, 2014.
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