Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Personifications ▸ MoneyView Options:  |  |  |   

Money (Moneta)

Coins about...money! One of our favorite collecting themes. Roman propaganda often recorded largesses (represented by Liberalitas) on coins. She is usually depicted holding what was traditionally described as an abacus, a counting board. The object is also described as a tessera, type of banner, showing a number of painted marks equal to the number of aurei or denarii offered. Curtis Clay suggested it is actually a money shovel, a wooden shovel with shallow round depressions which could extract the exact number of coins needed from a chest. Another popular type is that of Moneta holding scales. One quite interesting coin is the Republic denarius of T.Carisius depicting mint tools: an anvil, tongs, a hammer and a die.


Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D., Overstrike on Denarius, Probably Severus Alexander

Click for a larger photo
Overstruck over a denarius of Severus Alexander, which suggests that the new coin was worth at least as much of the old one. Otherwise, it would have made more sense to melt the denarius.
RS73221. Silver antoninianus, cf. RIC V, part 2, 287 (S); Webb Carausius 336; SRCV IV 13629, VF, toned, weight 2.664 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 225o, Camulodunum (Colchester, England) mint, Mid 286 - Spring/Early Summer 293 A.D.; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left, mintmark obscured by over-strike effects; undertype bust (Severus Alexander?) visible; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection, ex Forum (2010); scarce; $180.00 (158.40)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 93 A.D., Pliny the Younger was named a praetor. On 24 August 79, he along with his uncle, Pliny the Elder, witnessed the eruption of Vesuvius, during which his uncle died. Pliny rose through the cursus honorum, a series of Imperial civil and military offices, and was an imperial magistrate under Trajan. He wrote hundreds of letters, many of which still survive, that are of great historical value for the time period. Some are addressed to reigning emperors or to notables such as the historian Tacitus. His letters to Trajan provide one of the few surviving records of the relationship between the imperial office and provincial governors.
RB73715. Copper as, RIC II, part 1, 756; BMCRE II 469; BnF III 500; Cohen I 333; Hunter I -; cf. SRCV 2807 (COS XV), VF, centered, green patina, light scratches and corrosion, weight 10.417 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 92 - 94 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XVI CENS PER P P, laureate head right; reverse MONETA AVGVSTI, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left, S - C flanking across field; $135.00 (118.80)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Liberality is personified by the image of a woman, holding in one hand a counting board, or square tablet with a handle on which are cut a certain number of holes. These boards were used to quickly count the proper number of coins or other items for distribution to each person. It appears they were held over a container, covered with coins and the excess swept away back into the container. The proper number of coins would fill the holes and then would be dumped out to the recipient. On coins this symbol indicated the prince had given to the people money, grain, or other articles of consumption. In the other hand she holds a cornucopia, to indicate the abundance of wheat contained in the public graineries.
RS68507. Silver denarius, RIC IV 100, RSC III 81a, BMCRE V 214, SRCV 7521 var (cornucopia on base), VF+, centered, toned, weight 2.973 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 219 A.D.; obverse IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse LIBERALITAS AVG II, Liberalitas standing left, counting board in right, cornucopia in left; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren with Antioch Associates tag; $120.00 (105.60)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Emesa was famous for its Temple of the Sun, the center of worship for the ancient pagan cult El-Gebal (or Elagabal). El-Gebal, worshipped in the form of a conical black stone, was the Aramaic name for the Syrian Sun God and means God of the Mountain. Julia Domna was born in Emesa in 170 A.D. She was the youngest daughter of high-priest Julius Bassianus, a descendant of the Royal House of Emesa.
RS65354. Silver denarius, RSC III 279a, RIC IV 398, BMCRE V 373, SRCV II 6305 var (LIBERA AVG), gVF, porous, weight 3.554 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 0o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse LIBER AVG, Liberalitas standing left, polos on head, counting board in right, cornucopia in left; scarce; $110.00 (96.80)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Regina, Juno Sospita and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Moneta, holding the scales symbolic of equity and a cornucopia indicating plenty. This surname given to Juno because she counseled the Romans to undertake none but just wars in which case she promised that they would never be in want of money. The first mint in Rome was within the temple of Juno Moneta.
RB73730. Copper as, RIC II, part 1, 303; BMCRE II 314; BnF III 337; Hunter I 112; Cohen I 325 var. (AVGVST); cf. SRCV I 2806 (COS XV), aVF, dark sea green patina, light marks and scratches, porosity, areas of corrosion, weight 9.898 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 85 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI, laureate bust right with aegis; reverse MONETA AVGVSTI, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C across field below center; $110.00 (96.80)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Liberalitas coin types attest to occasions when the emperor has displayed his generosity towards the people by a distribution to them, in money, provisions, or both. The first mention of Liberalitas was on coins of Hadrian. It was a type frequently repeated by the succeeding emperors. Indeed these instances of imperial generosity are more carefully recorded on coins than they are by history. This coin advertises that Caracalla has made his eighth distribution to the people. Liberality is personified by the image of a woman, holding in one hand a counting board, or square tablet with a handle on which are cut a certain number of holes. These boards were used to quickly count the proper number of coins or other items for distribution to each person. In the other hand she holds a cornucopia
RS72357. Silver denarius, RIC IV 219; RSC III 134; BMCRE V p. 371, 79; Hunter III -; SRCV II -, Choice VF, excellent portrait, centered, slight porosity, weight 3.439 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 213 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG BRIT, man's bearded and laureate head right; reverse LIBERALITAS AVG VIII, Liberalitas standing left, coin counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left; ex a-a-c-ancientcoins (eBay); $90.00 (79.20)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 213, Caracalla summoned Abgar IX Severus, the king of Edessa, to Rome and had him murdered. A year later the Kingdom of Edessa was incorporated into the empire as a Roman province.
RS72358. Silver denarius, RIC IV 236; RSC III 166; BMCRE V p. 441, 62; cf. SRCV II 6821 (obv legend); Hunter III 15 (same), Choice VF, excellent centering, light toning, die break behind Caracalla's eye, weight 3.094 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, late 213 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate bearded head right; reverse MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; ex Timeline Auctions; $90.00 (79.20)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Liberality is personified by the image of a woman, holding in one hand a counting board, or square tablet with a handle on which are cut a certain number of holes. These boards were used to quickly count the proper number of coins or other items for distribution to each person. It appears they were held over a container, covered with coins and the excess swept away back into the container. The proper number of coins would fill the holes and then would be dumped out to the recipient. On coins this symbol indicated the prince had given to the people money, grain, or other articles of consumption. In the other hand she holds a cornucopia, to indicate the abundance of wheat contained in the public graineries.
RS73368. Silver denarius, RIC IV 278a, RSC III 298, BMCRE V 349, SRCV II 6306, VF, superb portrait, excellent centering and strike, flan cracks as expected for this issue, small flaw on reverse at 12:30, weight 2.786 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 209 A.D.; obverse SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse LIBERALITAS AVG VI, Liberalitas standing left, counting board in right, cornucopia in left; $90.00 (79.20)


Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Moneta was a surname given to Juno because she was said to have promised the Romans that if they fought only just wars, they would never be in want of money.
RA76754. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 199a, Cunetio 2413 (968 spec.), RIC V 75, Schulzki AGK 45, Mairat 65, Elmer 336, Hunter IV 60, VF, well centered and struck, nice portrait, weight 3.694 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 45o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, c. 263 - 265 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; ex Harlan J. Berk; $90.00 (79.20)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This type has the earliest depiction of the Three Monetae on coinage.
RB63622. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 500, Fair, weight 19.208 g, maximum diameter 30.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 187 A.D.; obverse M COMMODVS ANT P FELIX AVG BRIT, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P XII IMP VIII COS V P P/ MON AVG/ S C, Three Monetae standing left, each holding scale in right and cornucopia in left; $70.00 (61.60)




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Wednesday, February 10, 2016.
Page created in 1.404 seconds
Money