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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ North Africa ▸ Other North AfricaView Options:  |  |  | 

Other North Africa

Tamouda, Mauretania, North Africa, 1st Century B.C.

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Tamuda (Tamusia) was founded by Berbers in the 3rd century B.C. There was likely a Phoenician presence in the next century, mainly for commerce. Rome occupied Tamuda during the reign of Augustus. Around 42 A.D., it was leveled by Roman garrisons during an insurrection. It was replaced with a fortified settlement, later a Roman castrum, and grew to be a major city of Mauretania Tingitana. Industry included fish salting and purple dye production. The region became fully Romanized, Christian and "pacified." By the time the Vandals arrived in the fifth century the city had disappeared from history and may have already been abandoned.
GB84555. Bronze AE 16, Mazard 585, SNG Cop 718, Müller Afrique 242, SRCV II 6653, aVF, well centered, corrosion, weight 2.221 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 45o, Tamouda (near Tetouan, Morocco) mint, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.; obverse bearded head right, neo-Punic inscription behind head: TMDT (or similar); reverse two heads of grain, meander symbol and pellet between them; rare; $180.00 (€160.20)
 


Lix, Mauretania, North Africa, c. 50 - 1 B.C.

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Ancient Lixus is located within modern Larache, on the right bank of Loukkos River the about three kilometers inland from the Atlantic ocean. Lixus was first settled by the Phoenicians in the 7th century B.C. and was later annexed by Carthage. When Carthage fell to Rome, Lixus became an imperial outpost of the Roman province Mauretania Tingitana. Among the ruins, there are Roman baths, temples, 4th-century walls, a mosaic floor, a Christian church and the intricate remains of the Capitol Hill.
GB84540. Bronze AE 26, Alexandropoulos MAA 167, Mazard 630, Müller Afrique 234, SNG Cop 692, SGCV II 6643, aF, light corrosion, weight 9.762 g, maximum diameter 26.2 mm, die axis 180o, Lixus (Larache, Morocco) mint, c. 50 - 1 B.C.; obverse male head left (Chusor-Phtah?), with conical hat with long tassel; reverse two bunches of grapes, neo-Punic inscription: LKS (above), MPL (below); rare; $160.00 (€142.40)
 


Tamouda, Mauretania, North Africa, 1st Century B.C.

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Tamuda (Tamusia) was founded by Berbers in the 3rd century B.C. There was likely a Phoenician presence in the next century, mainly for commerce. Rome occupied Tamuda during the reign of Augustus. Around 42 A.D., it was leveled by Roman garrisons during an insurrection. It was replaced with a fortified settlement, later a Roman castrum, and grew to be a major city of Mauretania Tingitana. Industry included fish salting and purple dye production. The region became fully Romanized, Christian and "pacified." By the time the Vandals arrived in the fifth century the city had disappeared from history and may have already been abandoned.
GB84542. Bronze AE 16, cf. Mazard 587 (anepigraphic), SNG Cop 719 (same), Müller Afrique 242 (neo-Punic TMDT behind head), SRCV II 6653 (same), F/VF, rough, dark green patina, weight 2.454 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 0o, Tamouda (near Tetouan, Morocco) mint, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.; obverse bearded head right; reverse two heads of grain, meander symbol and pellet between them; ex-RBW Collection; rare; $160.00 (€142.40)
 


Lix, Mauretania, North Africa, c. 50 - 1 B.C.

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Ancient Lixus is located within modern Larache, on the right bank of Loukkos River the about three km inland from the Atlantic ocean. Lixus was first settled by the Phoenicians in the 7th century B.C. and was later annexed by Carthage. When Carthage fell to Rome, Lixus became an imperial outpost of the Roman province Mauretania Tingitana. Among the ruins, there are Roman baths, temples, 4th-century walls, a mosaic floor, a Christian church and the intricate remains of the Capitol Hill.
GB84541. Bronze AE 18, Alexandropoulos MAA 168, Mazard 633, SNG Cop 694, SGCV II 6643, Fair, rough, scratches, weight 5.653 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Lixus (Larache, Morocco) mint, c. 50 - 1 B.C.; obverse head of Chusor-Phtah right, wearing pointed cap with long tassel; reverse bunch of grapes, neo-Punic inscription: MPM - LKS divided across field; ex-RBW collection; rare; $100.00 (€89.00)
 


Iol-Caesarea, Mauretania, Late 3rd - 2nd Century B.C.

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Phoenicians from Carthage founded Iol as a trading station around 400 B.C. It became a part of the kingdom of Numidia under Jugurtha, c. 160 - 104 B.C. In 29 B.C., Roman emperor Augustus made the Numidian King Juba II and his wife Cleopatra Selene II (daughter of Marc Antony and Cleopatra of Egypt) king and queen of Mauretania. The capital was established at Iol, which was renamed Caesarea in honor of the emperor.
GB84547. Bronze 1/4 Unit, SNG Cop 681, Alexandropoulos MAA 146, Mazard 549, Müller Afrique 288, F, tight flan, flan crack, corrosion, marks, weight 2.638 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 90o, Iol-Caesarea (Cherchell, Algeria) mint, late 3rd - 2nd century B.C.; obverse head of Isis left, Punic letters ayin over tet behind; reverse obscure counterclockwise Punic inscription, three grain ears; $100.00 (€89.00)
 


Kingdom of Numidia, North Africa, Micipsa, c. 148 - 118 B.C.

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Numidia (202 - 46 B.C.) was an Ancient Berber kingdom in what is now Algeria and a smaller part of Tunisia, in North Africa. It was bordered by the kingdoms of Mauretania (modern-day Morocco) to the west, the Roman province of Africa (modern-day Tunisia) to the east, the Mediterranean Sea to the north, and the Sahara Desert to the south. After the death of the long-lived Masinissa c. 148 B.C., he was succeeded by his son Micipsa. When Micipsa died in 118, he was succeeded by his two sons Hiempsal I and Adherbal, and by his illegitimate grandson, Jugurtha. Jugurtha had Hiempsal killed, which led to war with Adherbal. Rome declared war after Jugurtha killed some Roman businessmen aiding Adherbal. Jugurtha surrendered and received a highly favorable peace treaty, which raised suspicions of bribery. The Roman commander was summoned to Rome to face corruption charges. Jugurtha was also forced to come to Rome to testify, where he was completely discredited. War broke out again and several legions were dispatched to North Africa. The war dragged out into a seemingly endless campaign. Frustrated at the apparent lack of action, Gaius Marius returned to Rome to seek election as Consul. Marius was elected, and then returned to take control of the war. He sent his Quaestor Lucius Cornelius Sulla to neighboring Mauretania to eliminate their support for Jugurtha. With the help of Bocchus I of Mauretania, Sulla captured Jugurtha. In 104 B.C., after being paraded through the streets of Rome in Marius' Triumph, Jugurtha was executed.
GB77302. Bronze AE 27, Alexandropoulos MAA 18a, Mazard III 50, Müller Afrique 32, SNG Cop 505 ff., SGCV II 6597, F, near black dark glossy patina, earthen deposits, weight 14.970 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 0o, Numidian mint, c. 148 - 118 B.C.; obverse laureate head of king left, pointed beard, dot border; reverse horse galloping left, pellet below, linear border; $90.00 (€80.10)
 







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REFERENCES

Alexandropoulos, J. Les monnaies de l'Afrique antique: 400 av. J.-C. - 40 ap. J.-C. (Toulouse, 2000).
Anzani, A. Numismatica Axumita. RIN III, Series 3, XXXIX (IV). (Milan, 1926).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Babelon, J. Catalogue de la collection de Luynes: monnaies greques. (Paris, 1924-1936).
Strauss, P. Collection Maurice Laffaille - monnaies grecques en bronze. (Bàle, 1990).
Mazard, J. Corpus Nummorum Numidiae Mauretaniaeque. (Paris, 1955-1958).
Müller, L. et. al. Numismatique de l’ancienne Afrique. (Copenhagen, 1860-1862).
Munro-Hay, S.C. Catalogue of the Aksumite Coins in the British Museum. (London, 1999).
Munro-Hay, S.C. "The al-Madhariba hoard of gold Aksumite and late Roman coins" in NC 149. (London, 1989).
Munro-Hay, S.C. & B. Juel-Jensen. Aksumite Coinage. (London, 1995).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2, Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 8: Egypt, North Africa, Spain - Gaul. (1994).

Catalog current as of Monday, March 27, 2017.
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Other North Africa