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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Aphrodite or Venus||View Options:  |  |  | 

Aphrodite or Venus

Goddess of love, beauty and sexuality. Daughter of Zeus and Dione or, in other traditions, of Uranus. Symbols include the dove.

The Sileraioi, Sicily, c. 357 - 330 B.C.

|Other| |Sicily|, |The| |Sileraioi,| |Sicily,| |c.| |357| |-| |330| |B.C.|,
Sileraioi was not a city. The Sileraians were Campanian mercenaries who took their name from their proximity to the river Silaros. These rare coins have been found at the site of their settlement, Cozzo Mususino, a natural strong-hold in north central Sicily. The coins are often overstruck on coins from Syracuse minted c. 375 - 345 B.C.
SH68704. Bronze Calciati p. 301, 2; HGC 2 1243 (R1); SNG Cop -; SNG ANS -; SNG Munchen -; SNG Morcom -, VF/F, reverse rough, weight 7.521 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 90o, Sileraian mint, c. 340 - 330 B.C.; obverse ΣI−ΛEPAIΩ−N (retrograde counterclockwise from 3:00), man-faced bull forepart charging right; reverse SIL (retrograde, upward behind), warrior advancing right, spear in right hand, shield in left; rare; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00


Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus

|Lucilla|, |Lucilla,| |Augusta| |c.| |164| |-| |182| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Lucius| |Verus|, |as|
The story of Commodus and Lucilla in the movie Gladiator was not historically accurate but the characters were based, in part, on the real emperor and his sister. Lucilla did plot to assassinate her brother Commodus and the plot did fail. Commodus actually did fight as a gladiator. But Maximus, entirely fictional, was not there to save Lucilla. Commodus won every time. Lucilla was banished to Capri and executed a year later.
RB92462. Bronze as, RIC III 1766, Cohen III 75, BMCRE IV 1224, Hunter II 60, SRCV II 5524 var. (obv. leg.), VF, well centered, olive patina, legends weak, edge flaking, weight 10.336 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 210o, Rome mint, 164 - 166 A.D.; obverse LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waived and knotted in chignon low at back; reverse VENVS, Venus standing left, apple in extended right hand, long grounded scepter in left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field below center; from the Errett Bishop Collection, ex B. A. Seaby Numismatists (69, Great Portland Street, London, W.1.); scarce; $135.00 SALE |PRICE| $122.00


Galeria Valeria, Augusta, June 293(?) - 311 A.D., Second Wife of Galerius

|Galeria| |Valeria|, |Galeria| |Valeria,| |Augusta,| |June| |293(?)| |-| |311| |A.D.,| |Second| |Wife| |of| |Galerius|, |follis|
Venus (Aphrodite) can be faulted for the Trojan War. Upset that she was not invited to a wedding, she went anyway and maliciously left a golden apple inscribed "For the fairest" on the banquet table. The goddesses, as Aphrodite expected, argued who was the rightful possessor of this prize. It was determined the most handsome mortal in the world, a noble Trojan youth named Paris, would decide. Each of the three finalists offered Paris a bribe. Hera promised he would rule the world. Athena said she would make him victorious in battle. Aphrodite guaranteed the love of the most beautiful woman in the world. This was Helen, who was married to the king of Sparta. Paris awarded the golden apple to Aphrodite. Aphrodite enabled Paris to elope with Helen, Helen of Troy. Helen's husband raised a Greek army to retrieve his wife, starting the Trojan War.
RT91453. Billon follis, Hunter V 9 (also 2nd officina), RIC VI Heraclea 43, SRCV IV 14593, Cohen VII 10, VF, well centered, dark brown tone, weight 4.755 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, c. 309 - 310 A.D.; obverse GAL VALERIA AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane; reverse VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing facing, head left, raising apple in right hand, raising drapery over shoulder with left hand, HTB in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection, ex Pegasi Coins; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00


Laodicea ad Lycus, Phrygia, c. 200 - 133 B.C.

|Laodicea| |ad| |Lycus|, |Laodicea| |ad| |Lycus,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |200| |-| |133| |B.C.|, |AE| |16|
Laodicea on the Lycus was on the river Lycus (Curuksu), in Lydia, later the Roman Province of Phrygia Pacatiana, now near the modern city of Denizli, Turkey. It was home to one of the Seven churches of Asia in the Book of Revelation. In 2013 the archaeological site was identified as a of World Heritage Site. Its ruins attest to its former greatness. Its many buildings include a stadium, baths, temples, a gymnasium, theaters, and a bouleuterion (Senate House). On the eastern side, the line of the ancient wall may be distinctly traced, with the remains of the Ephesus gate; there are streets traversing the town, flanked by colonnades and numerous pedestals. North of the town, towards the Lycus, are many sarcophagi, with their covers lying near them, partly embedded in the ground, and all having been long since rifled. Laodicea
GB91507. Bronze AE 16, BMC Phrygia p. 284, 29; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; Lindgren -, aVF, dark patina rubbed to bare bronze on highest points, reverse slightly off center, weight 3.437 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Lycum (near Denizli, Turkey) mint, c. 200 - 133 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Aphrodite right, wearing stephane, hair in a bun at the back; reverse Aphrodite standing slightly left, head left, draped in long chiton dove in extended right hand, rose on stem in lower left field, ΛAO∆IKEΩN downward on right; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; scarce; $95.00 SALE |PRICE| $85.50


Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus

|Lucilla|, |Lucilla,| |Augusta| |c.| |164| |-| |182| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Lucius| |Verus|, |denarius|
Venus (Aphrodite) can be faulted for the Trojan War. Upset that she was not invited to a wedding, she went anyway and maliciously left a golden apple inscribed "For the fairest" on the banquet table. The goddesses, as Aphrodite expected, argued who was the rightful possessor of this prize. It was determined the most handsome mortal in the world, a noble Trojan youth named Paris, would decide. Each of the three finalists offered Paris a bribe. Hera promised he would rule the world. Athena said she would make him victorious in battle. Aphrodite guaranteed the love of the most beautiful woman in the world. This was Helen, who was married to the king of Sparta. Paris awarded the golden apple to Aphrodite. Aphrodite enabled Paris to elope with Helen, Helen of Troy. Helen's husband raised a Greek army to retrieve his wife, starting the Trojan War.
RS92464. Silver denarius, RIC III 784, BMCRE IV 322, RSC II 70, SRCV II 5491, Cohen 70, VF, toned, flow lines, mild die wear, slightly off center on a broad flan, edge cracks, weight 2.860 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 164 - 166 A.D.; obverse LVCILLA AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right, hair waived and knotted in chignon low at back; reverse VENVS, Venus standing left, apple in right, long scepter in left; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $95.00 SALE |PRICE| $85.50


Paphos, Cyprus, Timocharis or Nicolcles, c. 350 - 320 B.C.

|Cyprus|, |Paphos,| |Cyprus,| |Timocharis| |or| |Nicolcles,| |c.| |350| |-| |320| |B.C.|, |AE| |14|
Destrooper-Georgiades speculates, that the type of the rose may mark a change of reign in the royal house of Paphos or a monetary reform. She also notes, they are often corroded and their study presents many difficulties of classification and dating because, like most bronzes struck in Cyprus at that time they are anepigraphic or bear only one syllabic character whose meaning is not always obvious and because none was found in a dated stratigraphic layer, not even the 12 or so found in the systematic excavations of Kourion and of Paphos.
GB88980. Bronze AE 14, cf. Zapiti-Michaelidou 22; Destrooper-Georgiades Nouvelles 13; Tzambazis 92; BMC Cyprus p. 45; 49, gF, crowded flan, corrosion, weight 2.193 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 180o, Paphos mint, c. 350 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of Aphrodite left, wearing ornamented stephanos; reverse rose, tendril left; very rare; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Wife of Hadrian

|Sabina|, |Sabina,| |Augusta| |128| |-| |c.| |136| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Hadrian|, |sestertius|
Venus (Aphrodite) can be faulted for the Trojan War. Upset that she was not invited to a wedding, she went anyway and maliciously left a golden apple inscribed "For the fairest" on the banquet table. The goddesses, as Aphrodite expected, argued who was the rightful possessor of this prize. It was determined the most handsome mortal in the world, a noble Trojan youth named Paris, would decide. Each of the three finalists offered Paris a bribe. Hera promised he would rule the world. Athena said she would make him victorious in battle. Aphrodite guaranteed the love of the most beautiful woman in the world. This was Helen, who was married to the king of Sparta. Paris awarded the golden apple to Aphrodite. Aphrodite enabled Paris to elope with Helen, Helen of Troy. Helen's husband raised a Greek army to retrieve his wife, starting the Trojan War.
RB92432. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II-3 2596 (S), BMCRE Hadrian III 1883, Hunter II 34, Strack II 810, SRCV II 3941, Cohen II 74, F, a little rough from corrosion, uneven strike and slightly off center with half of each legend weak/off flan, weight 21.370 g, maximum diameter 31.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 137 - early 138 B.C.; obverse SABINA AVGVSTA HADRAINI AVG P P, draped bust right, hair in long plait falling down back of neck and roll above stephane in front; reverse VENERI GENETRICI (to Mother Venus), Venus standing facing, head right, raising cloak from shoulder with her right hand, apple in left hand, S C (senatus consulto) across field slightly below center; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy I Soter, 305 - 282 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Ptolemaic| |Kingdom| |of| |Egypt,| |Ptolemy| |I| |Soter,| |305| |-| |282| |B.C.|, |hemiobol|
In Coins of the Ptolemaic Empire, C. Lorber writes, "This series combines a type of local significance -- Aphrodite, patroness of Cyprus -- with Ptolemy's personal badge, the eagle on thunderbolt, and names Ptolemy as issuing authority." Of the likely mint, Lorber writes, "The pattern of finds for this issue is consistent with an origin at Palai Paphos, home to the great sanctuary of Aphrodite Cypria."
GP85879. Bronze hemiobol, Lorber CPE B120; Svoronos 81 (2 spec.); BMC Ptolemies p. 7, 60; SNG Milan 28; SNG Cop 643; Weiser 3; Noeske -; Malter -, F, tight flan, rough corrosion, weight 3.046 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Cyprus, Palai Paphos(?) mint, 294 - 282 B.C.; obverse head of Aphrodite Paphia right, wearing plain taenia; reverse eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, head left, ΠTOΛE (upward on left); rare; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00







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