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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Justice & Equity||View Options:  |  |  | 

Justice: Equity (Dikaiosyne or Aequitas) and Punishment (Nemisis)

In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also a personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). She is depicted with a cornucopia and a balance suggesting Aequitas Augusti is a source of prosperity. Dikaiosyne is the Greek equivalent personification of justice and fair dealing.

Nemesis, the balancer of life, is the goddess of revenge, the avenger of crimes and punisher of wicked doers. She distributes fortune, good or bad, in due proportion to each according to what is deserved. She often holds a lorum, a long scarf worn by Roman magistrates, to symbolize her authority as judge, and scales or a cubit rule to measure each man's just deserts. The wheel of fate rests against her side.

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

|Philip| |I|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
RIC and RSC list this type with the reverse legend ending AVGG and note that Cohen describes it as ending AVG in error. Cohen does list this reverse from Antioch, but with a bust left. While the AVG ending is rare, we do know of other examples.
RS92350. Silver antoninianus, SRCV III 8917, Tulln Hoard 894, vri 7A, Bland 16 (29 spec.), Cohen V 9, RIC IV 82 var. (bust l.); RSC IV 8 var. (same), Hunter III -, EF, excellent portrait, some mint luster, well centered, uneven strike resulting in parts of legends weak, flow lines, tiny edge cracks, weight 4.569 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, mid - end 247 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse AEQVITAS AVG (equity of the emperor), Aequitas standing half left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; rare; $160.00 SALE |PRICE| $144.00


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

|Gordian| |III|, |Gordian| |III,| |29| |July| |238| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
This type was struck both at Rome and at Antioch. One way to distinguish Gordian's Antioch mint coins from Rome mint coins is by letter shape, in particular, the letter M; on Antioch coins M is formed with a V in the middle, thus IVI, whereas the Rome mint M resembles two lambdas, thus ΛΛ.
MA95646. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 34, RSC IV 17, Hunter III 14, SRCV III 8600, VF, excellent toned, flow lines, light marks and scratches, reverse a little off center, weight 3.715 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 1 Jan 240 - c. Mar 240 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse AEQVITAS AVG (equity of the emperor), Aequitas standing half left, head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $35.02 (32.22)


Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.

|Claudius| |II|, |Claudius| |II| |Gothicus,| |September| |268| |-| |August| |or| |September| |270| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also the personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). The scales, a natural emblem of equity, express righteousness. The cornucopia signifies the prosperity which results from Aequitas and Aequitas Augusti.
MA95641. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC T1030, Huvelin 1990 15, Venra 9912, RIC V-1 197, Cohen VI 6, SRCV III 11316, Hunter IV -, Normanby -, Cunetio -, VF/F, flow lines, light marks, slight porosity, weight 4.504 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 180o, 8th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, issue 1, c. end 268 - end 269; obverse IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse AEQVITAS AVG (equity of the emperor), Aequitas standing front, head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, H in exergue; $20.49 (18.85)







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REFERENCES

Posnansky, H. Nemesis und Adrasteia. (Koebner, 1890).
Catalog current as of Tuesday, July 14, 2020.
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