Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Adoptive Emperors ▸ HadrianView Options:  |  |  |   

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Hadrian, one of the "Five Good Emperors," abandoned the expansionist policy of Trajan and established a policy of defense and consolidation during which Hadrian's Wall in Britain was constructed. He traveled to nearly every province of the Empire, more than any other emperor, often ordering grandiose building programs to improve infrastructure and the quality of life in those regions. An ardent admirer of Greece, he sought to make Athens the cultural capital of the Empire and ordered the construction of many opulent temples in the city. He spent much of his time with the military; usually wore military attire and even dined and slept amongst the soldiers. He ordered military training and drilling to be more rigorous and made use of false reports of attack to keep the army alert. He suppressed the Bar Kokhba revolt in Judaea, renaming the province Syria Palaestina.Roman Empire 125 AD

Ainos, Thrace, c. 117 - 138 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This extremely rare type is unpublished in references and missing from major collections. The only other example we know is the referenced example sold in Nomos obolos 7. Nomos dated the type c. 280 - 200 B.C. AMNG and RPC Online IV list a similar type with both Hermes and the goat right. RPC dates that type to the 2nd Century A.D. We believe the Hermes portrait is Augusticized and has some resemblance to Hadrian. We tentatively date the type to Hadrian's reign, c. 117 - 138 A.D.
GB86124. Bronze AE 18, Nomos obolos 7 (9 Jul 2017), lot 28 (same dies); cf. AMNG 403, pl. V.26 (rev.) (Hermes and goat right, etc.); RPC Online IV temp. 4495 (=AMNG 403), F/aF, well centered, bumps and marks, corrosion, porosity, centration dimple on reverse, weight 4.132 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Ainos (Enez, Turkey) mint, c. 117 - 138 A.D.; obverse head of Hermes left, caduceus before, no centration dimple; reverse AI-NIΩN, goat standing left, centration dimple; unpublished in references, missing from major collections, extremely rare - 2nd known specimen; $200.00 (€170.00)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Most references list this type as a quadrans but examples without a thick patina, including this coin, appear to be orichalcum (brass) vice copper. Yellow brass indicates the type is a semis.
RB85750. Orichalcum semis, RIC II 625 (S), BMCRE III 1279, Cohen II 1167 (5 fr.), SRCV II 3704, Strack II 579, Hunter II 380 var. (standing left, head right), VF, Tiber patina, tight flan, corrosion, weight 2.104 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 120 - 123 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, eagle standing half right, head turned left, wings open but not spread; reverse P M TR P COS III, horizontal winged thunderbolt, S C below; scarce; $150.00 (€127.50)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Neptune was the god of freshwater and the sea in Roman religion. He is the counterpart of the Greek god Poseidon. In the Greek-influenced tradition, Neptune was the brother of Jupiter and Pluto; the brothers presided over the realms of Heaven, the earthly world, and the Underworld. Salacia was his consort. Neptune was likely associated with fresh water springs before the sea. Like Poseidon, Neptune was worshiped by the Romans also as a god of horses, under the name Neptunus Equester, a patron of horse-racing.
RS85763. Silver denarius, RSC II 307, RIC II 155, Strack II 160, BMCRE III 348, Hunter II 134, SRCV II 3470 var. (Neptune left), VF, toned, tight flan, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.207 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 126 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, Neptune standing right, left foot on prow, nude but for cloak over thigh, grounded trident vertical in right hand, dolphin in left hand; $135.00 (€114.75)

Roman Egypt, Nov 130 - c. 138 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Both the obverse and reverse types on this tessera are published but the combination does not appear to be published. Nor did we find another example online. According to Milne, lead tesserae served as local small change in Egypt during the first to the third century A.D.
RX74430. Lead tessera, Unpublished; cf. Dattari 6444 and Geissen 3584 (for obverse type), F, weight 3.300 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 180o, Alexandria(?) mint, Nov 130 - c. 138 A.D. (possibly later); obverse Antinous on horseback right, wearing hem hem crown, caduceus in right hand; reverse bust of Serapis(?) right, kalathos (?, on head), cornucopia on shoulder behind, snake entwined staff before; extremely rare; $125.00 (€106.25)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The Romans used poppy for cooking and medicinal purposes. For cooking, it was used mainly as a garnish or sprinkled on bread, perhaps also in desserts. Pliny sites the medicinal purpose: "...allow the poppy sap to thicken, roll it into pastilles and allow these to dry in the shade. It is a tranquilizer, but if you take too much, you will die in your sleep." (N.H. XX-lxxvi)
RS85761. Silver denarius, RSC II 172, RIC II 230a, BMCRE III 595, Hunter II 201, Strack II 227, SRCV II 3461 var. (laureate), VF, well centered, uneven toning, light corrosion, edge cracks, weight 2.514 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right; reverse ANNONA AVG, modius with four stalks of grain and one poppy in center; $120.00 (€102.00)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good luck and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS85762. Silver denarius, RSC II 615, BMCRE III 608, RIC II 234, Strack II 231, Hunter II -, SRCV I -, VF/F, well centered, nice portrait, light toning corrosion/porosity, tight flan, edge cracks, reverse die wear, weight 3.023 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse FELICITAS AVG (the good fortune of the Emperor), Felicitas (happiness) standing half left, caduceus (symbol of peace) in right hand, olive branch (symbol of peace) in left hand; $110.00 (€93.50)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Cyrenaica and Crete(?)

Click for a larger photo
This type was certainly struck in the east. RPC Online III assigns it to the province of Cyrenaica and Crete; Mantis ANS to Caesarea in Cappadocia; Bostra is also a possibility.
RP85807. Bronze semis, RPC Online III 11, Mantis ANS 1944.100.62449, Sydenham Caesarea 288, Asolati 179 (Cyrene), RIC II p. 428 note, BMCRE III p. 440 note, VF, slightly rough, scratches, encrustations, edge cracks, weight 2.813 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain eastern (Caesarea?) mint, 11 Aug 117 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse COS III, bearded and horned head of Zeus Ammon right; scarce; $110.00 (€93.50)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Apamea, Phrygia

Click for a larger photo
While playing the flute Athena saw her reflection in the water and disturbed by how her cheeks looked, puffed up while playing, threw away the instrument in disgust. The satyr Marsyas picked up the flute and since it had once been inspired by the breath of a goddess, it played beautifully on its own accord. Elated by his success, Marsyas challenged Apollo to a musical contest. For the prize, the victor could do what he pleased with the vanquished. The Muses were the umpires. Apollo played the cithara and Marsyas the flute. Only after Apollo added his voice to the music of his lyre was the contest decided in his favor. As a just punishment for the presumption of Marsyas, Apollo bound him to a tree and flayed him alive. His blood was the source of the river Marsyas, and Apollo hung up his skin, like a wine bag, in the cave out of which that river flows.
RP87110. Bronze AE 19, SNG Cop 212 corr. (KAI CEB, same dies); BMC Phrygia p. 96, 155 & pl. XI, 10 (same rev. die); Weber 7036; RPC III 2586; SNGvA 3492; SNG Mün 155, gVF, tight flan, rough etched porous surfaces, weight 3.927 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Apameia (Dinar, Turkey) mint, obverse A∆PIANOC KAIC CEB, laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian right, with aegis; reverse AΠAMEΩN MAPCYAC KIBΩTOI, Marsyas, naked but for chlamys over lower limbs, reclining left in rocky cave, above which are two or five chests, holding cornucopia in his raised right hand, double flute in left hand; beneath him, inverted vase from which water flows; $110.00 (€93.50)

Click for a larger photo
Hadrian's galley reverse types refer to his return to Rome by sea from his travels to the provinces.
RB85872. Copper as, RIC II 673d (S), Hunter II 422, BMCRE III 1342, SRCV II 3682, Cohen II 446 var. (no drapery), VF/F, centered on a tight flan, corrosion, scrapes on reverse, weight 8.824 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, galley right with rowers; ram, acrostolium, and vexillum (or furled sail) at prow; rudder and arched cabin at stern; S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; scarce; $80.00 (€68.00)

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Nakrasa, Lydia

Click for a larger photo
The site of Nakrasa has been identified on a hill overseeing the Bakirchay Valley about two miles southeast of Kirkagach, Turkey. Nakrasa was a Seleukid stronghold garrisoned by a Macedonian guard. It was an important fortress for the Kingdom of Pergamon securing an important road. It appears the city first struck coinage under Domitian and its last coins were struck under Marcus Aurelius. The coins chiefly refer to the cults of Artemis Ephesia, Kybele, and Asklepios.
RP86885. Bronze AE 19, RPC III 1805 (9 spec.); BMC Lydia p. 167, 17 - 18; Winterthur 3838; Waddington 5116; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, F, encrustations, light corrosion, scratches, weight 3.854 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Nakrasa (near Kirkagach, Turkey) mint, obverse AYTO TPAIANOC A∆PIANOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse NAKPACITΩN, Tyche standing left, kalathos on head, grounded rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $30.00 (€25.50)






Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Blum, G. "Numismatique D'Antinoos" in JIAN 16. (Athens, 1914). pp. 33 - 70.
Calicó, E.X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 2: Nerva to Antoninus Pius. (Paris, 1883).
Hill, P.V. The Dating and Arrangement of the Undated Coins of Rome, A.D. 98-148. (London, 1970).
Mattingly H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II: Vespasian to Hadrian. (London, 1926).
Mattingly, H. & R.A.G. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 3: Nerva to Hadrian. (London, 1936).
McAlee, R. The Coins of Roman Antioch. (Lancaster, PA, 2007).
Robinson, A.S. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Seaby, H.A. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Strack, P.L. Untersuchungen zur römischen Reichsprägung des zweiten Jahrhunderts, Teil II: Die Reichsprägung zur Zeit des Hadrian. (Stuttgart, 1933).
Toynbee, J.M.C. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Friday, March 23, 2018.
Page created in 1.909 seconds.
Roman Coins of Hadrian