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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Quality| ▸ |Patina||View Options:  |  |  |   

Patina on ancient coins

In this section we include the most attractively patinated bronze coins of our selection, as well as uncleaned hoard and fine cabinet toned silver.

Herennius Etruscus, Early 251 - First Half of June 251 A.D.

|Herennius| |Etruscus|, |Herennius| |Etruscus,| |Early| |251| |-| |First| |Half| |of| |June| |251| |A.D.||sestertius|
The reverse legend dedicates this coin to the Prince of Youth, Herennius Etruscus. When Augustus ruled Rome, he was not called emperor or king, he was the Princeps, the "first of men." In the empire, the designated successors to the emperor were named caesar and also given the title Princeps Juventutis, the "first of youths." This is the origin of the English word prince, meaning the son of a monarch.
RB95775. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV Decius 171a (R), Cohen V 28, Banti 6, Hunter III 22, SRCV III 9534, aVF/F, excellent portrait, attractive mottled patina, porosity, rough areas, squared flan, reverse legend mostly obscure or off flan, weight 18.297 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 250 - early 251 A.D.; obverse Q HER ETR MES DECIVS NOB C, bare-headed, draped bust right, from behind; reverse PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS (to the Prince of Youth), Herennius standing left in military dress, rod downward in right, transverse spear in left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking low across field; rare; $250.00 (€230.00)
 


Maximinus II Daia, Late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D., Antioch, Syria, Civic Christian Persecution Issue

|Antioch|, |Maximinus| |II| |Daia,| |Late| |309| |-| |30| |April| |313| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Syria,| |Civic| |Christian| |Persecution| |Issue||quarter| |follis|
In 311, after the death of Galerius in late April or May, representatives from Nicomedia presented themselves before Maximinus, bringing images of their gods and requested that Christians not be allowed to live in their city. Late in 311, an embassy from Antioch, led by their curator Theotecnus, also requested permission to banish Christians from their city and its territory. Other cities followed with the same request. Maximinus support for Antioch's requests is advertised by this coin type. Fearing his co-emperors, however, Maximinus changed his mind. His edict in May 313 restored privileges and property to Christians. Later in 313, Licinius captured Antioch and executed Theotecnus.
RL93284. Billon quarter follis, McAlee 171(d), Van Heesch 2, Vagi 2955, SRCV IV 14932, gVF, dark patina, earthen highlighting deposits, weight 1.560 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 312 - May 313 A.D.; obverse IOVI CONSERVATORI (to Jupiter the Protector), Jupiter seated left, globe in right, long scepter vertical behind in left; reverse VICTORIA AVGG (victory of the two emperors), Victory left, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond in left, ∆ in right field, ANT in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $180.00 (€165.60)
 


Metapontion, Lucania, Italy, c. 350 - 275 B.C.

|Italy|, |Metapontion,| |Lucania,| |Italy,| |c.| |350| |-| |275| |B.C.||AE| |14|
The unusual blue encrustation on this coin is "Egyptian Blue," calcium copper silicate, a reaction of the copper with sand, lime, and natron. In crushed form, it was one of the earliest Egyptian pigments.
GI95303. Bronze AE 14, Johnston Bronze 31; HN Italy 1666; HGC I 1136 (R2); SNG Munchen 1027; SNG Evans 229; Weber 804; BMC Italy p. , 177; Winterthur 391, VF/aF, fine style, encrustations, scratches, marks, corrosion, weight 2.043 g, maximum diameter 13.5 mm, die axis 270o, Metapontion (Metaponto, Italy) mint, c. 350 - 275 B.C.; obverse head of Demeter left, wreathed in grain; reverse barley kernel, M-E divided high across field, ant on left, AΓ monogram right; rare; $150.00 (€138.00)
 


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||dichalkon|
In 112, one or the greatest Roman historians, Publius Cornelius Tacitus, was Governor of the Roman province of Asia (in Anatolia). The surviving portions of his two major works - the Annals and the Histories - examine the reigns of the Roman Emperors Tiberius, Claudius, Nero and those who reigned in the Year of the Four Emperors.
RX93583. Bronze dichalkon, RPC Online III 4774 (9 spec.); SNG BnF IV 1178, Dattari-Savio 7249, Kampmann 27.525, Emmett 726 (R5), Geissen -, SNG Cop -, Choice VF, nice dark near black patina with earthen highlighting, some porosity, ragged irregular edge, reverse edge beveled, weight 1.701 g, maximum diameter 14.0 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 112 - 28 Aug 113 A.D.; obverse laureate head right; reverse oinochoe (one-handled jug for pouring wine), L - Iς (year 16) flanking in lower fields; scarce; $125.00 (€115.00)
 


Lot of 5 Roman Provincial Bronze Coins of Antioch Syria, c. 200 - 250 A.D.

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Lot| |of| |5| |Roman| |Provincial| |Bronze| |Coins| |of| |Antioch| |Syria,| |c.| |200| |-| |250| |A.D.||Lot|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity,” for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Antioch was renamed Theoupolis after it was nearly destroyed by an earthquake on 29 November 528. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east. 6th Century Antioch
LT88499. Bronze Lot, 5 Roman provincial coins of Antioch, Syria, 17.1mm - 23.0mm, Nice VF, desert patinas with highlighting earthen deposits, no additional identification, no tags or flips, the lot is the actual coins in the photograph; $120.00 (€110.40)
 


Judaea, Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator Under Claudius and Nero, 52 - 60 A.D.

|Antonius| |Felix|, |Judaea,| |Antonius| |Felix,| |Roman| |Procurator| |Under| |Claudius| |and| |Nero,| |52| |-| |60| |A.D.||prutah|
In 54 A.D., violence erupted in Caesarea in response to a local ordinance restricting the rights of Jews. Jews and pagans clashed. The Roman garrison, made up of Syrians, sided with the pagans. Jews, armed with clubs and swords, gathered in the marketplace. Antonius Felix ordered his troops to charge. Violence continued and Felix asked Nero to arbitrate. Nero, sided with the pagans only increasing the Jews' anger.
JD97346. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1347; Meshorer TJC 342; BMC Palestine p. 261, 1; Sofaer Collection pl. 220, 62; RPC I 4970, Choice VF, centered, green patina, earthen deposits, parts of legends weak, obverse edge beveled, traces of pre-strike casting sprues, weight 2.378 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 54 A.D.; obverse IOY/ΛIA AΓ/PIΠΠI/NA (Julia Agrippina - wife of Claudius), within a wreath tied at the bottom with an X; reverse TI KΛAY∆IOC KAICAP ΓEPM (Tiberius Claudius Caesar Germanicus), two crossed palm fronds, L I∆ (year 14) below; $110.00 (€101.20) ON RESERVE


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip V or Perseus, 187 - 168 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |V| |or| |Perseus,| |187| |-| |168| |B.C.||AE| |21|
This coin was found in Southwestern Bulgaria (Serdi region) in 1997 alongside imitatives of the type struck by the Serdi Celts. The choice was appropriate for the Serdi Celts as the river Strymon runs through the Serdi region.
CE46744. Copper AE 21, SNG Cop 1299, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG Munchen,, VF, nice blue-green patina, weight 6.928 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 187 - 168 B.C.; obverse head of river-god, Strymon, right, with short horns and crown of reeds; reverse ornamented trident head, MAKE/∆ONΩN in two flanking upward lines, monograms below; ex Alex G. Malloy Serdi Celts Collection; scarce; $100.00 (€92.00)
 


Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus

|Lucilla|, |Lucilla,| |Augusta| |c.| |164| |-| |182| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Lucius| |Verus||sestertius|
For Roman wives, piety often meant accepting neglect. It was not considered adultery for a Roman husband to have sex with slaves or unmarried women. The historian Spartianus wrote that after Lucilla complained, Lucius Verus reproached her: "Uxor enim dignitatis nomen est, non voluptatis" (Wife is the name of dignity, not bliss).
RB79813. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 1756, BMCRE IV 1161, Cohen III 54, Hunter II 27, SRCV II 5505, F, glossy dark sea-green patina, light corrosion on obverse, rough areas on reverse, squared tight flan, weight 19.430 g, maximum diameter 30.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 164 - 166 A.D.; obverse LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right; reverse PIETAS, Pietas standing left, veiled, raising her right hand, perfume-box in left hand, flaming altar at feet on left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; $100.00 (€92.00)
 


Miletos, Ionia, c. 250 - 190 B.C.

|Miletos|, |Miletos,| |Ionia,| |c.| |250| |-| |190| |B.C.||AE| |10|
Didyma, on the coast of Ionia, was the largest and most significant sanctuary in the territory of the great classical city Miletus. It contained a temple and oracle of Apollo, the Didymaion. Next to Delphi, Didyma was the most renowned oracle of the Hellenic world, first mentioned among the Greeks in the Homeric Hymn to Apollo, but an establishment preceding literacy and even the Hellenic colonization of Ionia. The 6th century Didymaion, enclosed its smaller predecessor. Its treasury was enriched by gifts from Croesus. To approach it, visitors would follow the Sacred Way to Didyma, about 17 km long. Along the way, were ritual way stations, and statues of members of the Branchidae family, male and female, as well as animal figures. Some of these statues, dating to the 6th century B.C. are now in the British Museum, taken by Charles Newton in the 19th century. The ruins of Didyma are located at a short distance to the northwest of modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.The Didymaion
GB92088. Bronze AE 10, cf. Deppert-Lippitz 600 ff.; BMC Ionia p. 194, 108 ff.; SNG Cop 993; Weber 6053; SNGvA 2031 (various magistrates), Nice VF, green patina with buff earthen highlighting, tight flan, weight 1.222 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, die axis 0o, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, c. 250 - 190 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo facing slightly left; reverse lion standing right, looking back at star above, magistrate's name in exergue (off flan); ex Tom Cederlind; $100.00 (€92.00)
 


Gambrion, Mysia, 4th Century B.C.

|Other| |Mysia|, |Gambrion,| |Mysia,| |4th| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |9|
Gambrium (or Gambrion, Gambreium or Gambreion) was a town of ancient Aeolis and of Mysia, quite close to Pergamum. It is on a hill named Hisarlik in the Bakirçay valley and very close to modern town of Poyracik in Izmir province, Turkey. The name of Gambrion is seen first in the book of Anabasis of Xenophon which discusses the region in 399 B.C. At that time the ruler of the city was Gorgion and the earliest coins of the city bear his name. Gambrion peaked during the rule of the Pergamon Kingdom in the third and second centuries B.C.
GB96089. Bronze AE 9, von Fritze Mysiens, p. 142, 419; SNG BnF 938; SNG Cop 145; Waddington 777, VF, nice green patina, tight flan, obverse a little off center, weight 0.609 g, maximum diameter 8.9 mm, die axis 225o, Gambrion (Poyracik, Izmir, Turkey) mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo left; reverse ΓA-M (counterclockwise from below - ), facing gorgoneion, neat hair, protruding tongue; very rare; $100.00 (€92.00)
 




  



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