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The Numismatic Chronicle 1970

|Periodicals| |&| |Journals|, |The| |Numismatic| |Chronicle| |1970|
The Royal Numismatic Society publication. The Numismatic Chronicle is one of the most important journals on ancient and medieval numismatics.
BK20467. The Numismatic Chronicle 1970, hardcover, cover age wear, 438 pages, 24 plates, lxvi; $13.00 (€10.66)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.|
Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. Emperors frequently made vows to Jupiter for protection. The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored emperors and kings, those in positions of authority similar to his own.
RA94174. Billon antoninianus, Gφbl MIR 641a, RIC V-1 S214, RSC IV 382a, Hunter IV S85, SRCV III 10244, aF, well centered, ragged edge, weight 2.174 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 315o, 11th officina, Rome mint, 264 - 266 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse IOVI PROPVGNAT (Jupiter the defender), Jupiter advancing left left, head right, nude but for cloak flying out behind, brandishing thunderbolt in right, XI left; $32.00 (€26.24)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip V or Perseus, 187 - 168 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |V| |or| |Perseus,| |187| |-| |168| |B.C.|
Philip V was king of Macedonia, 221 - 179 B.C. Philip's reign was principally marked by an unsuccessful struggle with the emerging power of the Roman Republic. He would lead Macedonia against Rome in the First and Second Macedonian Wars, losing the latter but allying with Rome in the Roman-Seleucid War towards the end of his reign. Perseus was the last king of the Antigonid dynasty who ruled in Macedonia, 179 - 168 B.C. After Perseus lost the Battle of Pydna on 22 June 168 B.C., Macedonia came under Roman rule.
GB97605. Copper AE 23, SNG Cop 1298, AMNG III 14, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG Munchen -, F, dark blue-green patina, crackled rough surface, light earthen deposits, small edge splits, weight 8.393 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 187 - 168 B.C.; obverse head of river-god, Strymon, right, with short horns and crown of reeds; reverse ornamented trident head, MAKE/∆ONΩN in two flanking upward lines, monograms flanking shaft socket; from the Michael Arslan Collection; scarce; $70.00 (€57.40)


Lot of 32 Roman Coins - Includes Scarcer Late Roman Rulers, 80 - 450 A.D.

|Roman| |Bulk| |Lots|, |Lot| |of| |32| |Roman| |Coins| |-| |Includes| |Scarcer| |Late| |Roman| |Rulers,| |80| |-| |450| |A.D.|
Consignor's list, not verified by FORVM but believed to be accurate:
1) Domitian and Domitia, Pergamum, Temple, RPC II 918, aF.
2) Sabina, AE20, Magnesia, Lydia, Cop. 260. F.
3) Caracalla as Caesar, AE17, Nikopolis, Moesia Inferior, Concordia standing. VF.
4) Elagabalus, AE18, Petra, Decapolis, Tyche seated left. Spijkerman 55. F.
5) Julia Paula, AE28, Tarsus, aF.
6) Macrinus, AE17, Antioch, F.
7) Diadumenian as Caesar, AE23, Deultum, Thrace, F, cleaned.
8) Philip II as Caesar, AE25, Anazarbus, Cilicia, Capricorn left. Fair.
9) Divus Valerian II, antoninianus, Altar, VF. RIC 24.
10) Tetricus I, AE minimi, c. 273 AD, gVF.
11) Tacitus, tetradrachm, Alexandria, Eagle right, Dattari 5519.
12) Florian, antoninianus, RIC 57. F, slight bend.
13) Macrianus, antoninianus, VF, slight bend.
14) Diocletian, AE antoninianus, VF.
15) Constantine I, AE3, Sol standing. London. VF.
16) Theodora, AE4, Pietas, Trier, RIC 43.
17) Crispus Caesar, AE3, VF. 18) Fausta, AE3, VF.
19) Constantine II as Caesar, AE3, Campgate, VF.
20) Jovian, AE3, VF.
21) Magnus Maximus, AE2, VF.
22) Gratian, AE2, Emperor raising captive, VF, flat area.
23) Valens, AE3, Victory, VF.
24) Theodosius I, clipped AR siliqua, Milan mint, VF.
25) Aelia Eudoxia, AE3, F.
26) Aelia Flaccilla, AE2, F.
27) Honorius, AE4, Victory, VF.
28) Arcadius, AE4, Victory, VF.
29) Theodosius II, AE nummus, Cross in wreath. VF.
30) Johannes, AE nummus, Victory. F.
31) Leo and Verina, AE nummus, VF.
32) Marcian, AE nummus, monogram, F.
31) Zeno, AE nummus, monogram, F.
32) Unidentified.
LT96224. Mixed Lot, 32 Roman coins, includes scarcer late Roman rulers, Roman provincials aF, the late Roman imperial coins F to VF, a couple have slight bends, several have porosity, the actual coins in the photograph, a dozen with Moneta Numismatics flips and tags, the rest in a mixed bag without tags or flips, as-is, no returns; $760.00 (€623.20)


Judaean Kingdom, John Hyrcanus I (Yehohanan), 134 - 104 B.C., for the Seleukid King Antiochus VII

|John| |Hyrcanus| |I|, |Judaean| |Kingdom,| |John| |Hyrcanus| |I| |(Yehohanan),| |134| |-| |104| |B.C.,| |for| |the| |Seleukid| |King| |Antiochus| |VII|
Hendin lists four varieties of this type AΠP (year 181) below (Hendin 1131), AΠP (year 181) beside the anchor on left (Hendin 1131a), BΠP (year 182) below (Hendin 1131b), and BΠP (year 182) beside the anchor on left (Hendin 1131c). Houghton and Lorber list a variety without a date (Houghton-Lorber 2123), but the date is probably just off flan, as on this example.
JD97438. Bronze AE 16, Houghton-Lorber II 2123, Hendin 1131, SGCV II 7101, HGC 9 1103, Meshorer TJC p. 30, VF, green patina, porosity/corrosion, earthen encrustations, obverse edge beveled, weight 2.871 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 180o, Jerusalem mint, 132 - 130 B.C.; obverse lily on stem with two leaves, dot border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY EYEPΓETOY (Greek: of King Antiochus, Benefactor), anchor, upside down, AΠP or BΠP (Greek: year 181 or 182 of the Seleucid Era) below; $120.00 (€98.40)


Roman Republic and Central Italy, Aes Rude, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C.

|before| |211| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic| |and| |Central| |Italy,| |Aes| |Rude,| |c.| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.|
In Italy, as with other nations, early trade used a system of barter. Aes rude (Latin: "rough bronze"), used perhaps as early as the early 8th century B.C., was the earliest metal proto-currency in central Italy. In the 5th century B.C., bronze replaced cattle as the primary measure of value in trade. Aes rude are rough lumpy bronze ingots with no marks or design, some are flat and oblong, others are square, while many are irregular and shapeless. The metal is mostly copper with roughly 5% tin. Weight varies considerably with some exceeding twelve pounds and others under an ounce. Many smaller examples are fragments of broken larger specimens. A balance was necessary to measure value for commercial transactions.
RR95743. Bronze Aes Rude, cf. BMCRR I p. 1, Haeberlin pl. 1, Vecchi ICC pl. 1, Thurlow-Vecchi pl. 2, Bertol-Farac pl. 1, SRCV I 505; maximum length 54.4mm, weight 83.917g, broken and well worn fragment of an ingot, weight 83.917 g, maximum diameter 54.5 mm, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C.; $160.00 (€131.20)


Roman Republic and Central Italy, Aes Rude, Middle 5th - 4th Century B.C.

|before| |211| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic| |and| |Central| |Italy,| |Aes| |Rude,| |Middle| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.|
In Italy, as with other nations, early trade used a system of barter. Aes rude (Latin: "rough bronze"), used perhaps as early as the early 8th century B.C., was the earliest metal proto-currency in central Italy. In the 5th century B.C., bronze replaced cattle as the primary measure of value in trade. Aes rude are rough lumpy bronze ingots with no marks or design, some are flat and oblong, others are square, while many are irregular and shapeless. The metal is mostly copper with roughly 5% tin. Weight varies considerably with some exceeding twelve pounds and others under an ounce. Many smaller examples are fragments of broken larger specimens. A scale was necessary to measure value for commercial transactions.
RR95747. Bronze Aes Formatum, cf. BMCRR I p. 1, Haeberlin pl. 1, Vecchi ICC pl. 1, Thurlow-Vecchi pl. 2, Bertol-Farac pl. 1, SRCV I 505; maximum length 63.5mm, weight 215.456g, c. 5th - 4th Century B.C.; $190.00 (€155.80)


Neapolis, Campania, Italy, 275 - 250 B.C., Possibly an Ancient Counterfeit

|Italy|, |Neapolis,| |Campania,| |Italy,| |275| |-| |250| |B.C.,| |Possibly| |an| |Ancient| |Counterfeit|
Naples is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. Bronze Age Greek settlements were established in the second millennium B.C. The city was refounded as Neapolis in the sixth century B.C. and became an important hub of Magna Graecia, playing a key role in the merging of Greek culture into Roman society. Naples remained influential under Rome and more so after the fall of the Western Roman Empire, serving as the capital city of the Kingdom of Naples between 1282 and 1816. Thereafter, it became the capital of the Two Sicilies until the unification of Italy in 1861.
GI95913. Silver drachm, cf. Sambon 546 (controls); SNG BnF 865 (same); SNG ANS 420 (same); HN Italy 588; HGC Italy 456 (R2) (all solid silver, official, none with BΦ), F, a few bumps, encrustations, corrosion, no clear core exposure but the weight is light and signs of possible plating exist, perhaps a silver plated fouree, weight 3.092 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Neapolis or unofficial(?) mint, 275 - 250 B.C.; obverse diademed head of nymph (Parthenope?) left, BΦ behind neck; reverse man-faced bull (river-god Achelous) walking right, head turned facing, Nike above flying right and placing wreath on bull's head, IΣ below, NEOΠOΛITHΣ exergue; apparently unpublished with BΦ behind the Nymph's neck, we were unable to find another specimen with this control mark; from the Errett Bishop Collection; very rare; $130.00 (€106.60)


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

|Roman| |Macedonia|, |Roman| |Macedonia,| |"Thasian"| |Type,| |c.| |148| |-| |80| |B.C.|
This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS95927. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XII, monogram 6, 759 var. (VAE1/R603); Lanz (Kostial) 963 - 967; SNG Cop 1040 ff., Choice VF, toned, light graffito (AP?) obverse right, bumps and marks, edge crack, weight 16.835 g, maximum diameter 31.7 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, (MH monogram) inner left; $210.00 (€172.20)


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, William of Villehardouin, 1246 - 1278

|Crusaders|, |Crusaders,| |Frankish| |Greece,| |Principality| |of| |Achaea,| |William| |of| |Villehardouin,| |1246| |-| |1278|
William of Villehardouin became Prince of Achaea when his brother Geoffrey II died in 1246. He conquered the remaining Peloponnese territory and built the fortress of Mistra near Sparta. In 1249 he accompanied Louis IX of France on the Seventh Crusade, joining him in Cyprus with 400 knights and 28 ships. Louis gave him a license to mint coins in the style of royal French money. William defeated Venice in the War of the Euboeote Succession and defeated the Duke of Athens in 1258, reaffirming his power over the duchy. In 1259 he formed an alliance with the Byzantine Despotate of Epirus against Nicaea. He led the Achaean forces against the Nicaeans, but the Epirote army deserted and William was defeated. He fled and hid under a haystack, but was captured. He remained captive until 1262 and permanently lost all his power.Arms_of_Achaea
CR96932. Billon denier tournois, Metcalf Crusaders pl. 39, 940; Malloy Crusaders 10a; Tzamalis Frankish GV224; Schlumberger pl. XII, 12, F, uneven strike with part of obverse legend weak, light marks and deposits, slightly off center, tiny edge splits, weight 0.735 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 235o, Corinth mint, 1246 - 1278; obverse +:G:PRINCE ACh', cross pattιe within inner border; reverse DCLARENTIAV, castle tournois, spire in the form of Λ, surmounted by cross dividing legend; from the Louis G Estate; $110.00 (€90.20)




  







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