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Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |III| |Arrhidaeus| |and| |Alexander| |IV,| |323| |-| |317| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great|
Struck shortly after Alexander's death during the joint reign of Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother, Philip III, and Alexander's infant son with Roxana, Alexander IV. Kolophon also struck coins during this period in the name of Philip. Traditionally coins naming Alexander have been attributed to Alexander III the Great, but undoubtedly the Alexander named on this coin was the infant son of Roxana, Alexander IV. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who only intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Olympias was Alexander the Great's mother and Alexander IV's grandmother, but not Philip III's mother. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by the boy's regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C. The ruins of Kolophon are south of the town Degirmendere Fev in the Menderes district of Izmir Province, Turkey.
GS98704. Silver drachm, Price 1750, Müller Alexander 313, HGC 3.1 944c, SNG Cop -, aVF, bumps and scratches, tight flan, weight 4.164 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, feet on footstool, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, barley grain kernel left, spear head upright right, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right; $250.00 (€205.00)


Imitative Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, c. 970 - 980 A.D.

|Anonymous| |Folles|, |Imitative| |Byzantine| |Anonymous| |Follis| |of| |Christ,| |c.| |970| |-| |980| |A.D.|
Of this type of imitative, Lampinen writes, "The second phase of Balkan coinage production goes into high gear with the introduction of the anonymous follis series during the reign of John I (969 - 976). The explicit Christian imagery must have struck a chord with the recently converted Balkan masses because the official mint issues were accompanied by a fair quantity of copies, to meet the excess demand. These Christian issues would also be the prototypes for the initial coinage of several medieval Christian states, such as the first Crusader issues of Edessa and Antioch, medieval Armenia and distant Georgia in the Caucasus."
BZ89911. Bronze anonymous follis, See Lampinen Imitative p. 154 for a similar imitative; for the likely prototype cf. official Byzantine anonymous class A1 folles; SBCV 1793, VF, green patina, double struck, porous, crude and blundered, weight 6.880 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, unofficial (Balkan?) mint, c. 970 - 980 A.D.; obverse facing bust of Christ, wears nimbus cruciger ornamented with two pellets in each limb of cross, pallium, and colobium, Gospels in both hands, blundered imitation of the abbreviation: IC - XC (Greek: Ihsoús Xristós - Jesus Christ) across field; reverse blundered inscription imitating: + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Greek: Jesus Christ King of Kings); rare this crude; $135.00 (€110.70)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

|Nikopolis|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Nikopolis| |ad| |Istrum,| |Moesia| |Inferior|
Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101-106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town peaked during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty. In 447, Nicopolis was destroyed by Attila's Huns. In the 6th century, it was rebuilt as a powerful fortress enclosing little more than military buildings and churches, following a very common trend for the cities of that century in the Danube area. It was finally destroyed by the Avar invasions at the end of the 6th century.
RP96501. Bronze AE 26, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.17.15.1 (R6), AMNG I/I 1455, Varbanov I 2900 (R7), Moushmov 1029, SNG Cop -, aF, etched surfaces, edge crack, central depressions, weight 9.936 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 180o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, consular legate Aurelius Gallus, 201 - 203 A.D.; obverse IYΛIA ∆OMNA CEBA, draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, large chignon at back of head; reverse YΠ AYP ΓAΛΛOY - NIKOΠOΛITΩNOC, ΠPOC IC (ending in exergue), Aphrodite Pudica, nude, standing facing, covering her private parts with her hands, Eros stands at her left, wreath in right hand, torch downward in right hand; rare; $70.00 (€57.40)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Ancient Counterfeit

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Ancient| |Counterfeit|
Isis was the goddess of motherhood and fertility in Ancient Egyptian religious beliefs, whose worship spread throughout the Greco-Roman world. In later myths about Isis, she had a brother, Osiris, who became her husband, and she then was said to have conceived Horus.
MA96710. Fouree silver plated denarius, cf. RSC III 174, RIC IV S577, SRCV II 6606 (official, silver, Rome mint), VF, unusual style, about 1/4 of the bronze core is exposed, weight 2.450 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, unofficial criminal mint, c. 196 - 211 A.D.; obverse IVLIE AVGVSTA (sic), draped bust right; reverse SAECVLI FELICITAS (retrograde), Isis nursing the infant Horus, standing left with right foot on prow, anchor rests against altar behind (the entire reverse, not just the legend, is a reverse of the official type); $70.00 (€57.40)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

|Nikopolis|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Nikopolis| |ad| |Istrum,| |Moesia| |Inferior|
The figure on the reverse is most often identified as Eros (Cupid) or a generic winged Genius. The inverted torch represents a life extinguished, indicating the figure is Thanatos (death). By the Severan Era, there was increased hope for an afterlife in pleasant Elysium rather than in dismal Hades. Thanatos was associated more with a gentle passing than a woeful demise. Thanatos as a winged boy, very much akin to Cupid, with crossed legs and an inverted torch, became the most common symbol for death, depicted on many Roman sarcophagi.
RP97238. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.14.16.16 (R3), Moushmov 926, AMNG I/I 1367 (R3) var. (leg.), Varbanov I 2481 (R3) var. (obv. leg., bust), BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, F, rough, edge ragged, part of reverse legend not struck, weight 3.040 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 30o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse AV KAI CEVHP, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC I, winged Thanatos standing right, legs crossed legs, leaning on reversed torch on right set on low base; scarce; $60.00 (€49.20)


Numismatica ARS Classica Auction 99, May 2017, The George W. La Borde Collection of Roman Aurei - Part II

|Roman| |Books|, |Numismatica| |ARS| |Classica| |Auction| |99,| |May| |2017,| |The| |George| |W.| |La| |Borde| |Collection| |of| |Roman| |Aurei| |-| |Part| |II|
Special Auction, The George W. La Borde Collection of Roman Aurei - Part II, sold in association with Stack's Bowers Galleries.
BC15992. Numismatica ARS Classica Auction 99, May 2017, The George W. La Borde Collection of Roman Aurei - Part II, softcover, 43 pages, 50 lots, illustrated throughout, good condition; $6.00 (€4.92)


Numismatica ARS Classica Auction 58, Zurich, April 2011, Restelli Collection (Knights of St. John)

|Medieval| |&| |Modern| |Books|, |Numismatica| |ARS| |Classica| |Auction| |58,| |Zurich,| |April| |2011,| |Restelli| |Collection| |(Knights| |of| |St.| |John)|
Special Auction - The Restelli Collection, coins and medals from the Knights of St. John (Rhodes and Malta).
BC16219. Numismatica ARS Classica Auction 58, Zurich, April 2011, The Restelli Collection, coins and medals from the Knights of St. John, softcover, 94 pages, 481 lots, illustrated throughout, good condition, small wear, only one copy available; $16.00 (€13.12)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip V or Perseus, 187 - 168 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |V| |or| |Perseus,| |187| |-| |168| |B.C.|
This coin was found in Southwestern Bulgaria (Serdi region) in 1997 alongside imitatives of the type struck by the Serdi Celts. The choice was appropriate for the Serdi Celts as the river Strymon runs through the Serdi region.
GB46739. Copper AE 23, SNG Cop 1299, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG Munchen,, VF, dark green patina, porous, weight 7.113 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 187 - 168 B.C.; obverse head of river-god, Strymon, right, with short horns and crown of reeds; reverse ornamented trident head, MAKE/∆ONΩN in two flanking upward lines, monograms below; ex Alex G. Malloy Serdi Celts Collection; scarce; $60.00 (€49.20)


Die Spätrömische Kupferprägung, Ein Bestimmungsbuch Für Schlecht Erhaltene Münzen Guido Bruck, 1961

|Roman| |Books|, |Die| |Spätrömische| |Kupferprägung,| |Ein| |Bestimmungsbuch| |Für| |Schlecht| |Erhaltene| |Münzen| |Guido| |Bruck,| |1961|
The Late Roman Copper Coinage, An Identification Book For Badly Preserved Coins, by Guido Bruck,
BK20005. Die Spätrömische Kupferprägung, Ein Bestimmungsbuch Für Schlecht Erhaltene Münzen, 1961 by Guido Bruck, in German, hardcover, 101 pages, illustrated; $70.00 (€57.40)


Lastigi, Hispania Ulterior, 150 - 100 B.C.

|Roman| |Hispania|, |Lastigi,| |Hispania| |Ulterior,| |150| |-| |100| |B.C.|
After its defeat in 201 B.C., Carthage ceded Iberia to Rome. In 197 B.C., the peninsula was divided into Hispania Citerior (Nearer Hispania) and Hispania Ulterior (Further Hispania). Hispania Ulterior consisted of what are now Andalusia, Portugal, Extremadura, Castilla y León, Galicia, Asturias, Cantabria, and the Basque Country. There was peace in the region until 155 B.C. when the Lusitanians attacked. The area was largely conquered by 138 B.C., but war continued until 19 B.C. when Agrippa defeated the Cantabrians in Hispania Citerior and Hispania finally was completely conquered. That same year, Augustus divided Hispania Ulterior into Baetica (modern Andalusia) and Lusitania (modern Portugal, Extremadura, and part of Castilla-León). Hispania Citerior, which now included Cantabria and Basque country, was renamed Hispania Tarraconensis.
GB93425. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 2374 (R3), SNG BM Spain 1569 - 1571, Villaronga 4, SNG Cop 165, aF, dark tone, porous, weight 3.504 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 270o, Lastigi (Sancular la Mayor, Sevilla, Spain) mint, 150 - 100 B.C.; obverse helmeted male head right, laurel wreath border; reverse LAS within laurel wreath border; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $70.00 (€57.40)




  







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