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Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

|Postumus|, |Gallic| |Empire,| |Postumus,| |Summer| |260| |-| |Spring| |269| |A.D.|
This coin is dedicated to the goddess Fides for her good quality of preserving the public peace by keeping the army true to its allegiance. Unfortunately for Postumus, Fides is only an imaginary goddess, his disgruntled troops killed him after he refused to allow them to sack Moguntiacum (Mainz, Germany).
RB98102. Orichalcum double sestertius, RIC V-2 123, Cohen VI 74, Bastien Postume 77, Mairat 189, Hunter IV 101, SRCV III 11040, gF, obverse a little off center, parts of legends weak/unstruck, minor edge split, minor porosity, weight 18.031 g, maximum diameter 32.7 mm, die axis 180o, Treveri (Trier, France) mint, 3rd bronze emission, 261 A.D.; obverse IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse FIDES MILITVM (the loyalty of the soldiers), Fides Militum standing facing, head left, flanked by two signum, one in each hand; ex CGB Numismatique Paris; $270.00 SALE PRICE $243.00


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

|Constantine| |II|, |Constantine| |II,| |22| |May| |337| |-| |March| |or| |April| |340| |A.D.|
In 328 Arelatum was renamed Constantia in honor of Constantine II. After Constantine II was killed in 340, the name reverted to Arelate, only to be changed again in 354 to Constantia by Constantius II. It retained that name, although the mintmark 'AR' appeared on some of its coins even in the fifth century.
RL98421. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Arles 319, LRBC I 330, Depeyrot EMA 39/2, SRCV V 17224, Cohen VII 165, Hunter V -, Choice gVF, excellent centering, much silvering, weight 3.402 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Constantia-Arelatum (Arles, France) mint, as caesar, 328 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse PROVIDENTIAE CAESS (to the foresight of the two princes), campgate, six rows of bricks, two turrets, no doors, star above, S - F across field and TCONST in exergue; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Judean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 104 - 76 B.C., Overstrike

|Alexander| |Jannaeus|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |Jannaeus| |(Yehonatan),| |104| |-| |76| |B.C.,| |Overstrike|
This type has been reattributed from Hyrcanus II to Alexander Jannaeus by Hendin and Shachar in "The Identity of YNTN on Hasmonean Overstruck Coins and the Chronology of the Alexander Jannaeus Types," Israel Numismatic Research 3, 2008: 87-94. It appears this type was overstruck on earlier coins of Alexander Jannaeus that had never been released from the mint.
JD97686. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6185a, Meshorer TJC T, Meshorer AJC I; undertype Hendin 1148 (Jannaeus, lily/anchor), aVF, overstruck, light earthen deposits, reverse edge beveled, remnants of pre-strike casting sprues, weight 2.597 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 180o, Jerusalem mint, 103 - 76 B.C.; obverse Paleo-Hebrew inscription: Yonatan the High Priest and the Council of the Jews, within wreath, struck over anchor; reverse double cornucopia with pomegranate between horns, struck over lily; from an Israeli collection; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


The First Jewish Revolt, 66 - 70 A.D.

|First| |Jewish| |Revolt|, |The| |First| |Jewish| |Revolt,| |66| |-| |70| |A.D.|
Vespasian, along with legions X Fretensis and V Macedonica, landed at Ptolemais in April 67. There he was joined by his son Titus, who arrived from Alexandria at the head of Legio XV Apollinaris, as well as by the armies of various local allies including that of King Agrippa II. Fielding more than 60,000 soldiers, Vespasian began operations by subjugating Galilee. Many towns gave up without a fight, although others had to be taken by force. Of these, Josephus provides detailed accounts of the sieges of Yodfat and Gamla. By the year 68, Jewish resistance in the north had been crushed, and Vespasian made Caesarea Maritima his headquarters and methodically proceeded to clear the coast. -- Wikipedia
JD97728. Bronze prutah, Kadman III 12; Meshorer TJC 196a, Hendin 6389; SNG ANS 427; Sofaer pl. 222, 11, aVF, green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan, a little off center, irregular edge, weight 2.643 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 90o, Jerusalem mint, year 2, 67 - 68 A.D.; obverse Paleo-Hebrew: Year two, amphora with fluted body, narrow neck, broad rim, and two small curved handles; reverse Paleo-Hebrew: The freedom of Zion, vine leaf on small branch with tendril; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Lot of 68+ Julio-Claudian Roman Provincial Bronze Coins, c. 30 B.C. - 68 A.D.

|Roman| |Bulk| |Lots|, |Lot| |of| |68+| |Julio-Claudian| |Roman| |Provincial| |Bronze| |Coins,| |c.| |30| |B.C.| |-| |68| |A.D.|
 
LT96196. Bronze Lot, Lot of 68+ Julio-Claudian Roman provincial bronzes (plus cut or broken coins), mostly from Spain but several from other regions, Fair - aF, c. 30 B.C. - 68 A.D.; unattributed, no tags or flips, the actual coins in the photographs, as-is, no returns; $490.00 SALE PRICE $441.00


Maximinus II Daia, Late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D.

|Maximinus| |II|, |Maximinus| |II| |Daia,| |Late| |309| |-| |30| |April| |313| |A.D.|
Sol Invictus ("Unconquered Sun") was the official sun god of the late Empire and a patron of soldiers. In 274, Aurelian made it an official cult alongside the traditional Roman cults. Scholars disagree whether the new deity was a re-foundation of the ancient Latin cult of Sol, a revival of the cult of Elagabalus, or completely new. The god was favored by emperors after Aurelian and appeared on their coins until Constantine. The last inscription referring to Sol Invictus dates to 387 A.D. and there were enough devotees in the 5th century that Augustine found it necessary to preach against them.
RT97848. Billon follis, Hunter V 110 (also 8th officina), RIC VI Antiochia 167b, SRCV IV 14894, Cohen VII 161, VF, well centered, porous, some pitting, weight 4.614 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, 8th officina Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 312 A.D.; obverse IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse SOLI INVICTO (to the invincible sun god), Sol standing facing, head left, radiate, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, head of Serapis wearing kalathos in left hand, H left, star right, ANT in exergue; from a Norwegian collection; $60.00 SALE PRICE $54.00


Tarsos, Cilicia, c. 95 - 80 B.C.

|Cilicia|, |Tarsos,| |Cilicia,| |c.| |95| |-| |80| |B.C.|
Sandan was a Hittite-Babylonian sun, storm, or warrior god, also perhaps associated with agriculture. The Greeks equated Sandan with Herakles (Hercules). At Tarsus an annual festival honored Sandan-Herakles, which climaxed when an image of the god was burned on a funeral pyre.
GB97885. Bronze AE 21, BMC Lycaonia p. 180, 111; SNG BnF 1324; SNG Cop 340 var. (different controls); SNG Levante 949 var. (same), aVF, green patina, copper high spots, light earthen deposits, light marks, weight 5.589 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, c. 95 - 80 B.C.; obverse veiled and turreted head of Tyche right; reverse Sandan cult image standing right on horned and winged animal, on a garlanded base and within a pyramidal pyre surmounted by an eagle, TAPΣEΩN downward on right, KA / MI / monogram (controls) downward in a column on left; from a Norwegian collection; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00


The First Jewish Revolt, 66 - 70 A.D.

|First| |Jewish| |Revolt|, |The| |First| |Jewish| |Revolt,| |66| |-| |70| |A.D.|
Vespasian, along with legions X Fretensis and V Macedonica, landed at Ptolemais in April 67. There he was joined by his son Titus, who arrived from Alexandria at the head of Legio XV Apollinaris, as well as by the armies of various local allies including that of King Agrippa II. Fielding more than 60,000 soldiers, Vespasian began operations by subjugating Galilee. Many towns gave up without a fight, although others had to be taken by force. Of these, Josephus provides detailed accounts of the sieges of Yodfat and Gamla. By the year 68, Jewish resistance in the north had been crushed, and Vespasian made Caesarea Maritima his headquarters and methodically proceeded to clear the coast. -- Wikipedia
JD97726. Bronze prutah, Kadman III 12; Meshorer TJC 196a, Hendin 6389; SNG ANS 427; Sofaer pl. 222, 11, VF/F, tight flan, earthen encrustation, irregular edge from removal of pre-strike casting sprues, weight 3.205 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 90o, Jerusalem mint, year 2, 67 - 68 A.D.; obverse Paleo-Hebrew: Year two, amphora with fluted body, narrow neck, broad rim, and two small curved handles; reverse Paleo-Hebrew: The freedom of Zion, vine leaf on small branch with tendril; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00


Roman, Large Iron Borer or File, 1st - 3rd Century A.D.

|Roman| |Antiquities|, |Roman,| |Large| |Iron| |Borer| |or| |File,| |1st| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.|
Another piece from the same group as this borer was dated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to 120 A.D. with a probable range of 80 A.D. - 160 A.D. Testing was done using an innovative technique which measures the carbon isotope ratio of the trace carbon in the iron. This carbon comes from the wood used in the production of the iron which must be of essentially the same age as the tool itself. Results were published in the journal, Radiocarbon, Summer 2001.
AE61804. Roman borer, cf. Petrie, 'Tools and Weapons', pl. LXV, 40; 7 inches, indent at one end for attaching handle, $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|
Spes was the Roman personification of Hope. In art, Spes is normally depicted carrying flowers or a cornucopia, but on coins she is almost invariably depicted holding a flower in her extended right hand, while the left is raising a fold of her dress. She was also named "ultima dea" - for Hope is the last resort of men. This coin advertises Carausius as the source of hope for the people.
RA73259. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 1010, Webb Carausius 2235, Cohen VII 339, King Unmarked -, SRCV IV -, Hunter IV -, aVF, centered on a broad flan, green patina with red earthen deposits, legends weak, weight 3.311 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 225o, unmarked (Londinium?) mint, c. mid 286 - 287; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SPES PVBLICA (the hope of the public), Spes walking left, flower in right hand, lifting skirt with left hand, no mintmarks; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; $55.00 SALE PRICE $49.50




  







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