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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Greece ▸ Other GreeceView Options:  |  |  | 

Other Greece

Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus or Antigonus II Gonatus, 306 - 270 B.C.

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Unpublished in the standard references and not yet fully attributed, this is only the second specimen of this extremely rare and important drachm known to Forum. Both specimens were struck with the same reverse die. Gorny & Mosch wrote of their specimen: "Troxell recorded a very rare issue of Alexandrine tetradrachms in the name of Gonatas (The Peloponnesian Alexanders, ANSMN 17, 1971, 75-6, note 68), which through hoard evidence was conclusively proven to be struck at Pella circa 272 (see R. W. Mathisen, Antigonus Gonatas and the Silver Coinages of Macedon circa 280-270 BC, ANSMN 26, 1981, pp. 79-123, esp. p. 104). However, this unique drachm has no controls that would explicitly tie it to the Pella mint tetradrachms, and even more perplexing is the style of the engraving, which is clearly dissimilar to the tetradrachms as well. One might suppose that it is in fact not a coin of Gonatas at all, but rather a hitherto unknown drachm of his grandfather, Antigonos I Monophthalmos. However, this also does not sit well, again for reasons of style, which is inconsistent with the period of Monophthalmos' reign. For the time being, therefore, this coin must remain a numismatic enigma until further evidence can shed additional light on it."

There are two auction records for the Gorny & Mosch specimen: Roma Numismatics auction 7 (22 Mar 2014), lot 454, sold for £ 4,800 plus fees; and Gorny & Mosch auction 203 (5 Mar 2012), lot 150, sold for € 3,200 plus fees. Our coin sold at Gitbud & Naumann auction 16, (4 May 2014), lot 152, apparently slipping through unnoticed by all but our astute consignor for € 575 plus fees.
SH71048. Silver drachm, unpublished in standard refs; cf. Roma Numismatics auction 7, lot 454 (same rev die) = Gorny & Mosch auction 203, lot 150, VF, reverse struck a bit flat, weight 3.845 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Greece or Macedonia mint, 306 - 270 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIΓONOY, Zeus Aetophoros enthroned left, throne with high back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back; ex Gitbud & Naumann auction 16, lot 152; extremely rare, only two know specimens; $1650.00 (Ä1468.50)


Megara, Megaris, Greece, 307 - 243 B.C.

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Megara is in West Attica, the northern section of the Isthmus of Corinth opposite the island of Salamis, which belonged to Megara in archaic times, before being taken by Athens. Megara was a trade port, its people using their ships and wealth as a way to gain leverage on armies of neighboring poleis. Megara specialized in exportation of wool and other animal products including livestock such as horses. It possessed two harbors, Pegae, to the west on the Corinthian Gulf and Nisaea, to the east on the Saronic Gulf of the Aegean Sea. Megara had 23,456 inhabitants at the 2011 census.
GB85282. Bronze AE 15, BCD Peloponnesos 9.5, SNG Cop 482, gF, weight 2.435 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, Megara mint, 307 - 243 B.C.; obverse prow of galley left; reverse two dolphins swimming clockwise around MEΓ within dotted border; ex CNG, ex BCD Collection; $130.00 (Ä115.70)


Skarpheia, Lokri Opuntii, Lokris, Greece, 3rd - 2nd Century B.C.

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BCD notes, "A remarkable, hitherto unknown coin of a rare mint with a reverse clearly inscribed SK on the left below the shield. The obverse style appears to be earlier rather than later; the coin therefore may have been struck during the third rather than the second century B.C."
GB49604. Bronze AE 12, BCD Lokris (NAC 55) 159.1 (this coin, otherwise unpublished), F, encrustations, weight 2.143 g, maximum diameter 12.2 mm, die axis 0o, Skarpheia mint, obverse head of Demeter right; reverse Ajax the Lesser advancing left, shield in left, sword in right, seen from ĺ behind (as on the Opuntii and Lokri drachms), SK on the left below the shield; ex BCD Collection, ex Numismatic Ars Classica Auction 55, 159.1; unique?; SOLD







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Catalog current as of Tuesday, September 26, 2017.
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Other Greece