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Sear_261a.jpg
Marc Antony & OctavianObv. M ANTON IMP III VIR R P C
bare head of Marc Antony right
Rev. CAESAR IMP III VIR R P C
bare head of Octavian right
Denarius, late 40 - early 39 BC, Southern or central Italian mint.
20 mm 3,393g SEAR 261a Crawford 528/2b
1 commentsPriscus10/26/21 at 17:17Jay GT4: Historic!
Sear_21_.jpg
Vibius PansaObv. PANSA
Head of young Bacchus or Liber right, wearing wreath of ivy tied with fillet
Rev. C VIBIVS C F C N
Ceres walking right, holding a lighted torch in each outstretched hand, plough before
Denarius, Rome 48 BC,
20 mm 3,743g SEAR 21 Crawford 449/2
Ex LVCERNAE Auction SECVNDA II number 105 10.10.2021
1 commentsPriscus10/26/21 at 03:10Jay GT4: Wonderful
votive_lead_1.jpg
BCC L5 Votive Lead Plaque Athena/MinervaLead Plaque
Athena/Minerva, facing, holding spear and
leaning on shield.
49.0 x 24.5mm Weight: 12.06gm.
(click for higher resolution)
2 commentsv-drome10/26/21 at 00:44Jay GT4: Nice!
VIM2C_082p_Hostilianus2C_AE-262C_C_VI_MOST_M_QVIHTVS_CAE2C_PMS_C_OL_VIM2C_AN-XII2C_251-AD_2C_Pick-1482C_PM-4-01-50var_2C_Q-0012C_0h2C_25-262C4mm2C_132C82g-s~0.jpg
082p Hostilianus (250-251 A.D. Caesar, 251 A.D. Augustus), Moesia, Viminacium, PM 04-01-50var. (or 51. new leged variation), -/-//AN XII, AE-Sestertius, #01082p Hostilianus (250-251 A.D. Caesar, 251 A.D. Augustus), Moesia, Viminacium, PM 04-01-50var. (or 51. new leged variation), -/-//AN XII, AE-Sestertius, #01
avers: C VI MOST M QVIHTVS CAE, Bare-headed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: P M S C-OL VIM, Moesia standing facing, head left, extending hands to bull, and the lion standing at feet on either side.
exergue: -/-//AN XII, diameter: 25,0-26,5mm, weight: 13,82g, axis: 0h,
mint: Moesia, Viminacium, date: 250-251 A.D.,
ref: Pick 148var, PM 04-01-50var. (or 51. new leged variation), Mus 54var,
Q-001
Pick-Martin described 50 avers/reverse legends variation, in this coin type, but this variation is not included.
2 commentsquadrans10/25/21 at 19:23Gerhard M: Nice and rare Coin Congrats Cool
Carus_Ant_MunzZentrum-smaller.jpeg
Carus Antoninianus 282-383 CEDenomination: Antoninianus
Era: 282-283 CE
Metal: AE/Billon
Obverse: IMP CARVS PF AVG. Mailed bust of Carus r. Radiate crown
Reverse: PAXE-XE-RCITI. In exergue, PXXI. Pax standing holding olive branch and standard
Mint: Ticinum
Weight: 3.29 g.
Reference: RIC 75 (Ticinum Mint)
Provenance: Munz Centrum auction, Sept 15 2021, lot 852

The history leading up to Diocletian’s historically significant reign must include the story of his rise to power. It started with the emperor Carus who made Diocletian commander of the Protectores domestici, the elite cavalry force directly attached to the Imperial household – a post that earned him the honour of a consulship in 283. As such, he took part in Carus's subsequent Persian campaign.

Carus was Killed during the successful War with Persia, leaving his sons Carinus and Numerian as the new Augusti.

Death of Numerian:
March 284 - Numerian was known to be in Emesa (Homes) Syria. It is believed to have been assassinated on his return journey to Rome. Aper, the prefect is traditionally believed to be the assasin. Coins were struck for Numerian as late as November 284

Rise of Diocletian:
November 284 -Numerian's generals and tribunes called a council for the succession, choosing Diocletian as emperor. After his accession, Diocletian and Lucius Caesonius Bassus were named as consuls in place of Carinus.

Over the winter of 284–85, Diocletian advanced west across the Balkans. His armies met Carinus's across the river Margus in Moesia. In the west, Carinus’s rule had become unpopular. When the Battle of Margus began, Carinus’s prefect Aristobulus defected. In the course of the battle, Carinus was killed by his own men. Following Diocletian's victory, both the western and the eastern armies acclaimed him as Emperor.
1 commentsSteve B510/25/21 at 18:40Jay GT4: Great details
votive_lead_1.jpg
BCC L5 Votive Lead Plaque Athena/MinervaLead Plaque
Athena/Minerva, facing, holding spear and
leaning on shield.
49.0 x 24.5mm Weight: 12.06gm.
(click for higher resolution)
2 commentsv-drome10/25/21 at 17:48Mayadigger: Sweet! Smile
Gordien_I.jpg
Gordian I denariusGordian I denarius. 238 AD.
3.10 grs.
Obs. : IMP M ANT GORDIANVS AFR AVG Laureate, draped and
cuirassed bust r.
Rev. SECVRITAS AVGG Securitas seated l., holding short sceptre.
Cohen 10. RIC 5.
5 commentslabienus10/25/21 at 17:29mix_val: Superb!
Philip_Wolf_sestertius.jpg
Philip I AD 244-249 Æ Sestertius (27x31mm, 15.79 g.)
Secular Games issue.
Rome mint, struck AD 249.
Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
Rev. SAECVLARES AVGG, she-wolf standing left, head right, suckling the twins Romulus and Remus.
RIC IV 159

Continuing the tradition of Claudius and Antoninus Pius before him, the celebration of the Secular Games at the end of every century since the founding of Rome culminated during the reign of Philip I, as the city celebrated her 1,000th anniversary in AD 248. The legends on these issues almost exclusively read Saeculares Augg, and feature a similar iconography from previous games, such as the she-wolf suckling the twins, the various wild beasts paraded through the amphitheater, and a cippus inscribed for the preservation of the memory of these events.
2 commentspaul188810/25/21 at 15:53Priscus: wow Laughing
VIM2C_082p_Hostilianus2C_AE-262C_C_VI_MOST_M_QVIHTVS_CAE2C_PMS_C_OL_VIM2C_AN-XII2C_251-AD_2C_Pick-1482C_PM-4-01-50var_2C_Q-0012C_0h2C_25-262C4mm2C_132C82g-s~0.jpg
082p Hostilianus (250-251 A.D. Caesar, 251 A.D. Augustus), Moesia, Viminacium, PM 04-01-50var. (or 51. new leged variation), -/-//AN XII, AE-Sestertius, #01082p Hostilianus (250-251 A.D. Caesar, 251 A.D. Augustus), Moesia, Viminacium, PM 04-01-50var. (or 51. new leged variation), -/-//AN XII, AE-Sestertius, #01
avers: C VI MOST M QVIHTVS CAE, Bare-headed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: P M S C-OL VIM, Moesia standing facing, head left, extending hands to bull, and the lion standing at feet on either side.
exergue: -/-//AN XII, diameter: 25,0-26,5mm, weight: 13,82g, axis: 0h,
mint: Moesia, Viminacium, date: 250-251 A.D.,
ref: Pick 148var, PM 04-01-50var. (or 51. new leged variation), Mus 54var,
Q-001
Pick-Martin described 50 avers/reverse legends variation, in this coin type, but this variation is not included.
2 commentsquadrans10/24/21 at 21:17Jay GT4: Nice green patina
Calabria_Italy_Taras_on_Dolphin.jpg
Calabria Italy Taras on DolphinTaras, Calabria, Italy, c. 272 - 240 B.C., Silver nomos, Unpublished(?); Vlasto 932 var. (different controls), SNG ANS 1239 var. (same), HN Italy 1044 var. (same), SNG Cop -, BMC Italy -, VF, 6.520g, 19.7mm, die axis 180°,
OBV: Nude warrior wearing crested helmet on horse standing left, holding shield on left arm, horse raising right foreleg, ET (control) before horse, API-ΣTΩN below divided by horse's left foreleg;
REV: Taras on dolphin left, kantharos in extended right hand, trident nearly vertical in left, ΓY (control) behind upper right, TAPAΣ below;

Very Rare variant. EX: Forum Ancient Coins

Taras, the only Spartan colony, was founded in 706 B.C. The founders were Partheniae ("sons of virgins"), sons of unmarried Spartan women and Perioeci (free men, but not citizens of Sparta).
These out-of-wedlock unions were permitted to increase the prospective number of soldiers (only the citizens could be soldiers) during the bloody Messenian wars. Later, however, when they were no longer
needed, their citizenship was retroactively nullified and the sons were obliged to leave Greece forever. Their leader, Phalanthus, consulted the oracle at Delphi and was told to make the harbor of Taranto
their home. They named the city Taras after the son of Poseidon, and of a local nymph, Satyrion. The reverse depicts Taras being saved from a shipwreck by a dolphin sent to him by Poseidon.
This symbol of the ancient Greek city is still the symbol of modern Taranto today.

1 commentsSRukke10/24/21 at 15:10Leo: rare type
Vlasto_1680.JPG
Dolphindidrachm.jpg
Calabria, TarentumPunic occupation half shekel

Nude youth on horseback to left, crowning horse with wreath; IΩ to right, ΣΩΓENHΣ below

Taras astride dolphin to left, holding cornucopiae and Nike who crowns him with wreath; TAPAΣ below.

Calabria, Tarentum ; Punic occupation, circa 212-209 BC

AR Reduced didrachm or Half-Shekel.

2.69g chipped otherwise VF+

Vlasto 975-7; HN Italy 1079; SNG France 2065; McGill II, 120 and Cote 591-93.

Ex-ANE

Rare!

The climax of the Carthaginian invasion of Italy was reached when Tarentum changed sides in 212 BC. The takeover of the city was a carefully planned coup by Hannibal and members of the city's democratic faction who opened the gates to Hannibal's army. The Carthaginians failed to take the citadel, but subsequent fortifications around this enemy stronghold enabled the city to remain under Punic control. Hannibal installed his own magistrates and struck coinage based on the Punic half shekel standard.
9 commentsJay GT410/24/21 at 15:05Leo: nice example, Jay
Calabria_Tarentum_SNG-ANS840.jpg
Calabria, Tarentum. Taras riding dolphin and Hippocamp.Greek Italy. Calabria, Tarentum. 500-480 BC. AR Nomos (8.18 gm). Taras (Phalanthos) riding dolphin l., arms outstretched, cockle shell below, TAPA∫. / Hippocamp swimming l. gVF. CNG 72 #73. SNG ANS 1 #840; SNG Cop 1 (Italy) #776; SNG France 6.1 #1600 (same dies)-1602; Fischer-Bossert group 7 #109b (V56/R71, 34 specimens). Same dies: Hermitage I #45; Hirsch 81; HN Italy 827; SNG Lloyd 117-118; Ravel Vlasto 133. cf HGC 1 #753.2 commentsAnaximander10/24/21 at 15:05Leo: good details on both sides
Calabria_Tarentum_SNG-ANS988.jpg
Calabria, Tarentum. Helmeted Horseman and Dolphin Rider Didrachm.Greek Italy. Calabria, Tarentum. 332-302 BC. AR Didrachm (7.78 gm). Helmeted horseman advancing r. with spear, holding shield and two spears; ΦIΛI below (magistrate Phili). / Taras (Phalanthos) on dolphin l., holding distaff and dolphin; ΦI to l., ivy leaf & TAPAΣ to r., waves below. EF. Pegasi 121 #40. Ex M.P. Vlasto collection. SNG ANS 1 #988-989 (same obverse die); SNG Cop 1 (Italy) #842; SNG France 6.1 #1833 (same obv. die)-1836; Fischer-Bossert 1090; HN Italy 934 (2); HGC 1 #800; Ravel Vlasto 589.3 commentsAnaximander10/24/21 at 15:04Leo: great horse
20201122_221328.jpg
Taras, Calabria 430-380 BC (Period II - Transitional)
AR Didrachm (22mm, 7.56g)
O: Warrior dismounting horse cantering left, holding small shield in left hand.
R: Phalanthos astride dolphin left, holding oval shield in left hand and helmet in extended right; TAP[AΣ] below.
Vlasto 398; Fischer-Bossert 327v; Evans II, C; cf SNG France 1703; cf McGill II, 12; SNG ANS 867v; Sear 334v; HN Italy 849
ex Aegean Numismatics

The earliest issues of Tarentine 'horsemen' depicted the dolphin rider on the obverse. Evans labelled this era Period I.
During the following period, which Evans called 'transitional', we start to see a shift to the more traditional horseman obverse with the dolphin rider moved to the reverse. By the end of Period II this format becomes universal.


4 commentsEnodia10/24/21 at 15:02Leo: nice get!
Taras1.jpg
Taras1 commentsBrennos10/24/21 at 15:00Leo: wonderful and rare
Vlasto_523.jpg
CALABRIA, Taras. Circa 340-332 BC. AR NomosAR. 7.87 g. 20.00 mm.
Obv. Ephebe, nude but for helmet, with shield over left arm, riding horse galloping right, holding the reins with his left hand and spear with right; to left, Δ; below to right, AP.
Rev. ΤΑΡΑΣ. Phalanthos, nude but for fluttering cloak, riding dolphin left, holding trident in his right hand; to left, Nike, flying right to crown the rider; below, waves. HN Italy 891; Vlasto 523.
R. Rare and very seldom offered. A superb example, perfectly centred, brilliant and prettily toned.
1 commentsLeo10/24/21 at 13:22Jay GT4: You've added some masterpieces lately!
septimius_18.jpg
Septimius Severus Denarius RIC IVa 119aSeptimius Severus AR denarius

2.96g, 16.8mm, 150 degrees, Rome mint, 197-198CE.

Attribution: RIC IVa, 119a. Cohen 641. BMCRE V 255.

O: L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP X, lead laureate right.

R: SALVTI AVGG, Salus seated left, with patera in right hand feeding a snake coiled around an altar.

This was a difficult coin to photograph. In hand, the legends and snake are clearer and I had to choose between a well lit and contrasting portrait or clearer legends with my flash setup.

70 examples in Reka Devnia, Mouchmov P.102.

Ex-Waseem Custy collection.
1 commentsRon C210/24/21 at 13:20Jay GT4: Always liked his portraits
Vlasto_418.jpg
CALABRIA, Taras. Circa 380-340 BC. AR NomosAR. 7.88 g. 23.50 mm.
Obv. Naked youth crowning horse standing left, right foreleg raised; below, A-P.
Rev. Phalanthos riding dolphin left, holding kantharos in extended right hand; below dolphin, X; on dolphin tail, Ω; below, ΤΑΡΑΣ.
HN Italy 875; Vlasto 418/9.
Well centred on a broad flan. Lightly toned with underlying luster. Lovely depiction of Phalantos, with hair loosely waved. Good VF/About EF.
1 commentsLeo10/24/21 at 08:09Laurentius: This is art, beautiful! Cool
D122.jpg
Domitian RIC-122Æ Semis, 4.18g
Rome mint, 81-82 AD
Obv: IMP DOMITIANVS AVG; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Cornucopiae
RIC 122 (R). BMC 481. BMC 517
Acquired from NumisCorner, October 2021.

An undated rare semis from Domitian's first year as Augustus. The early date is presumed based on style and the absence of Germanicus in Domitian's titles. The reverse type is a carry-over from a rare Domitian Caesar issue under Titus. This small issue of undated bronzes, which also includes quadrantes, was likely struck no later than early 82 before the bronze mint was shuttered for a couple of years for the Rome mint's reorganisation.
1 commentsDavid Atherton10/24/21 at 01:54Jay GT4: Lovely piece
Vlasto_449.jpg
CALABRIA, Taras. Circa 365-355 BC. AR Nomos22mm, 7.61g, 12h.
Nude youth on horseback r.; small Θ below. R.
Phalanthos on dolphin l.
Vlasto 449-52; HNItaly 879.
Toned, VF.
1 commentsLeo10/23/21 at 11:48Jay GT4: Another great one
RIC_0020.jpg
RIC 0020 Titus DenariusIMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM
Laureate head of Titus right

TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P
Capricorn left, globe below

Reverse based on the coinage of Augustus

Rome 79 AD

3.06g

RIC 20 (R2)

Ex-Dara Museum E-Auction 2 lot 979

A very rare left facing Titus with an attractive portrait. Some encrustations remain on reverse.
3 commentsJay GT410/23/21 at 04:43orfew: That is a tough one. It took me years to find mine...
Eighth_skekel.jpg
Judaea First Revolt 1/8 Shekel Æלגאלת ציון (Palaeo-Hebrew inscription: "For the redemption of Zion"), omer cup

שנת ארבע (Paleo-Hebrew inscription: "Year four")
lulav bunch flanked by etrogs.

Jerusalem; 69-70 CE

4.83g

Hendin 1369; Meshorer 214

Ex-Savoca Blue Auction 115 lot 820 from the Tareq Hani collection
2 commentsJay GT410/23/21 at 04:42orfew: An amazing coin. So much history
RIC_0020.jpg
RIC 0020 Titus DenariusIMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM
Laureate head of Titus right

TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P
Capricorn left, globe below

Reverse based on the coinage of Augustus

Rome 79 AD

3.06g

RIC 20 (R2)

Ex-Dara Museum E-Auction 2 lot 979

A very rare left facing Titus with an attractive portrait. Some encrustations remain on reverse.
3 commentsJay GT410/23/21 at 03:56David Atherton: Superb rarity!!
Eighth_skekel.jpg
Judaea First Revolt 1/8 Shekel Æלגאלת ציון (Palaeo-Hebrew inscription: "For the redemption of Zion"), omer cup

שנת ארבע (Paleo-Hebrew inscription: "Year four")
lulav bunch flanked by etrogs.

Jerusalem; 69-70 CE

4.83g

Hendin 1369; Meshorer 214

Ex-Savoca Blue Auction 115 lot 820 from the Tareq Hani collection
2 commentsJay GT410/23/21 at 03:55David Atherton: Super addition!
44-5-No_Dot_-_MunzZentrum.jpeg
RRC 44/5 Group 2 "No Dot" Denomination: Denarius
Era: C. 211 BC
Metal: AR
Obverse: Head of Roma r.; splayed visor; X behind; beaded border
Reverse: Dioscuri riding r.; ROMA below in line border with curved left frame; Legend in semi-incuse style

Mint: Rome
Weight: 4.38 g
Reference: RRC 44/5
Provenance: Munz Zentrum 192, Sept 15, 2021, Lot 222

Brinkman/Debernardi Group 2. style of Dot variety but without dot (As more than half of this variety are). Stylistically very close to group 5 and easily misattributed as I did when when I bid on the coin. The distinguishing characteristic is the curved line on the left border around the legend ROMA.

Large flan, well centered, excellent style, and nicely toned. Two minor old scratches on reverse at 12:00, but strong VF.
1 commentsSteve B510/23/21 at 02:57Jay GT4: Excellent coin
ZomboDroid_19102021185932.jpg
Commodus BI Tetradrachm of Alexandria, Egypt. Dated RY 30 = AD 189/90. Obv. MAKOMANTѠCEBEVCEB, laureate head right.
Rev. Eagle standing right on thunderbolt, with wings spread; L Λ in right field. Emmett 2523; Dattari (Savio) 3905.
1 commentsCanaan10/23/21 at 02:04Jay GT4: Nice for the type!
nikopolis_diadumenian_HrHJ282020298_25_10_8corr.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 25. Diadumenian, HrHJ (2020) 8.25.10.08 corr.Diadumenian, AD 217-218
AE 26, 11.02g, 26.13mm, 0°
struck under governor Ststius Longinus
obv. M OPELLI DIADOV - MENIANOC KAI
Bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, bare-headed, r.
rev. VP CTA LONGINOV NIKOPOLITWN PROC ICTR
Hermes, nude, stg. l., bended forwards, with r. foot on rock, r. arm set on knee, l. hand with chlamys on back,
holding in extended r. hand lowered kerykeion
ref. a) not in AMNG:
cf. AMNG I/1, 1849 (for the type only)
b) Varbanov 3735 corr. (same dies, but writes MENIANOC K)
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2020) No. 8.25.10.8 corr. (same dies, but writes MENIANOC K)
VF, glossy black patina
Pedigree:
ex coll. Prof. Peter Robert Franke

Interesting depiction of the rock!
1 commentsJochen10/22/21 at 18:02Jay GT4: Very cool
volgatet.jpeg
Vologases I (51 - 88 A.D.)AR Tetradrachm
O: Bare-headed bust facing, head left with pointed beard; beaded border.
R: [ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ] ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩ[Ν ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ] ΕΥΕΡΓΕ[ΤΟΥ] ΔΙΚΑΙΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟ[ΥΣ ΦΙΛΕ]ΛΛΗΝ[ΟΣ]; date GXT (51/2 A.D.)between heads.
Seleucia Mint
Shore 370 Sellwood 68.4-8

Reverse Die Shift
1 commentsMat10/22/21 at 17:09Jay GT4: Nice eastern tet
RIC_0020.jpg
RIC 0020 Titus DenariusIMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM
Laureate head of Titus right

TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P
Capricorn left, globe below

Reverse based on the coinage of Augustus

Rome 79 AD

3.06g

RIC 20 (R2)

Ex-Dara Museum E-Auction 2 lot 979

A very rare left facing Titus with an attractive portrait. Some encrustations remain on reverse.
3 commentsJay GT410/22/21 at 05:58quadrans: Nice find...Smile
Aurelian_tripolis.JPG
Aurelian SOLI INVICTO from Tripolis...double struckAurelian
A.D. 270- 275
IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG; radiate & cuirassed bust left.
SOLI INVICTO•; Sol stg. left, right hand raised, left holding globe, at foot captive; ✶ in left field.
In ex. KA
RIC Vi Tripolis 390

double struck
1 commentsVictor C10/22/21 at 00:52Jay GT4: Great double strike
V796.jpg
Vespasian RIC-796AR Quinarius, 1.53g
Rome mint, 75(?) AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
RIC 796 (R). BMC -. RSC 614 var. BNC -.
Acquired from NumisCorner, October 2021.

Vespasian's moneyer's struck a great issue of undated quinarii in 75, possibly in conjunction with the opening of his Temple of Peace. Two standard Victory types (seated and advancing) were employed along with various variant legend spellings and orientations. The variations are: obverse legend - VESPASIANVS or less commonly VESPASIAN; reverse legend - AVGVSTI or less commonly AVGVST. The reverse legend can also either be oriented from low r. or high l. This coin is considered one of the less common variants with VESPASIAN in the obverse legend and AVGVSTI in the reverse, oriented from low r. All quinarii struck during the Flavian era are exceedingly rare compared to the denarii. Vespasian's largest issue of quinarii is this undated issue which most likely dates to 75. The quinarii struck before 75 have AVGVSTI in the reverse legend, while those struck after 75 use the shorter AVGVST. This undated issue employs both forms and therefore fits neatly with a 75 production date. The portrait is quite stylish for such a small flan.
1 commentsDavid Atherton10/21/21 at 20:43Jay GT4: Nice one
THRACE2C_Mesambria__4th_century_BC__Diobol_2810_5mm2C_128_g29.JPG
THRACE, Mesambria. 4th century BC. AR Diobol THRACE, Mesambria. 4th century BC. AR Diobol (10.5mm, 128 g). Helmet facing / Ethnic within spokes of wheel; rays around. Karayotov I 37–94; HGC 3, 1560. Toned, slight die wear. Good VF.4 commentsMark R110/21/21 at 16:07Mark R1: Thank you Joe Wink
elagabalus_3.jpg
Elagabalus Antoninianus, RIC IVb 129Elagabalus AR Antoninianus

5.38g, 22.0mm, 180 degrees, Rome mint, 218-222 CE.

Attribution: RIC IVb 129, e obverse. Cohen 243.

O: IMP ANTONINVS AVG, Radiate and draped bust right

R: PROVID DEORVM, Providentia standing left, legs crossed and leaning on column, holding wand over globe set on ground and cornucopiae.

13 examples in Reka Devnia, Mouchmov P.125.

Ex-Artemide Kunstauctionen eLive auction 19, lot 545, 26 Sept 2021.
1 commentsRon C210/21/21 at 06:49quadrans: Nice one
THRACE2C_Mesambria__4th_century_BC__Diobol_2810_5mm2C_128_g29.JPG
THRACE, Mesambria. 4th century BC. AR Diobol THRACE, Mesambria. 4th century BC. AR Diobol (10.5mm, 128 g). Helmet facing / Ethnic within spokes of wheel; rays around. Karayotov I 37–94; HGC 3, 1560. Toned, slight die wear. Good VF.4 commentsMark R110/21/21 at 06:46quadrans: Great coin Smile, and details,
THRACE2C_Mesambria__4th_century_BC__Diobol_2810_5mm2C_128_g29.JPG
THRACE, Mesambria. 4th century BC. AR Diobol THRACE, Mesambria. 4th century BC. AR Diobol (10.5mm, 128 g). Helmet facing / Ethnic within spokes of wheel; rays around. Karayotov I 37–94; HGC 3, 1560. Toned, slight die wear. Good VF.4 commentsMark R110/20/21 at 23:53Mark R1: Thanks Jay.
THRACE2C_Mesambria__4th_century_BC__Diobol_2810_5mm2C_128_g29.JPG
THRACE, Mesambria. 4th century BC. AR Diobol THRACE, Mesambria. 4th century BC. AR Diobol (10.5mm, 128 g). Helmet facing / Ethnic within spokes of wheel; rays around. Karayotov I 37–94; HGC 3, 1560. Toned, slight die wear. Good VF.4 commentsMark R110/20/21 at 23:39Jay GT4: Nice Corinthian helmet
1682Hadrian_RIC_373A.jpg
0373A Hadrian Denarius Roma 119-23 AD LibertasReference.
RIC 373A.; Strack 75; RIC II, 128; BMC 290; C. 907.

Bust C2

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN-HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate, draped, bust viewed from back

Rev. P M TR P COS-III LIB | PVB in field
Libertas standing left, holding pileus and vindicta

3.36 gr
20 mm
6h
2 commentsokidoki10/20/21 at 16:55quadrans: Great piece .
1682Hadrian_RIC_373A.jpg
0373A Hadrian Denarius Roma 119-23 AD LibertasReference.
RIC 373A.; Strack 75; RIC II, 128; BMC 290; C. 907.

Bust C2

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN-HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate, draped, bust viewed from back

Rev. P M TR P COS-III LIB | PVB in field
Libertas standing left, holding pileus and vindicta

3.36 gr
20 mm
6h
2 commentsokidoki10/20/21 at 13:20Mat: Handsome addition
Septimius_69.jpg
Septimius Severus Denarius RIC IVa 510aSeptimius Severus AR denarius

3.23g, 18.3mm, 0 degrees, Rome or Laodicea mint, 198-202 CE

Attribution: RIC IVa 510a. Cohen 342. BMCRE V 669.

O: L SEPT SEV AVG IMP XI PART MAX, laureate head right.

R: MONETA AVGG, Moneta seated left, holding scales and cornucopiae.

No examples of Cohen 342, but identical? Cohen 345 had 48 examples in Reka Devnia, Mouchmov P.99

Ex-CJ Martin Coins.
2 commentsRon C210/20/21 at 10:20quadrans: Interesting piece..
Piso-Frugi.jpg
012. C. Calpurnius Piso L.f. Frugi.Denarius (3.93 gm), ca 67-59 BC, Rome mint.

Obverse: Die O-229. Head of Apollo, in high relief, facing right;
his hair long and in ringlets, bound with taenia (fillet).
Sequence mark: IE (retrograde E), with bar above.

Reverse: Die R-2045. Horseman galloping to right; no hat; carrying palm branch.
Sequence mark below: dolphin facing right.
Legend: C PISO . L . F FRV

In Hersh’s die study of this issue, these 2 dies come together in #219.
Crawford #3/8.
Sydenham #851.
Sear #348.

2 commentsCallimachus10/20/21 at 06:38quadrans: wow, great coin, Shocked
1310.jpg
antiochgalatia001_3Elagabalus
Antioch, Pisidia

Obv: IMP CA M AVR ANTONI AV, Laureate head right.
Rev: ANT-IOCH-ENI COL CAES, Tyche standing left holding branch and cornucopia.
22 mm, 4.58 gms

RPC Online 6566 (as either Elagabalus or Caracalla)
1 commentsCharles M10/20/21 at 01:37Christiane M: Just checked, RPC Online 6566 doesn't exist a...
1698.jpg
antiochgalatia001_33Elagabalus
Antioch, Pisidia

Obv: IMP C M AVR A - NTONI AV, Laureate head right.
Rev: ANT-IOCH -EN COL CA, Tyche standing left holding branch and cornucopia.
23 mm, 6.20 gms

RPC Online 6566 (as either Elagabalus or Caracalla)
1 commentsCharles M10/20/21 at 01:35Christiane M: Just checked, RPC Online 6566 doesn't exist a...
_britannicus_BCC.jpg
BCC rgp4 Britannicus Caesarea PaneasRoman Provincial
Britannicus 50-54 CE
Son of Claudius
Obv:BRITANNICVS.AVG.F.
bare headed bust of child
Rev:S C within garland/wreath
15mm. approx. 4.25g.
Hendin GBC III 569
Exceedingly Rare
2 commentsv-drome10/19/21 at 17:44v-drome: Not for a thousand chilblainies!
GordianusPius-AE18-DELTUM-Varb_2891.jpg
004 - Gordianus III - AE18 - DEUTLUM - THRACIA - Varbanov Vol.II/2891A) GORDIANVS IMP AVG
Laureated, cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield
R) CF PD
Head of a bull en face

Weightt: 3,88g; Size: 18mm
References: Varbanov Vulume II page: 237/2891; Jurukova:312; plate:27
Mint: Deultum; Province: Thracia
1 commentsGerhard M10/19/21 at 17:25v-drome: interesting, neat coin!
Piso-Frugi.jpg
012. C. Calpurnius Piso L.f. Frugi.Denarius (3.93 gm), ca 67-59 BC, Rome mint.

Obverse: Die O-229. Head of Apollo, in high relief, facing right;
his hair long and in ringlets, bound with taenia (fillet).
Sequence mark: IE (retrograde E), with bar above.

Reverse: Die R-2045. Horseman galloping to right; no hat; carrying palm branch.
Sequence mark below: dolphin facing right.
Legend: C PISO . L . F FRV

In Hersh’s die study of this issue, these 2 dies come together in #219.
Crawford #3/8.
Sydenham #851.
Sear #348.

2 commentsCallimachus10/17/21 at 22:13Jay GT4: Beautiful coin
Constantine_Arles_Sol.JPG
Constantine I SOLI INVICTO COMITI from Arles...Not in RICConstantine I
A.D. 317- 318
20x21mm 3.9g
IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG; laureate and trabeated bust left, holding eagle tipped sceptre in right hand.
SOLI INVICTO COMITI; Sol rad., raising r. hand, globe in l.; stg. l., chlamys across l. shoulder; in left field C, in right S.
In ex. SARL
RIC VII Arles --


Unlisted bust type
3 commentsVictor C10/17/21 at 14:38Victor C: Thanks, but I was aware of Lech's page
Septimius_69.jpg
Septimius Severus Denarius RIC IVa 510aSeptimius Severus AR denarius

3.23g, 18.3mm, 0 degrees, Rome or Laodicea mint, 198-202 CE

Attribution: RIC IVa 510a. Cohen 342. BMCRE V 669.

O: L SEPT SEV AVG IMP XI PART MAX, laureate head right.

R: MONETA AVGG, Moneta seated left, holding scales and cornucopiae.

No examples of Cohen 342, but identical? Cohen 345 had 48 examples in Reka Devnia, Mouchmov P.99

Ex-CJ Martin Coins.
2 commentsRon C210/17/21 at 13:14Anaximander: Wonderful example.
Constantine_Arles_Sol.JPG
Constantine I SOLI INVICTO COMITI from Arles...Not in RICConstantine I
A.D. 317- 318
20x21mm 3.9g
IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG; laureate and trabeated bust left, holding eagle tipped sceptre in right hand.
SOLI INVICTO COMITI; Sol rad., raising r. hand, globe in l.; stg. l., chlamys across l. shoulder; in left field C, in right S.
In ex. SARL
RIC VII Arles --


Unlisted bust type
3 commentsVictor C10/17/21 at 05:50Pekka K: "https://www.forumancientcoins.com/notinric/7arl-1...
Constantine_Arles_Sol.JPG
Constantine I SOLI INVICTO COMITI from Arles...Not in RICConstantine I
A.D. 317- 318
20x21mm 3.9g
IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG; laureate and trabeated bust left, holding eagle tipped sceptre in right hand.
SOLI INVICTO COMITI; Sol rad., raising r. hand, globe in l.; stg. l., chlamys across l. shoulder; in left field C, in right S.
In ex. SARL
RIC VII Arles --


Unlisted bust type
3 commentsVictor C10/16/21 at 18:06gb29400: Laughing Very interesting
09111_45.jpg
Commodus - AE Sestertius - LIBERALITAS COMMODUS. 177-192 AD.
Æ Sestertius, Rome, 177 AD.
30.5 mm, 26.36 g
IMP CAES L AVREL COMMODVS GERM SARM, Laureate head right
R/ TR P II COS/ LIBERALITAS / AVG S-C
Marcus Aurelius and Commodus seated left on platform, officer beside them; Liberalitas standing left before them, holding abacus and cornucopiae; on steps, citizen standing right, holding out fold of toga.
RIC III 1558 (Marcus Aurelius)
1 commentsgb2940010/16/21 at 16:58okidoki: very nice
RPC1683.jpg
RPC-1683-Domitian as CaesarÆ19, 4.22g
Caesarea, Cappadocia mint, 77-78 AD
Obv: ΔΟΜΙΤΙΑΝΟϹ ΚΑΙ ϹƐΒΑϹΤΟϹ; Head of Domitian, laureate, r.
Rev: ΚΑΙϹΑ/ΡƐΙΑϹ, ƐΤ Ι (in exergue); Mount Argaeus surmounted by crescent or wreath
RPC 1683 (6 spec.).
Acquired from Romae Aeternae Numismatics, October 2021.

A somewhat rare provincial bronze of Domitian Caesar struck under Vespasian at Caeserea, Cappadocia depicting the famous Mount Argaeus. Dated year 10 under the legat M Hirrius Fronto Neratius Pansa. Strabo described the mountain as such: It's 'the highest of mountains whose peak is constantly covered with snow ...given good visibility, anyone who climbs this mountain - and not many do- are supposed to see both seas, the Pontus and the Issikos'.

The above reverse perhaps does not relay the grandeur of the actual peak, possibly being a representation of a cult picture, or agalma, of the mountain - but it's a fascinating reverse type nonetheless!
1 commentsDavid Atherton10/16/21 at 03:36Jay GT4: Interesting. Used to seeing these as drachms
salserp.jpg
Saloninus (258 - 260 A.D.)Egypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm
O: PO LI KOR CA VALERIANOC, Bareheaded, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
R:  Alexandria standing left, wearing turreted crown, holding bust of Sarapis and scepter; L Z (Year 7) across field.
Alexandria Mint (259 - 260 A.D.)
10.65g
23mm
Köln 3007; Dattari (Savio) 5353 var. (obv. legend); K&G 93.9; Emmett 3774.7, Milne 4030

Published on Wildwinds!
2 commentsMat10/13/21 at 13:49*Alex: Nice. I like it.
salserp.jpg
Saloninus (258 - 260 A.D.)Egypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm
O: PO LI KOR CA VALERIANOC, Bareheaded, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
R:  Alexandria standing left, wearing turreted crown, holding bust of Sarapis and scepter; L Z (Year 7) across field.
Alexandria Mint (259 - 260 A.D.)
10.65g
23mm
Köln 3007; Dattari (Savio) 5353 var. (obv. legend); K&G 93.9; Emmett 3774.7, Milne 4030

Published on Wildwinds!
2 commentsMat10/12/21 at 15:23Jay GT4: Interesting portrait
FaustinaJr.jpg
Faustina Jr Denarius. VenusObv: FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust right, no hair accessories around head.
Rev: VENVS, Venus standing left with apple and dolphin-entwined rudder.
1 commentsancientone10/12/21 at 13:16Jay GT4: Beauty
AngloDane_Eltangerht_SCBC1027A_.jpg
Viking Northumbria, Alfred the Great (Imitative). 947-949. Anglo-Dane. Viking Northumbria, Alfred the Great (Imitative). 947-949. AR Penny (1.24 gm). Imitating an issue of Alfred the Great. Circumscription cross, "Eltangerht" ✠EΓꓕ∵A●NGERHT. / Reinard, moneyer. ∴ RERN / ✠✠✠ / ART ∵ all enclosed in a solid line inside beaded border (Horizontal two-line type, HT1E). nVF. CNG Coin Shop #498858. Blunt CTCE Ch. 14 Group VIII, e (this coin), cf plate 27 #20; MEC 8 2608; North 548/1; SCBI 34 (BM) 1264-5 (same dies); Spink SCBC 1027A. One of two in private hands. Ex Nicholas Rhodes Coll. Poss. ex-Lord Grantley Coll. (Part III, Glendining, 22 March 1944), #1079 (part of).1 commentsAnaximander10/11/21 at 20:49St. George Collection: Great coin, extremely rare!
B8564BD3-8223-43F4-AEC3-97FEDFBB268D.jpeg
Hadrian, 117-138 Denarius circa 126-127, AR 20mm., 2.82g. Laureate bust r. Rev. Crescent; above, star and below, globe. C 460. RIC 8652 commentspaul188810/11/21 at 15:00okidoki: great looks
marius_1.jpg
Marius Antoninianus RIC Vb 10Marius AR (BI) Antoninianus

2.10g, 18.0mm, 180 degrees, Cologne (Colonia Agrippinensis) mint, 269 CE.

Attribution: RIC Vb 10. Cohen 13.

O: IMP C MARIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right.

R: SAEC FELICITAS, Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus & cornucopiae.

Ex-Incitatus Coins
2 commentsRon C210/11/21 at 10:37Anaximander: Nice addition.
Philip_Wolf_sestertius.jpg
Philip I AD 244-249 Æ Sestertius (27x31mm, 15.79 g.)
Secular Games issue.
Rome mint, struck AD 249.
Obv. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
Rev. SAECVLARES AVGG, she-wolf standing left, head right, suckling the twins Romulus and Remus.
RIC IV 159

Continuing the tradition of Claudius and Antoninus Pius before him, the celebration of the Secular Games at the end of every century since the founding of Rome culminated during the reign of Philip I, as the city celebrated her 1,000th anniversary in AD 248. The legends on these issues almost exclusively read Saeculares Augg, and feature a similar iconography from previous games, such as the she-wolf suckling the twins, the various wild beasts paraded through the amphitheater, and a cippus inscribed for the preservation of the memory of these events.
2 commentspaul188810/10/21 at 20:58FlaviusDomitianus: Lovely coin, congrats!
Constantine_Rome_178.JPG
Constantine I VIRTVS AVGG campgate from RomeConstantine I
A.D. 318- 319
19mm 3.1g
CON-STANTI-NVS AVG; cuirassed and helmeted bust left, spear pointing forward and shield on left arm.
VIRTVS AVGG; camp gate with closed doors and three turrets, across fields P-R
In ex. RP
RIC VII Rome 178

arch over the doorway and interesting circles on the turrets
1 commentsVictor C10/09/21 at 22:12okidoki: great looks
RPC1606.jpg
RPC-1606-TitusÆ20, 6.57g
Lystra, Lycaonia mint, 79-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAE AVG VESPA; Head of Titus, laureate, l.
Rev: COL I(V)L LVS; Helmeted bust of Athena, l., two spears over shoulder
RPC 1606 (2 spec.).
Acquired from Forvm, September 2021.

The colony of Lystra was located south east of lake Beysehir in Galatia-Cappadocia. According to RPC II, it was remote and located far from the major trading routes and never gained any importance. It struck a small issue under Augustus and later under Titus. The coinage was for local circulation, which would explain its extreme rarity today.
1 commentsDavid Atherton10/09/21 at 22:07Jay GT4: Nice pick up!
Licinius_follis.jpeg
Licinius II follisLicinius Follis, struck AD 321-324 at Alexandria mint.
Obv. D N VAL LICIN LICINIVS NOB C, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, holding spear over shoulder and with shield on left arm.
Rev. IOVI CONSERVATORI / SMALA (in exergue), Jupiter standing left holding Victory and scepter, eagle and captive at feet, XIIΓ in right field.
20 mm, 3,43 gr.
RIC 30
1 commentsMarsman10/09/21 at 06:34Pharsalos: Great dies both sides!
RE_FaustinaJunior_RIC_3(M_Aurelius)686_.jpg
Faustina Junior, Augustua and wife of Marcus Aurelius. Hilaritas. Denarius.Roman Empire. Faustina Junior, Augustua and wife of Marcus Aurelius. †175 AD. AR Denarius (3.37 gm) of Rome, 161-175 AD. Draped bust of Faustina, r. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA. / Hilaritas stdg l., holding cornucopiae and palm frond. HILARITAS. EF. RIC III (M. Aurelius) #686; BMCRE (same) 100; Cohen=RSC II #111; MIR 15; SRCV II #5254.1 commentsAnaximander10/09/21 at 06:26Pharsalos: Fantastic portrait, great reverse detail, and beau...
Jesus_Vico_NIKE_BOTH.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm c 140/39 BC Obs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet-No Pegassos
16.60 gm 31 mm
Thompson catalogue : Obs 278 : REV not in plates?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
Upon which Amphora mark : M
Below control mark : ΕΜΦ
2 magistrates : ΚΤΗΣΙ ΕΥΜΑ
RF symbol : Nike presenting Wreath
All within a surrounding olive wreath

1 commentscicerokid10/06/21 at 23:37Jay GT4: Another worthy addition
Lucius.png
Lucius PomponiusGens Pomponia. Lucius Pomponius Cneo Filius. 118 BC, serrated denarius.
Obv. L POMPONI CN F (Lucii Pomponi CNAEII Filii) Head of Rome to the right, behind X.
Rev. L LIC CN DOM (Lucio Licinio Cnaeo Domizio). Naked Gallic warrior (king Bituitus?) in biga galloping right; holding shield, carnyx and reins in left hand and hurling spear with right hand.
20 mm, 3,87 gr.
Cr. 282/4

1 commentsMarsman10/06/21 at 23:36Jay GT4: Woah! Nice piece
comdoses.jpg
Commodus (177 - 192 A.D.)Æ Sestertius 
O: L AEL AVREL COMM AVG P FEL, Laureate head right.
R: SAL GEN HVM COS VI PP SC Salus standing left, holding serpent-entwined scepter and extending hand to raise person kneeling right. 
Rome Mint 191 A.D.
24.44g
33mm
RIC III 600; MIR 18, 829-6/30; Banti 370 BMCRE 682 (Die Match)

Rare

Published on Wildwinds!
2 commentsMat10/06/21 at 15:25quadrans: Nice 👍😉
Gallienus_antoninianus.jpeg
Gallienus antoninianusGallienus antoninianus, struck 267 - 268 AD at Rome mint.
Obv. GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right.
Rev. NEPTVNO CONS AVG / N , Hippocamp right.
1,95 g, 20 mm.
RIC 245
1 commentsMarsman10/06/21 at 12:57laney: Nice Hippocamp!
V661var.jpg
00 Domitian as Caesar RIC 661 var. [Vespasian]Æ Dupondius, 10.98g
Rome mint, 73-74 AD
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIAN COS II; Head of Domitian, laureate, draped, bearded, l.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., leaning on column, with caduceus and branch
RIC 661 var. BMC -. BNC -.
Acquired from eBay, September 2021.

The propaganda value of Pax for the Flavian dynasty after the Civil War, the revolt of Civilis, and the Jewish War cannot be overestimated. In her various guises she is one of the most popular types on Vespasian's coinage and shows up quite frequently during the reign on the coins struck for both himself and his sons. This early dupondius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Vespasian shows Pax leaning on a column, which likely copies a well known cult image of the goddess. Domitian's dupondii in these initial issues can be distinguished from the asses by their metal and draped busts. RIC records a unique specimen of the Pax type with AVGVSTI as RIC 661 but does not list this variant with AVGVST. It is also unlisted in the Addenda and Corrigenda. So, apparently unpublished and unique!
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/04/21 at 21:48Jay GT4: Handsome portrait
comdoses.jpg
Commodus (177 - 192 A.D.)Æ Sestertius 
O: L AEL AVREL COMM AVG P FEL, Laureate head right.
R: SAL GEN HVM COS VI PP SC Salus standing left, holding serpent-entwined scepter and extending hand to raise person kneeling right. 
Rome Mint 191 A.D.
24.44g
33mm
RIC III 600; MIR 18, 829-6/30; Banti 370 BMCRE 682 (Die Match)

Rare

Published on Wildwinds!
2 commentsMat10/04/21 at 21:26Jay GT4: Very cool
V661var.jpg
00 Domitian as Caesar RIC 661 var. [Vespasian]Æ Dupondius, 10.98g
Rome mint, 73-74 AD
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIAN COS II; Head of Domitian, laureate, draped, bearded, l.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., leaning on column, with caduceus and branch
RIC 661 var. BMC -. BNC -.
Acquired from eBay, September 2021.

The propaganda value of Pax for the Flavian dynasty after the Civil War, the revolt of Civilis, and the Jewish War cannot be overestimated. In her various guises she is one of the most popular types on Vespasian's coinage and shows up quite frequently during the reign on the coins struck for both himself and his sons. This early dupondius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Vespasian shows Pax leaning on a column, which likely copies a well known cult image of the goddess. Domitian's dupondii in these initial issues can be distinguished from the asses by their metal and draped busts. RIC records a unique specimen of the Pax type with AVGVSTI as RIC 661 but does not list this variant with AVGVST. It is also unlisted in the Addenda and Corrigenda. So, apparently unpublished and unique!
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/04/21 at 20:23Mat: Great find, congrats
Probus_Antioch920.jpg
Probus CLEMENTIA TEMP from Antioch...Revolt of SaturninusProbus
A.D. 276- 282
Ӕ Antoninianus
21mm 4.2g
IMP C M AVR PROBVS P F AVG; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
CLEMENTIA TEMP; Emperor standing right, holding scepter with eagle, receiving globe from Jupiter; Γ • in center.
In ex. XXI
RIC Vii Antioch 920


Though attributed to Antioch in RIC, this coin has more recently been attributed, mainly based on style, to an unknown mint, struck A.D. 280- 281, when the governor of Syria, Saturninus, revolted against Probus.

See the article by Estiot


1 commentsVictor C10/04/21 at 17:37quadrans: Great piece ..I like it..Smile
V661var.jpg
00 Domitian as Caesar RIC 661 var. [Vespasian]Æ Dupondius, 10.98g
Rome mint, 73-74 AD
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIAN COS II; Head of Domitian, laureate, draped, bearded, l.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., leaning on column, with caduceus and branch
RIC 661 var. BMC -. BNC -.
Acquired from eBay, September 2021.

The propaganda value of Pax for the Flavian dynasty after the Civil War, the revolt of Civilis, and the Jewish War cannot be overestimated. In her various guises she is one of the most popular types on Vespasian's coinage and shows up quite frequently during the reign on the coins struck for both himself and his sons. This early dupondius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Vespasian shows Pax leaning on a column, which likely copies a well known cult image of the goddess. Domitian's dupondii in these initial issues can be distinguished from the asses by their metal and draped busts. RIC records a unique specimen of the Pax type with AVGVSTI as RIC 661 but does not list this variant with AVGVST. It is also unlisted in the Addenda and Corrigenda. So, apparently unpublished and unique!
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/04/21 at 14:24orfew: Wow. That is a great catch. I love the Nero-like p...
MACEDONIA2C_ARGILOS.JPG
Macedonia, Argilos, Time of Alexander I, AR Hemiobol, struck 470 - 460 BC at Argilos in MacedoniaObverse: No legend. Forepart of Pegasos facing left.
Reverse: No legend. Quadripartite granulated incuse square.
Diameter: 8.78mm | Weight: 0.20gms | Die Axis: Uncertain
Liampi 118 | SNG - | GCV -
Rare

Argilos was a city of ancient Macedonia founded by a colony of Greeks from Andros. Although little information is known about the city until about 480 BC, the literary tradition dates the foundation to around 655/654 BC which makes Argilos the earliest Greek colony on the Thracian coast. It appears from Herodotus to have been a little to the right of the route the army of Xerxes I took during its invasion of Greece in 480 BC in the Greco-Persian Wars. Its territory must have extended as far as the right bank of the Strymona, since the mountain of Kerdylion belonged to the city.
Argilos benefited from the trading activities along the Strymona and probably also from the gold mines of the Pangeion. Ancient authors rarely mention the site, but nevertheless shed some light on the important periods of its history. In the last quarter of the 6th century BC, Argilos founded two colonies, Tragilos, in the Thracian heartland, and Kerdilion, a few kilometers to the east of the city.
Alexander I was the ruler of the ancient kingdom of Macedonia from c.498 BC until his death in 454 BC. Alexander came to the throne during the era of the kingdom's vassalage to Persia, dating back to the time of his father, Amyntas I. Although Macedonia retained a broad scope of autonomy, in 492 BC it was made a fully subordinate part of the Persian Empire. Alexander I acted as a representative of the Persian governor Mardonius during peace negotiations after the Persian defeat at the Battle of Salamis in 480 BC. From the time of Mardonius' conquest of Macedonia, Herodotus disparagingly refers to Alexander I as “hyparchos”, meaning viceroy. However, despite his cooperation with Persia, Alexander frequently gave supplies and advice to the Greek city states, and warned them of the Persian plans before the Battle of Plataea in 479 BC. After their defeat at Plataea, when the Persian army under the command of Artabazus tried to retreat all the way back to Asia Minor, most of the 43,000 survivors of the battle were attacked and killed by the forces of Alexander at the estuary of the Strymona river.
Alexander regained Macedonian independence after the end of the Persian Wars and was given the title "philhellene" by the Athenians, a title used for Greek patriots.
After the Persian defeat, Argilos became a member of the first Athenian confederation but the foundation of Amphipolis in 437 BC, which took control of the trade along the Strymona, brought an end to this. Thucydides tells us that some Argilians took part in this foundation but that the relations between the two cities quickly deteriorated and, during the Peloponnesian war, the Argilians joined with the Spartan general Brasidas to attack Amphipolis. An inscription from the temple of Asklepios in Epidauros attests that Argilos was an independent city during the 4th century.
Like other colonies in the area, Argilos was conquered by the Macedonian king Philip II in 357 B.C. Historians believe that the city was then abandoned and, though excavations have brought to light an important agricultural settlement on the acropolis dated to the years 350-200 BC, no Roman or Byzantine ruins have been uncovered there.
4 comments*Alex10/04/21 at 04:01Enodia: Nice little coin. Don't sneeze!
MACEDONIA2C_ARGILOS.JPG
Macedonia, Argilos, Time of Alexander I, AR Hemiobol, struck 470 - 460 BC at Argilos in MacedoniaObverse: No legend. Forepart of Pegasos facing left.
Reverse: No legend. Quadripartite granulated incuse square.
Diameter: 8.78mm | Weight: 0.20gms | Die Axis: Uncertain
Liampi 118 | SNG - | GCV -
Rare

Argilos was a city of ancient Macedonia founded by a colony of Greeks from Andros. Although little information is known about the city until about 480 BC, the literary tradition dates the foundation to around 655/654 BC which makes Argilos the earliest Greek colony on the Thracian coast. It appears from Herodotus to have been a little to the right of the route the army of Xerxes I took during its invasion of Greece in 480 BC in the Greco-Persian Wars. Its territory must have extended as far as the right bank of the Strymona, since the mountain of Kerdylion belonged to the city.
Argilos benefited from the trading activities along the Strymona and probably also from the gold mines of the Pangeion. Ancient authors rarely mention the site, but nevertheless shed some light on the important periods of its history. In the last quarter of the 6th century BC, Argilos founded two colonies, Tragilos, in the Thracian heartland, and Kerdilion, a few kilometers to the east of the city.
Alexander I was the ruler of the ancient kingdom of Macedonia from c.498 BC until his death in 454 BC. Alexander came to the throne during the era of the kingdom's vassalage to Persia, dating back to the time of his father, Amyntas I. Although Macedonia retained a broad scope of autonomy, in 492 BC it was made a fully subordinate part of the Persian Empire. Alexander I acted as a representative of the Persian governor Mardonius during peace negotiations after the Persian defeat at the Battle of Salamis in 480 BC. From the time of Mardonius' conquest of Macedonia, Herodotus disparagingly refers to Alexander I as “hyparchos”, meaning viceroy. However, despite his cooperation with Persia, Alexander frequently gave supplies and advice to the Greek city states, and warned them of the Persian plans before the Battle of Plataea in 479 BC. After their defeat at Plataea, when the Persian army under the command of Artabazus tried to retreat all the way back to Asia Minor, most of the 43,000 survivors of the battle were attacked and killed by the forces of Alexander at the estuary of the Strymona river.
Alexander regained Macedonian independence after the end of the Persian Wars and was given the title "philhellene" by the Athenians, a title used for Greek patriots.
After the Persian defeat, Argilos became a member of the first Athenian confederation but the foundation of Amphipolis in 437 BC, which took control of the trade along the Strymona, brought an end to this. Thucydides tells us that some Argilians took part in this foundation but that the relations between the two cities quickly deteriorated and, during the Peloponnesian war, the Argilians joined with the Spartan general Brasidas to attack Amphipolis. An inscription from the temple of Asklepios in Epidauros attests that Argilos was an independent city during the 4th century.
Like other colonies in the area, Argilos was conquered by the Macedonian king Philip II in 357 B.C. Historians believe that the city was then abandoned and, though excavations have brought to light an important agricultural settlement on the acropolis dated to the years 350-200 BC, no Roman or Byzantine ruins have been uncovered there.
4 comments*Alex10/03/21 at 21:00Tracy Aiello: Beautiful obv.
MACEDONIA2C_ARGILOS.JPG
Macedonia, Argilos, Time of Alexander I, AR Hemiobol, struck 470 - 460 BC at Argilos in MacedoniaObverse: No legend. Forepart of Pegasos facing left.
Reverse: No legend. Quadripartite granulated incuse square.
Diameter: 8.78mm | Weight: 0.20gms | Die Axis: Uncertain
Liampi 118 | SNG - | GCV -
Rare

Argilos was a city of ancient Macedonia founded by a colony of Greeks from Andros. Although little information is known about the city until about 480 BC, the literary tradition dates the foundation to around 655/654 BC which makes Argilos the earliest Greek colony on the Thracian coast. It appears from Herodotus to have been a little to the right of the route the army of Xerxes I took during its invasion of Greece in 480 BC in the Greco-Persian Wars. Its territory must have extended as far as the right bank of the Strymona, since the mountain of Kerdylion belonged to the city.
Argilos benefited from the trading activities along the Strymona and probably also from the gold mines of the Pangeion. Ancient authors rarely mention the site, but nevertheless shed some light on the important periods of its history. In the last quarter of the 6th century BC, Argilos founded two colonies, Tragilos, in the Thracian heartland, and Kerdilion, a few kilometers to the east of the city.
Alexander I was the ruler of the ancient kingdom of Macedonia from c.498 BC until his death in 454 BC. Alexander came to the throne during the era of the kingdom's vassalage to Persia, dating back to the time of his father, Amyntas I. Although Macedonia retained a broad scope of autonomy, in 492 BC it was made a fully subordinate part of the Persian Empire. Alexander I acted as a representative of the Persian governor Mardonius during peace negotiations after the Persian defeat at the Battle of Salamis in 480 BC. From the time of Mardonius' conquest of Macedonia, Herodotus disparagingly refers to Alexander I as “hyparchos”, meaning viceroy. However, despite his cooperation with Persia, Alexander frequently gave supplies and advice to the Greek city states, and warned them of the Persian plans before the Battle of Plataea in 479 BC. After their defeat at Plataea, when the Persian army under the command of Artabazus tried to retreat all the way back to Asia Minor, most of the 43,000 survivors of the battle were attacked and killed by the forces of Alexander at the estuary of the Strymona river.
Alexander regained Macedonian independence after the end of the Persian Wars and was given the title "philhellene" by the Athenians, a title used for Greek patriots.
After the Persian defeat, Argilos became a member of the first Athenian confederation but the foundation of Amphipolis in 437 BC, which took control of the trade along the Strymona, brought an end to this. Thucydides tells us that some Argilians took part in this foundation but that the relations between the two cities quickly deteriorated and, during the Peloponnesian war, the Argilians joined with the Spartan general Brasidas to attack Amphipolis. An inscription from the temple of Asklepios in Epidauros attests that Argilos was an independent city during the 4th century.
Like other colonies in the area, Argilos was conquered by the Macedonian king Philip II in 357 B.C. Historians believe that the city was then abandoned and, though excavations have brought to light an important agricultural settlement on the acropolis dated to the years 350-200 BC, no Roman or Byzantine ruins have been uncovered there.
4 comments*Alex10/03/21 at 19:42quadrans: Pretty
MACEDONIA2C_ARGILOS.JPG
Macedonia, Argilos, Time of Alexander I, AR Hemiobol, struck 470 - 460 BC at Argilos in MacedoniaObverse: No legend. Forepart of Pegasos facing left.
Reverse: No legend. Quadripartite granulated incuse square.
Diameter: 8.78mm | Weight: 0.20gms | Die Axis: Uncertain
Liampi 118 | SNG - | GCV -
Rare

Argilos was a city of ancient Macedonia founded by a colony of Greeks from Andros. Although little information is known about the city until about 480 BC, the literary tradition dates the foundation to around 655/654 BC which makes Argilos the earliest Greek colony on the Thracian coast. It appears from Herodotus to have been a little to the right of the route the army of Xerxes I took during its invasion of Greece in 480 BC in the Greco-Persian Wars. Its territory must have extended as far as the right bank of the Strymona, since the mountain of Kerdylion belonged to the city.
Argilos benefited from the trading activities along the Strymona and probably also from the gold mines of the Pangeion. Ancient authors rarely mention the site, but nevertheless shed some light on the important periods of its history. In the last quarter of the 6th century BC, Argilos founded two colonies, Tragilos, in the Thracian heartland, and Kerdilion, a few kilometers to the east of the city.
Alexander I was the ruler of the ancient kingdom of Macedonia from c.498 BC until his death in 454 BC. Alexander came to the throne during the era of the kingdom's vassalage to Persia, dating back to the time of his father, Amyntas I. Although Macedonia retained a broad scope of autonomy, in 492 BC it was made a fully subordinate part of the Persian Empire. Alexander I acted as a representative of the Persian governor Mardonius during peace negotiations after the Persian defeat at the Battle of Salamis in 480 BC. From the time of Mardonius' conquest of Macedonia, Herodotus disparagingly refers to Alexander I as “hyparchos”, meaning viceroy. However, despite his cooperation with Persia, Alexander frequently gave supplies and advice to the Greek city states, and warned them of the Persian plans before the Battle of Plataea in 479 BC. After their defeat at Plataea, when the Persian army under the command of Artabazus tried to retreat all the way back to Asia Minor, most of the 43,000 survivors of the battle were attacked and killed by the forces of Alexander at the estuary of the Strymona river.
Alexander regained Macedonian independence after the end of the Persian Wars and was given the title "philhellene" by the Athenians, a title used for Greek patriots.
After the Persian defeat, Argilos became a member of the first Athenian confederation but the foundation of Amphipolis in 437 BC, which took control of the trade along the Strymona, brought an end to this. Thucydides tells us that some Argilians took part in this foundation but that the relations between the two cities quickly deteriorated and, during the Peloponnesian war, the Argilians joined with the Spartan general Brasidas to attack Amphipolis. An inscription from the temple of Asklepios in Epidauros attests that Argilos was an independent city during the 4th century.
Like other colonies in the area, Argilos was conquered by the Macedonian king Philip II in 357 B.C. Historians believe that the city was then abandoned and, though excavations have brought to light an important agricultural settlement on the acropolis dated to the years 350-200 BC, no Roman or Byzantine ruins have been uncovered there.
4 comments*Alex10/03/21 at 18:27Jay GT4: Tiny!
021967_l.jpg
DomitianJudea Capta. Caesarea Maritima. AE23, 12.15 g. c. AD 83 or later. Obv. [IMP] DOMITIANVS CAES AVG [GERMANICVS] Laureate head to left. Rev. Athena standing left, placing hand on trophy and holding spear and shield. Hendin 1455; RPC II 2305. Numismatic Naumann Auction 73, Lot 90.1 commentslawrence c10/02/21 at 12:19Jay GT4: Nice Judaean
marius_1.jpg
Marius Antoninianus RIC Vb 10Marius AR (BI) Antoninianus

2.10g, 18.0mm, 180 degrees, Cologne (Colonia Agrippinensis) mint, 269 CE.

Attribution: RIC Vb 10. Cohen 13.

O: IMP C MARIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right.

R: SAEC FELICITAS, Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus & cornucopiae.

Ex-Incitatus Coins
2 commentsRon C210/02/21 at 09:23quadrans: Great coin Smile,
V1071a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1071AR Quinarius, 1.55g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS COS IX; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORY AVGVSTI; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
RIC 1071 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Numismeo, September 2021. Ex ALDE, 19 October 2016, lot 240.

Vespasianic quinarii are extremely rare, and none more so than those struck in 79. When the new RIC II.1 was published only one specimen was known residing in the Budapest collection. In 2016 the present coin came up for auction and later was cited by the RIC authors in the Addenda & Corrigenda as the second known example. Owing to their extreme rarity, it's likely these quinarii may have been struck just prior to Vespasian's death in June. Vespasian revived the quinarius after a long hiatus going back to the time of Augustus. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during his reign.
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/02/21 at 06:18orfew: An excellent acquisition.Congrats
T66.jpg
Titus RIC 66Æ Sestertius, 22.71g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VESTA in exergue; S C in field; Vesta std. l., with palladium and sceptre
RIC 66 (R2). BMC -. BNC 146.
Acquired from Marti Numismatics, September 2021.

The coins from Titus's first bronze issue as emperor are so rare that many are known from only one or two examples. This Vesta type struck for the sestertius is no exception. In the new RIC II catalogue the only specimen known to the authors is footnoted with the following caveat: 'Paris 146 has evidence of re-engraving to the date, so the entry requires confirmation.' Since RIC's publication two others have shown up in trade that indeed clearly verify the reading of COS VII, thus confirming the existence of the type for the first bronze issue. The first new specimen turned up in Bertolami 29 in 2017 and the second is the present coin, both are unsurprisingly reverse die matches with the Paris specimen.

Vesta frequently appears on the bronze coinage with her message of religious piety and security. Her main attribute here is the palladium - a wooden cult image of Pallas Athena which oversees the safety and well being of Rome. Ironically, not long after this coin was struck Mount Vesuvius erupted, a fire broke out in Rome, and a plague befell the city. Perhaps Titus's moneyer's should have struck more of the type?
2 commentsDavid Atherton10/02/21 at 06:17orfew: Very nice portrait on a great coin
T66.jpg
Titus RIC 66Æ Sestertius, 22.71g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VII; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VESTA in exergue; S C in field; Vesta std. l., with palladium and sceptre
RIC 66 (R2). BMC -. BNC 146.
Acquired from Marti Numismatics, September 2021.

The coins from Titus's first bronze issue as emperor are so rare that many are known from only one or two examples. This Vesta type struck for the sestertius is no exception. In the new RIC II catalogue the only specimen known to the authors is footnoted with the following caveat: 'Paris 146 has evidence of re-engraving to the date, so the entry requires confirmation.' Since RIC's publication two others have shown up in trade that indeed clearly verify the reading of COS VII, thus confirming the existence of the type for the first bronze issue. The first new specimen turned up in Bertolami 29 in 2017 and the second is the present coin, both are unsurprisingly reverse die matches with the Paris specimen.

Vesta frequently appears on the bronze coinage with her message of religious piety and security. Her main attribute here is the palladium - a wooden cult image of Pallas Athena which oversees the safety and well being of Rome. Ironically, not long after this coin was struck Mount Vesuvius erupted, a fire broke out in Rome, and a plague befell the city. Perhaps Titus's moneyer's should have struck more of the type?
2 commentsDavid Atherton10/01/21 at 16:21Jay GT4: Tough coin to find
V1071a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1071AR Quinarius, 1.55g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS COS IX; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORY AVGVSTI; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
RIC 1071 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Numismeo, September 2021. Ex ALDE, 19 October 2016, lot 240.

Vespasianic quinarii are extremely rare, and none more so than those struck in 79. When the new RIC II.1 was published only one specimen was known residing in the Budapest collection. In 2016 the present coin came up for auction and later was cited by the RIC authors in the Addenda & Corrigenda as the second known example. Owing to their extreme rarity, it's likely these quinarii may have been struck just prior to Vespasian's death in June. Vespasian revived the quinarius after a long hiatus going back to the time of Augustus. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during his reign.
3 commentsDavid Atherton10/01/21 at 16:20Jay GT4: Great quinarius!
Maxentius_Ostia_modified.jpg
Maxentius AETERNITAS AVG N from Ostia...modifiedMaxentius
A.D. 309- 312
20mm 4.3g
IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG; laureate head right.
AETERNITAS AVG N; Castor and Pollux standing facing each other, each leaning on sceptre with outer left arm and holding bridled horse.
In ex. MOSTS
RIC VI Ostia 35

likely modified for use as a solidus weight
1 commentsVictor C10/01/21 at 16:19Jay GT4: Fascinating piece
Augustus_Irippo.jpg
2 Augustus IrippoAUGUSTUS
Æ Semis of Irippo, Spain, 27 BC - 14 AD

IRIPPO, Bare head of Augustus right within wreath / Female figure seated left, holding pine-cone and cornucopia; all within wreath.

RPC 55; SNG Cop. 152-4. VF, green patina
RI0010
1 commentsSosius10/01/21 at 03:48Skyler: Nice details remining and good to see a legend on ...
Gallienus_Rome_280_countermarked.jpg
Gallienus SECVRIT PERPET from Rome with countermarkGallienus
A.D. 260- 268
Ӕ Antoninianus
20x21mm 3.0g
GALLIENVS AVG; radiate head right.
SECVRIT PERPET; Securitas standing facing, head left, leaning on column to right and holding scepter H in right field.
RIC IV Rome 280


Countermarked as a Spanish 4 maravedis circa 16th[?] century.


topic on countermarked coins
1 commentsVictor C09/30/21 at 23:07v-drome: Amazing!
vlasto_705.jpg
Calabria, Taras AR Nomos. Circa 280 BC.23mm, 7.57 g, 12h.
Youth on horse galloping right; EY to left, [NIK]OΔAMO[Σ] below.
Phalanthos, holding kantharos and distaff, riding dolphin left; ZOP and gazelle below.
Vlasto 705; cf. HN Italy 970/958.
Good VF, toned, struck from worn dies.
1 commentsLeo09/30/21 at 17:23Skyler: Great looking coin
Fausta_Thessalonica_Anepigraphic.jpg
Fausta star reverse from ThessalonicaFausta
A.D. 324- 326
19mm 3.1g
FAVSTA N F; draped bust right.
REV: eight rayed ✶ in laurel wreath.
RIC VII Thessalonica 51
1 commentsVictor C09/30/21 at 17:22Skyler: Great looking coin
GR_Crete_Gortyna_SNG-Cop-3-443v_.jpg
Crete, Gortyna AR stater.Greece. Crete c. 330-270 BC. AR stater (15.23 gm) of Gortyna Europa seated facing in tree, raising her veil and hand on the back of eagle with its wings spread. / Bull stdg right, head reverted. VF. Ex-Thomas Bentley Cederlind, CNG 102 #318; Hirsch 275 (22 Sept 2011) #3648; G. Hirsch 135 (19 Jan 1982), #380. SNG Cop. 3 (Argolis-Aegean Islands) #443v; BMC Crete 30; Boston MFA 117; Svoronos Crète p.168 #84 (pl.XV #7) (same obv die). cf. Heritage Auction 3061 #29134.1 commentsAnaximander09/30/21 at 12:11Pharsalos: Lovely example of this interesting type.
Larissa_Trihemiobol_Facing_Head_L_Horse_Rider_R.jpg
000999 Larissa ¾ Left, Rider on Horse Prancing RightThessaly Greece, the City of Larissa

Obv: Head of the nymph Larissa 3/4 facing l., an ampyx in her hair, wearing a simple necklace and what looks like a single globule earring hanging from the bottom of the base of the last lock of hair on the r. All within a border of dots.
Rev: Thessalian cavalryman on prancing horse r., wearing chlamys and petasos. ΛAPI above l., Σ downwards in front of horse, AIΩN in exergue below the ground line.
Denomination: silver trihemiobol; Mint: Larissa; Date: c. late 4th/early 3rd Century BC1; Weight: 1.38g; Diameter: 13.3mm: Die axis: 180º; References, for example: BMC Thessaly p. 30 no. 60, pl. VI, no. 6; Weber 2855, pl. 110; McClean 4631, pl. on p. 173, no. 25; Traité VI, 725, pl. CCXCIX, 132; SNG Cop vol. 11, 134; SGCV I 2128; SNG Ashmolean 3890 and 3891; BCD Thessaly II 341; HGC 4, 515.

Notes:
1This is the date provided in BCD Thessaly II.
2Babelon sees an H in front of the horse, which BCD Thessaly corrects to a downward Σ.

Provenance: Ex. Zuzim September 16, 2021.

Photo Credits: Zuzim.

Sources
BCD Thessaly II: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. The BCD Collection of the Coinage of Thessaly. Triton XV Auction. (3 January 2012, New York).
BMC Thessaly: Gardner, Percy. A Catalogue of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thessaly
to Aetolia. London, 1883.
HGC: Hoover, Oliver D. The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Vol. 4. Lancaster/London: Classical Numismatic Group, Inc, 2014.
McClean: Grose, S. W. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Volume II The Greek
Mainland, The Aegaean Islands, Crete. London: Cambridge University Press, 1926.
SGCV I: Sear, David. Greek Coins and Their Values. Volume 1: Europe. London: Seaby, 1978.
SNG Ashmolean: Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain V, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford,
Part 4: Paeonia - Thessaly (nos. 3313 - 3934). London: Oxford University Press/Spink and
Son, 1981.
SNG Cop: Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum: Thessaly - Illyricum, Vol. 11. Copenhagen: Einar Munksgaard, 1943
Traité: Babelon, Ernest. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines: Tome Quatrième. Paris: Ernest Leroux, 1926.
Weber: Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann
Weber: Volume II. London: Spink & Son, 1924.

3 commentsTracy Aiello09/30/21 at 12:08Pharsalos: Beautiful coin.
V1071a.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1071AR Quinarius, 1.55g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS COS IX; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: VICTORY AVGVSTI; Victory adv. r., with wreath and palm
RIC 1071 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Numismeo, September 2021. Ex ALDE, 19 October 2016, lot 240.

Vespasianic quinarii are extremely rare, and none more so than those struck in 79. When the new RIC II.1 was published only one specimen was known residing in the Budapest collection. In 2016 the present coin came up for auction and later was cited by the RIC authors in the Addenda & Corrigenda as the second known example. Owing to their extreme rarity, it's likely these quinarii may have been struck just prior to Vespasian's death in June. Vespasian revived the quinarius after a long hiatus going back to the time of Augustus. Striking this denomination was quite in keeping with the antiquarian flavour of the Rome mint during his reign.
3 commentsDavid Atherton09/30/21 at 11:45Pharsalos: Very nice, great rarity.
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