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Roman Imperial: Vespasian as Augustus, Orichalcum Dupondius.Rome 74 A.D. 12.20g - 27mm, Axis 12h.

Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG - Laureate head left.

Rev: PON MAX TR POT P P COS V CENS - Winged caduceus between crossed cornucopiae.

Ref: RIC II 757c.
Provenance: Chris Scarlioli Collection
2 commentsChristian Scarlioli09/27/22 at 06:19Christian Scarlioli: I've always wondered why in old RIC this coin...
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Roman Imperial: Vespasian as Augustus, Orichalcum Dupondius.Rome 74 A.D. 12.20g - 27mm, Axis 12h.

Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG - Laureate head left.

Rev: PON MAX TR POT P P COS V CENS - Winged caduceus between crossed cornucopiae.

Ref: RIC II 757c.
Provenance: Chris Scarlioli Collection
2 commentsChristian Scarlioli09/26/22 at 23:43Trajanus: Very nice head of Vespasian. I have the rarer righ...
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Roman Imperial: Vespasian as Augustus, Orichalcum Dupondius.Lugdunum 77-78 A.D. 11.15g - 27.2mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P - Laureate head right, globe at point of bust.

Rev: FIDES PVBLICA / S-C - Fides standing left, patera in right, cornucopia in left. S-C across fields.

Ref: RIC II 1210, (RIC [1962] 753b), Cohen 166-7; BMC 833.
Provenance: Chris Scarlioli Collection.
1 commentsChristian Scarlioli09/26/22 at 20:11Jay GT4: Regal portrait
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Crawford 447/1, ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Pompey the Great, AR DenariusRome, The Republic.
Pompey the Great & M. Terentius Varro, 49-48 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.77g; 18mm; 2h).
Mint travelling with Pompey in Greece.

Obverse: VARRO·PRO·Q; Diademed, terminal bust of Jupiter, facing right.

Reverse: Scepter flanked by dolphin and eagle; MAGN·PRO|COS in exergue.

References: Crawford 447/1a; HCRI 8; Sydenham 1033; BMCRR Spain 64; Pompeia 7; Terentia 15.

Provenance: Ex Schulman Vault Collection [Schulman Jubilee Auction 365 (22 Oct 2020), Lot 1510]; from a collection formed in 1950s-80s.

In 49 BCE, when Caesar crossed the Rubicon into Italy with his legions, Pompey was forced to flee to Greece to raise an army (his legions at the time were in Spain). This is the last coin type produced for Pompey before the decisive battle of Pharsalus in 48 BCE. Caesar’s victory in that battle would cement Caesar’s prominence in the Roman world and prompt Pompey’s flight to Egypt, where Pompey was immediately murdered by agents of the Ptolemaic royals.

This coin refers to Pompey’s imperium throughout the Roman world and his military prowess on both land and sea. Terminus was the Roman god of boundaries and boundary markers, and terminal busts were typically used as boundary markers in ancient Greece and Rome. In this case, the terminal bust alludes to the borders of the Roman empire over which Pompey had Senate-granted authority. The reverse suggests Pompey’s military successes on sea and land against Mediterranean pirates and Mithridates.

The coin was produced by M. Terentius Varro as Proquaestor. He was not likely the author of the same name, but perhaps his son or grandson.

This type is now generally assigned to a military mint with Pompey in Greece. However, numismatists previously thought it was an earlier issue by a Spanish mint, and it is worth noting the similarity of flan fabric to other Spanish issues – particularly the way flans were chisel-cut, which is particularly visible on the reverse of this specimen at 10h, 11h and 2h. For Spanish issues with similar flan fabric, see Crawford 469/1 (Spain); Crawford 532/1 (Spain). In addition, Crawford 519/2 (uncertain Eastern mint) often shows similar fabric.
6 commentsCarausius09/25/22 at 19:28SRukke: Fantastic!!!
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A group of historic coins.2 commentspaul188809/25/22 at 16:06Ken W2: Historic and beautiful, indeed !
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Domitian RIC 8AR Denarius, 3.13g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P P COS VII DES VIII; Curule chair, wreath above
RIC 8 (R2). BMC p. 299 * note. RSC 372. BNC -.
Ex Savoca Blue 142, 11 September 2022, lot 926.

Domitian seems to have been somewhat in a hurry to strike coins as Augustus after Titus' death in mid September 81 AD, presumably for a legionary donative. This denarius was struck before Domitian had been awarded the power of the tribunate (TR P) and pontifex maximus (PM). Here his only titles are Augustus (AVG), Imperator (IMP), Consul for the 7th time (COS VII), and pater patriae, father of the country (P P). Perhaps it may have taken a few days for the Senate to award the power of the tribunate to Domitian because they had assembled at the small town of Reate where Titus had died and needed to be in Rome in order to vote him the right. The religious ceremonies required for Domitian to assume the title pontifex maximus had not yet finished by this time either, here he is simply PONT, or in other words a member of the College of Pontiffs. Some have argued that PONT is the same as PM, I disagree. Titus as Caesar early on had also used the title PONT on his denarii and he was never pontifex maximus under Vespasian - only the emperor can be Pontifex Maximus or greatest priest. Although this Group 2 denarius is not part of Domitian's first RIC issue, it is very likely to have been struck within the first few days of him assuming the purple. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. Judging by the rarity of the Group 2 denarii they could not have been struck for any great length of time, perhaps for just a few days. The reverse features a pulvinar type carried-over from Titus's last denarius issue struck in celebration of the Colosseum's dedication. It possibly represents the pulvinar of Divus Vespasian, honouring his labours in building the structure. Missing from both the BM and Paris collections.
1 commentsDavid Atherton09/25/22 at 15:54Jay GT4: Great rarity!
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Abraham Lincoln "Rail Splitter of the West" 1860 Political TokenObverse: HON. ABRAHAM LINCOLN above, 1860 below bust of Lincoln facing right, "ELLIS" on truncation of portrait.

Reverse: "THE RAIL SPLITTER OF THE WEST" above a depiction of Lincoln in the act of splitting a fence rail while another figure sits and watches. A log cabin appears in the background.

Medal is holed for suspension as made.

Sullivan-Dewitt: AL 1860-41

Brass, 28 mm

As noted by Jonathan H. Mann, publisher of The Rail Splitter - A Journal for the Lincoln Collector, "this token was part of a huge marketing campaign to shape Lincoln's image as the ideal American. "The "Rail Splitter" appellation refers to an early period in Lincoln's life when he toiled on the frontier, clearing the land, building a homestead. As a candidate for president in 1860, Lincoln campaigned as the 'Rail Splitter of the West,' a slogan and image that propelled him to the White House."
1 commentsMatt Inglima09/25/22 at 15:19Stkp: Very interesting token
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AE Sword #03Likely Northwestern Iran, Talish area
c. 1000 – 800 BC
51.1 cm (20.1")

This short sword may well be unique in its form and details. However, it has some aspects in common with the following:

Cf. Mahboubian (Art of Ancient Iran: Copper and Bronze), 392 (for somewhat similarly shaped guard and cylindrical grip), 396 (for similar cylindrical grip and missing pommel)
Cf. Moorey (Catalogue of the Ancient Persian Bronzes in the Ashmolean Museum), Pl. 7, Fig. 58 (also illustrated on page 81) for sword with somewhat similarly shaped guard, blade, and grip. (However, the blade of the illustrated specimen has blood channels rather than midrib)
Cf. Rafiei-Alavi (The Biography of a Dagger Type), Figure 11

Description:
Wide-shouldered, tapering blade with thick midrib; elliptical penannular guard; slender cylindrical grip with incised linear motifs; pommel missing (may well have been a double-disk/cotton-reel pommel); stable crack through blade at shoulder; abrasions and nicks commensurate with age.

Ex-private San Diego collection
Ex-John F. Piscopo Collection
2 commentsRobert L309/25/22 at 14:38Joe Sermarini: Beautiful!
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A group of historic coins.2 commentspaul188809/25/22 at 05:37Matt Inglima: A beautiful selection!
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AE Sword #03Likely Northwestern Iran, Talish area
c. 1000 – 800 BC
51.1 cm (20.1")

This short sword may well be unique in its form and details. However, it has some aspects in common with the following:

Cf. Mahboubian (Art of Ancient Iran: Copper and Bronze), 392 (for somewhat similarly shaped guard and cylindrical grip), 396 (for similar cylindrical grip and missing pommel)
Cf. Moorey (Catalogue of the Ancient Persian Bronzes in the Ashmolean Museum), Pl. 7, Fig. 58 (also illustrated on page 81) for sword with somewhat similarly shaped guard, blade, and grip. (However, the blade of the illustrated specimen has blood channels rather than midrib)
Cf. Rafiei-Alavi (The Biography of a Dagger Type), Figure 11

Description:
Wide-shouldered, tapering blade with thick midrib; elliptical penannular guard; slender cylindrical grip with incised linear motifs; pommel missing (may well have been a double-disk/cotton-reel pommel); stable crack through blade at shoulder; abrasions and nicks commensurate with age.

Ex-private San Diego collection
Ex-John F. Piscopo Collection
2 commentsRobert L309/24/22 at 23:23Virgil H: Fantastic, a work of functional art
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RIC 1074 Titus denariusT CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS
Laureate head left

TR POT VIII COS VII
Quadriga left with flower

Rome, 79 CE to June 24

3.07g

RIC 1074V (R)

Ex-Classic World Coins (Switzerland)

Although only rated as Rare, this coin with the left facing portrait has been elusive in the market place. Only one example in Forum galleries (Atherton, ex-Sneh). One other example on acsearch, die matched to this specimen.
4 commentsJay GT409/22/22 at 18:24vindelicus: A very interesting coin.
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Legionary denarius.MARK ANTONY AR denarius. Patrae(?) mint. 32-31 BC. 3.79 grs, 6h . Praetorian galley sailing right , with sceptre tied with fillet on prow Mast with banners. ANT • AVG III VIR • R • P • C / Legionary aquila between two standards. LEG XIX below.
Crawford 544/35. RSC 55.

This coins were minted to pay the soldiers of Antony's armies some months before the battle of Actium.
6 commentsbenito09/22/22 at 10:54Ken W2: Oh wow, very nice coin.
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Domitian Denarius, RIC 740Domitianus (81-96)
92/93 AD
Material: Silver
Diameter: 19 mm
Weight: 3.42 g
Mint: Rome
Reference: RIC II Part 1 (second edition) Domitian 740, BMC 202, Cohen 281
Provenance: Nomos Numismatics Zurich, Switzerland
Lightly toned. Extremely fine.
Obverse:
Laureate head of Domitian to right. Inscription: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XII.

Reverse:
Minerva standing to right on capital of rostral column, hurling spear with her right hand and holding shield in her left; at her feet to right, owl facing. Inscription: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P.
1 commentsvindelicus09/21/22 at 22:23Jay GT4: Amazing reverse detail
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Hemidrachm Vespasian Caesaraea, RPC II 1659Vespasianus (69-79)
Hemidrachm
Material: Silver
Diameter: 15mm
Weight: 1.91g
Mint: Caesaraea Eusebia, Cappadocia
Reference: RPC II 1659, Sydenham Caesarea 94, Henseler 71, Metcalf 17
Provenance: Nomos Numismatics Zurich, Switzerland

Obverse:
Laureate head of Vespasian to right. Inscription: YTOKP KAICAP OYECΠACIANOC CEBA for Autokrator Kaisar Vespasianos Sebastos (Imperator Caesar Vespasianus Augustus).

Reverse:
Nike advancing right, holding wreath in right hand and palm branch over shoulder in left.

Extremely fine
1 commentsvindelicus09/21/22 at 22:23Jay GT4: Great example
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Legion XXIII18.17 mm 3.62 gr.
RSC I 60; Sear CRI 383
1 commentsKen W209/21/22 at 22:22Jay GT4: Tough one to get
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Legion XVII CLASSICAE 19.13 mm 3.58 gr.
RSC I 50; Sear CRI 373
1 commentsKen W209/21/22 at 22:22Jay GT4: Great acquisition!
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BCC J61 Domitian Agrippa II Year 26Roman Provincial
Caesarea Panias
Agrippa II 56-95CE
Domitian 81-96CE
Obv: ΔΟΜIΤIANOC ΚΑΙCΑP --
Laureate head of Domitian right.
Rev: ΕΤΟ ΚϚ ΒΑ ΑΓΡΙΠΠΑ
Nike-Victory standing right, left foot on
helmet, writing on shield resting on left
knee; above shield, star. (Year 26 = 86/87 CE).
AE 19.5mm. 4.88gm. Axis:0
Hendin 1285a, RPC II 2279
Surface find Caesarea Maritima, 1977
J. Berlin Caesarea Collection
1 commentsv-drome09/21/22 at 22:21Jay GT4: Lovely portrait
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Trajan AV Aureus RIC 209Trajan, 98-117.
Aureus (Gold, 19 mm, 7.04 g, 6 h),
Rome, circa 104/5-107. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P Laureate head of Trajan to right, with aegis on his left shoulder. Rev. S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI Trajan on horseback to right, about to spear fallen Dacian.
RIC 209. BMC 245 note. Calicó 1109. Cohen -. Woytek 202c.

Nicely reddish toned.

Ex Leu Web Auction 21, 19.07.2022, Lot 4136
Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 78, 26 May 2014, 2196.
1 commentsvindelicus09/21/22 at 22:21Jay GT4: Wonderful
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Baal or Zeus (Interpretatio Graecia) on Cilician Stater of Satrap MazaiosCirca 361-334 B.C. AR Stater (10.88g, 24mm, 5h). cf. SNG Levant-106; SNG Paris-. Obverse Baal of Tarsos enthroned left, head facing, holding club, bunch of grapes, wheat ear, and eagle in right hand, lotus-headed scepter in left hand, B’LTRZ (Baaltarz) in Aramaic behind, M below throne, all within a circle of dots. Reverse lion bringing down bull, attacking with teeth and claws, MZDI (Mazdai) in Aramaic above, unlisted ankh symbol, wheat ear below, all within a circle of dots. Sharply struck on an excellent metal with areas of flat strikes on high points. Choice superb EF/EF. Toned, lustrous.

Ex Ponterio and Associates Sale No. 84, November 1996, lot 141. Ex Stacks Bowers and Ponterio Sale No. 172, November 2012, lot 11680. Ex Pars Coins.

The depiction of Phoenician-Canaanite god Baal on Cilician coinage suggests the preeminence of his cult in Tarsos. He is shown enthroned, most probably on Mount Zaphon. The symbols corn-ear/barley and grapes suggest Baal’s capacity as a god involved in the seasonal cycles of life and death, or a more specific reference to Cilicia’s fertile plains. The iconography of this late coinage is also a syncretic mixture of other cultures, including Greek. The treatment of the god’s body gives us a hint of the extent of influence of Hellenic culture exerted in Eastern Asia Minor long before Alexander’s conquest, and it is said that Baal could be equated with Zeus in the Greek context. After the conquest of Alexander III of the East, Mazaios was appointed governor of Babylon. The new coinage of Alexander was strongly influenced by Mazaios’ pre-Alexandrine coinage (the Zeus Aetophoros commonly found on the reverses of his tetradrachmai is a direct descendant of this). The reverse depicts the City’s Emblem and clearly has an underlying meaning now lost to us. Some say it symbolizes the victory of Day over Night, while others suggest military conquest and subjugation of the enemies by the Persian Empire. Marvin Tameanko has persuasively argued (see Celator, Jan. 1995, pp. 6-11) that the kneeling bull (without the lion) is symbolic of Zeus, as attested on scores of later Greek and Roman coins; and the lion is symbolic of the supreme god Baal of the Cilicians. This concludes the lion-over-bull motif on this coin delivers a message that is blatantly direct and simple, if the argument put forward is to be believed.
5 commentsJason T09/19/22 at 19:05Serendipity: That really is sharply struck! Superb strike!
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Aeternitas, Personification of eternity and stabilityFaustina Senior, wife of Antoninus Pius, Augusta 138-141 C.E.
AR Denarius, Rome mint, 147-161 C.E.
Obv: DIVA FAVSTINA, Draped bust, r.
Rev: AETERNITAS, Aeternitas standing l., holding phoenix and lifting fold of skirt.
RIC-347; Sear-4576; BMC-354; Cohen-11.

Aeternitas personifies eternity and stability. She is depicted with a variety of attributes which may include a torch, globe, phoenix, cornucopiae, scepter or the heads of Sol and Luna; she is often shown leaning against a column or seated on a globe.
1 comments09/19/22 at 19:01Serendipity: Aeternitas holding a phoenix! That’s the best!
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Athena and her owl In Greek mythology, a Little Owl baby (Athene noctua) traditionally represents or accompanies Athena, the virgin goddess of wisdom, or Minerva, her syncretic incarnation in Roman mythology. Because of such association, the bird often referred to as the "owl of Athena" or the "owl of Minerva" has been used as a symbol of knowledge, wisdom, perspicacity and erudition throughout the Western world.
The reasons behind the association of Athena and the owl are lost in time. Some mythographers, such as David Kinsley and Martin P. Nilsson suggest that she may descend from a Minoan palace goddess associated with birds and Marija Gimbutas claim to trace Athena's origins as an Old European bird and snake goddess.
On the other hand, Cynthia Berger theorizes about the appeal of some characteristics of owls such as their ability to see in the dark to be used as symbol of wisdom while others, such as William Geoffrey Arnott, propose a simple association between founding myths of Athens and the significant number of Little Owls in the region (a fact noted since antiquity by Aristophanes in The Birds and Lysistrata).
In any case, the city of Athens seems to have adopted the owl as proof of allegiance to its patron virgin goddess, which according to a popular etiological myth reproduced on the West pediment of the Parthenon, secured the favor of its citizens by providing them with a more enticing gift than Poséidon.
Owls were commonly reproduced by Athenians in vases, weights and prize amphoras for the Panathenaic Games. The owl of Athena even became the common obverse of the Athenian tetradrachms after 510 BC and according to Philochorus, the Athenian tetradrachm was known as glaux throughout the ancient world and "owl" in present day numismatics. They were not, however, used exclusively by them to represent Athena and were even used for motivation during battles by other Greek cities, such as in the victory of Agathocles of Syracuse over the Carthaginians in 310 B.C. in which owls flying through the ranks were interpreted as Athena’s blessing or in the Battle of Salamis, chronicled in Plutarch's biography of Themistocles.
(Source: Wikipédia)
1 comments09/19/22 at 18:56Serendipity: Lovely historical info! Beautifully toned tetradra...
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Queen Elizabeth II Gold Sovereign1964
Obv. Right Facing Queen Elizabeth, REGINA:\ F.D.:ELIZABETH II DEI GRATIA
Rev. St. George on horseback slaying dragon
1 commentsDino09/19/22 at 18:48Serendipity: The young laureate head right of late Queen Elizab...
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George V Gold Sovereign1919-C
Obv. Left Facing King George, GEORGIVS V D.C. OMN:REX F.D.IND:IMP
Rev. St. George on horseback slaying dragon

Sold - Vienna Coin show, Fall 2010.
2 commentsDino09/19/22 at 18:44Serendipity: Very well photographed!
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JULIA DOMNA3 commentsbenito09/19/22 at 18:36Serendipity: Perfect likeness!
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FAUSTINA I, wife of Antoninus PiusAR denarius. Post 141 AD. 3,32 grs. Draped bust right . DIVA FAVSTINA. / Ceres standing left holding torch. AVGVSTA.
RIC III 362 (Pius). RSC 104.
2 commentsbenito09/19/22 at 18:34Serendipity: Wow! Looks exactly like her even down to the hairs...
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Crispina, wife of Commodus, AR denariusCrispina Denarius. CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in bun behind / CONCORDIA, clasped hands.
RIC 279(B), RSC 8, BMC 37
2 commentsvindelicus09/19/22 at 18:31Serendipity: Love her hairstyle!
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Marcus Aurelius RIC III, 338AR - Denar, 3.25g, 18.8mm
Rome, Dec. 175 - Dec. 176
obv. M ANTONINVS AVG GERM SARM
head laureate, r.
rev. TRP XXX IMP VIII COS III PP
Pile of arms
in ex: DE GERM
RIC III, 338
Scarce; VF(?)
added to www.wildwinds.com

Early in 169, the Marcomanni and Quadi crossed the Danube, penetrated the intervening provinces, and entered Italy. The culmination of their onslaught was a siege of Aquileia. The effect upon the inhabitants of the peninsula was frightful. This was the first invasion of Italy since the late second century B.C., when the Cimbri and Teutones had been separately crushed by Marius.
After a rapid mobilization of forces MARCUS AURELIUS turned north and began his counterattacks against the barbarians. First and foremost, the enemy had to be driven out of Italy and then into their own territory beyond the Danube. But it was a time-consuming and expensive operation. 23 Nov. 176 he held the triumph over Germans and Sarmati. Raetia and Noricum became Roman provinces.
2 commentsJochen09/19/22 at 18:29Serendipity: Thanks very much for the historical background!
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Legionary denarius.MARK ANTONY AR denarius. Patrae(?) mint. 32-31 BC. 3.79 grs, 6h . Praetorian galley sailing right , with sceptre tied with fillet on prow Mast with banners. ANT • AVG III VIR • R • P • C / Legionary aquila between two standards. LEG XIX below.
Crawford 544/35. RSC 55.

This coins were minted to pay the soldiers of Antony's armies some months before the battle of Actium.
6 commentsbenito09/19/22 at 18:23Serendipity: Very interesting historical denarius!
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Domitian - RPC II, 2646 (var. date below)Domitianus
AE (Obol), 18 mm, 5.21 gr. Egypt, Alexandria, 91/92 AD
[ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙϹΑΡ ΔΟΜΙΤ ϹƐΒ] ΓƐΡΜ, laureate head left
LIA (year 11), Egyptian sphinx reclining right; date below
RPC II, 2646 (var. date below) - https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/2/2646

A rough provincial coin of Domitian, depicting the famous Great Sphinx of Giza on the reverse.
1 commentsLimes09/18/22 at 13:08Jay GT4: A great piece! Congrats
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Leo III solidusLeo III The Isaurian, solidus (725-732), Constantinople. Sear 1504.1 commentsKingston09/17/22 at 19:30vindelicus: Great coin. Congrats.
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Crusaders, Principality of Achaea. Guillaume II de VillehardouinGuillaume II de Villehardouin
1246-1278
BI Denier, 19mm, 0.75 g, 110 degrees

O: Cross pattée; pellet to right of initial cross

R: Châtel tournois; pellet [and wedge] flanking initial cross.

Ref: Tzamalis GV 223; Metcalf, Crusades 939; CCS 10b

Notes: Group II. Corinth mint. Toned, areas of weak strike. VF.

EX-CNG eAuction 521 Lot 542 (2022); Ex Classical Numismatic Group Electronic Auction 392 (1 March 2017), lot 658.
1 commentsVirgil H09/16/22 at 13:29Anaximander: That's quite a collection of crusader coins!
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Crusaders, Principality of Achaea, Florent of HainautFlorent of Hainaut
1289 - 1297

Billon denier tournois, 19mm, 0.800g, 180 degrees

O: + :FLORENS: P• Ach• (barred A, R with wedge foot = Corinth mint), cross pattée

R: DE: CLARENCIA* (barred A's, R with wedge foot = Corinth mint), castle tournois, concave gable surmounted by a cross

Ref: Metcalf Crusades type F1; Malloy Crusaders 13b

Notes: VF, toned, Corinth mint,

Ex-Forum Ancient Coins, ex-Louis G Estate
1 commentsVirgil H09/16/22 at 13:27Anaximander: Nice example. (rotate obv. to put cross at top).
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BCC LT107 Lead Tessera Fish?Lead Tessera
Roman 1st-4th Century CE
Obv: Fish? to left (or right, if
inverted).
Rev: Blank
Pb11 x 6.5 x 1.0mm. 0.55gm.
Surface find Caesarea Maritima, 1974
J. Berlin Caesarea Collection
1 commentsv-drome09/14/22 at 21:40Virgil H: Very interesting
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Cappadocia, Caesarea. TitusCappadocia, Caesarea. Titus (Caesar, 69-79).
AE22, 7.49 gr.
M.Hirrius Fronto Neratius Pansa, legatus Augusti.
Dated RY 10 of Vespasian (77/8).
Obv. - AYTOKPA TITOC KAI CЄBACTOC - laureate head right.
Rev. - ЄΠI / ΠANCA / ΠPЄCBЄY / TOY / ЄT I.Legend in five lines within wreath.
RPC II 1682; Sydenham 118
Ex. Naumann auct.120, lot 444
2 commentsmaxthrax09/12/22 at 22:35Jay GT4: Very nice!
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Imperial Rome, Domitian denarius 1 commentspaul188809/12/22 at 22:35Jay GT4: Fantastic example
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Cappadocia, Caesarea. TitusCappadocia, Caesarea. Titus (Caesar, 69-79).
AE22, 7.49 gr.
M.Hirrius Fronto Neratius Pansa, legatus Augusti.
Dated RY 10 of Vespasian (77/8).
Obv. - AYTOKPA TITOC KAI CЄBACTOC - laureate head right.
Rev. - ЄΠI / ΠANCA / ΠPЄCBЄY / TOY / ЄT I.Legend in five lines within wreath.
RPC II 1682; Sydenham 118
Ex. Naumann auct.120, lot 444
2 commentsmaxthrax09/12/22 at 15:23David Atherton: Nice example!
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Titus as Caesar RIC 418 [Vespasian] Æ Sestertius, 23.05g
Rome mint, 72 AD
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP PON TR POT COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAESAR DOMITIAN COS DES II; S C in field; Domitian riding l., with sceptre
RIC 418 (R). BMC 628. BNC 615.
Acquired from Andrew Cichos, August 2022.

An early sestertius struck for Titus Caesar featuring a reverse of Domitian Caesar on horseback. The type was commonly struck for Domitian under Vespasian in silver and on the middle bronzes, rarely for the sestertii. It likely commemorates Domitian's role in Vespasian and Titus' joint Jewish War Triumph - 'while taking part in the Judaean triumph, he rode on a white horse' (Suetonius, Domitian, ii), this was the normal practice for a young prince on such occasions. One couldn't ask for better dynastic propaganda than to have Titus pay homage to his younger brother on his very own coinage! This type has always intrigued me because of the contemporary gossip surrounding the brother's negative attitude towards one another. Was this a deliberate attempt to counter those rumours? A double die match with the Paris specimen.
2 commentsDavid Atherton09/11/22 at 21:15Jay GT4: Great find
Vlasto_732.jpg
Taras 280-272 StaterCALABRIA, Tarentum. Circa 280-272 BC. Stater (Silver, 21mm, 6.22 g 5), Aristipp..., Gy... and Di.... ΑΡΙΣ / ΤΙΠΠ Nude male figure standing right, crowning horse ridden by young jockey to left; above to right, ΓΥ. Rev. ΤΑΡΑΣ Phalanthos, nude, riding dolphin to right, holding arrow in his right hand and bow in his left; below right, elephant; below dolphin’s tail, ΔΙ. HN III 1000. Vlasto 732. Toned but with an obverse struck from a worn die, otherwise, nearly extremely fine.

The Tarentine didrachm was reduced from approximately 7.5g to 6.5g after 281 BC to help pay for Pyrrhus’ campaigns against the Romans.
3 commentsLeo09/10/22 at 10:04Anaximander: Lovely detail on the reverse.
Taras_didrachm.jpg
Calabria, Taras didrachmHorseman riding left, holding shield and bridle.

Taras seated on dolphin left TAPAΣ beneath.

Tarentum, Calabria 390-385 BC

7.40g

Scarce

Vlasto 384, Period III, 380-345 BC (Age of Archytas); ; Fischer-Bossert 428, gives date of 390-380 and corresponds to SNG ANS 901.

Ex-Calgary Coin; Ex-Alberta Coin;

Tarentum, the only Spartan colony ever to be established, was founded in 706 BC by the Partheniae - Spartan children born to unmarried women as a product of Spartan desperation to ensure the survival and continuation of their demographic during the bloody Messenian wars, who were later disowned and expelled by the state - and Perioeci (subjects, but not citizens of Sparta), under the leadership of the Parthenian Phalanthos. According to legend, Phalanthos consulted the oracle at Delphi, and was told that he should found his new city 'where rain fell from a clear sky'. After much searching, and despairing of finding a suitable location for a city, Phalanthos was consoled by his wife Aethra who laid his head in her lap, and as her tears splashed upon his forehead he understood the oracle's words for his wife's name itself meant 'clear sky', and thus he determined to make the nearby harbour the site of their new home, which they named after Taras, the son of Poseidon and the nymph Satyrion.
5 commentsJay GT409/10/22 at 10:02Anaximander: Great coin & backstory.
4bMForG5Km9mR8SeNt3YiWs7M6Cdz2~2.jpg
Taras, Calabria470-465 BC
AR Didrachm (18.5mm, 7.95g)
O: Phalanthos riding dolphin left, arms outstretched; scallop shell below.
R: Head of nymph Satyra left, hair tied back in knot, within circular border; all within circular incuse.
Scarce
Vlasto 145 (3rd Group); Fischer-Bossert 95, V49/R63 (Group 5); SNG France 1596-99; SNG ANS 843; HN Italy 838; HGC I, 756
ex Savoca Numismatics

An interesting early, pre-equestrian didrachm featuring Satyra, mother of Taras.
1 commentsEnodia09/10/22 at 00:00Virgil H: Nice
V418a.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 418 [Vespasian] Æ Sestertius, 23.05g
Rome mint, 72 AD
Obv: T CAES VESPASIAN IMP PON TR POT COS II; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAESAR DOMITIAN COS DES II; S C in field; Domitian riding l., with sceptre
RIC 418 (R). BMC 628. BNC 615.
Acquired from Andrew Cichos, August 2022.

An early sestertius struck for Titus Caesar featuring a reverse of Domitian Caesar on horseback. The type was commonly struck for Domitian under Vespasian in silver and on the middle bronzes, rarely for the sestertii. It likely commemorates Domitian's role in Vespasian and Titus' joint Jewish War Triumph - 'while taking part in the Judaean triumph, he rode on a white horse' (Suetonius, Domitian, ii), this was the normal practice for a young prince on such occasions. One couldn't ask for better dynastic propaganda than to have Titus pay homage to his younger brother on his very own coinage! This type has always intrigued me because of the contemporary gossip surrounding the brother's negative attitude towards one another. Was this a deliberate attempt to counter those rumours? A double die match with the Paris specimen.
2 commentsDavid Atherton09/09/22 at 14:49Mat: Love this one, nice addition
McAlee_0118_Trichalkon_Year_126_Caesarean.jpg
McAlee 0118Civic Issue, AE Trichalkon, diameter 21mm, weight 6.22g. Dated year 126 of Caesarean era = 77/78 CE (Marcus Ulpius Traianus, legate). 1 commentsAbu Galyon09/08/22 at 00:47v-drome: Very interesting reverse type!
Marcus-Antonius_LEG-XII_Before-and-After_.jpg
001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), AR-denarius, Crawf 544-26, LEG-XII, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, praetorian galley right, Before and After the Cleaning001a Marc Antony ( 83-30 B.C.), AR-denarius, Crawf 544-26, LEG-XII, ANT AVG III VIR•R•P•C•, praetorian galley right,
avers:- LEG-XII, legionary eagle (aquila) between two standards.
revers:- ANT-AVG-III-VIR•R•P•C•, praetorian galley right.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17-18,5mm, weight: 3,39g, axes: 5h,
mint: Legionary Denarius, date: 32-31 B.C., ref: Crawford-544/26, Sydneham-1230, RSC-41,
Before and After the Cleaning
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans09/08/22 at 00:31Ken W2: Just WOW, on the whole MAL collection!
545_-_546_JUSTINIAN_I_AE_Follis_KYZ_28Cyzicus29.JPG
JUSTINIAN I, AE Follis (40 Nummi), struck 545/546 at CyzicusObverse: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG. Helmeted and cuirassed facing bust of Justinian I holding globus cruciger in his right hand and shield, adorned with rider galloping right spearing a fallen enemy, in his left; cross in right field.
Reverse: Large M, cross above and officina letter below (B = 2nd Officina), A/N/N/O in field to left of M and regnal year X/ЧI/II/I in field to right; in exergue, :K•YZ
Diameter: 34mm | Weight: 19.22gms | Die Axis: 6
SBCV: 207 | DOC: 171b.3

Justinian I introduced the system of dating on the Byzantine bronze coinage in the 12th year of his reign (Regnal year 538/39).

546: On December 17th of this year the Ostrogoths under King Totila plundered Rome and destroyed its fortifications. The city fell after almost a year's siege due to the capture, near the mouth of the Tiber, of a grain fleet sent by Pope Vigilius and the failure of the troops sent by the Byzantine Empire under Belisarius to relieve the city. After sacking Rome the Ostrogoths withdrew to Apulia in southern Italy.
1 comments*Alex09/06/22 at 07:39okidoki: great looks
England_Norman_HenryI_SCBC1276_bg.jpg
Henry I Beauclerc. Pellets in Quatrefoil Penny of Canturbury. England. Norman, Henry I Beauclerc. 1100-1135. AR Penny (1.34 gm) Pellets in Quatrefoil type. Crowned bust facing, with scepter to l., star to r. [+h]ENRICVS R. / Voided quatrefoil w/ star at center, pellets in limbs, trefoil terminals, & lis in quarters ✠…IL..O…CAN. VF. Bt Silbury Coins 2014. Spink SCBC 1275; North 870; BMC type XIV.1 commentsAnaximander09/04/22 at 23:29*Alex: Wow. Superb example.
63C5B86C-5335-45B9-8478-0C8AFF5826D8.jpeg
Athenian Owl Silver TetradrachmAthens, Attica, Greece (c.454-404 BC), Old Style Silver Tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG München 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, EF, well-centred and struck on a tight flan, bold high relief, lightly toned, minor marks, reverse some hoard encrustations, small edge cracks, weight 17.25g, maximum diameter 23.0mm, die axis 330°, Athens mint, c.454-404 BC; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square; from the Roger Belmar Collection; ex Silbury Coins (2020).2 commentsSerendipity09/04/22 at 22:09Enodia: Stunning coin! And a great provenance... nice.
Herakleia_Owl.JPG
Herakleia, Lucania281-278 BC
AR Drachm (16.5mm, 3.82g)
O: Head of Athena, three-quarters facing right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with Scylla throwing stone; Φ behind.
R: Owl with wings closed, standing right on olive branch; club to right, |-HPAKΛEIΩN above, ΣΩΣI to left.
Van Keuren 114; HGC I, 999; HN Italy 1411
Scarce
ex NAC

The colony of Herakleia was a joint venture between the cities of Taras and Thurii, founded in 432 BC and intended to encourage peace between the two embattled polis’ and show a united front against the indigenous tribes of southern Italy. To this end Herakleia became the center of the newly formed Italiote League, probably around 380. This alliance consisted of emissaries from the Greek cities of Kroton, Metapontum, Velia, Thurii, and most notably Taras.
A century later, the period of this coin, Pyrrhus defeated the Roman Consul Laevinius near here, causing the Romans to try a different strategy. A political treaty was struck in 278, granting very favorable terms to the Greek city, and Herakleia became an ally of Rome. As a result the headquarters of the Italiote League was moved to Taras.
9 commentsEnodia09/04/22 at 18:45Serendipity: A scarce and fascinating Greek coin!
tM79Qi3x97fT5JKeEWa8n4cG6HFrZg~8~0.jpg
Velia, Lucania535-480 BC
AR Obol (8mm, 0.61g)
O: Forepart of lion right, tearring at stag's leg.
R: Irregular incuse square.
Williams 34-35; SNG ANS 1221; HN Italy 1261; HGC I, 1337v (lion left)
Rare
ex LAC

A fine example of late archaic art, this is now the oldest coin in my collection.
1 commentsEnodia09/04/22 at 18:35Virgil H: Nice
Trajan_Sestertius.jpg
Trajan RIC - 543Æ Sestertius, 25.30g 35mm
Rome mint, 107 A.D.
Obv: IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P; Head of Trajan, laureate, r.
Rev: S•P•Q•R•OPTIMO•PRINCIPI•S•C•; Trajan, bare-headed, in military dress, cloak floating behind him, riding right, thrusting spear at Dacian below horse
RIC 543 (C). Woytek 317 BMC 833 Sear 3204
Acquired from Monetarium, Ma-Shops. August 16, 2022. ($730)

The reverse of this type is a part of the Roman Emperor Trajan's "Debellator" or conqueror series showing his conquest of Dacia. His series of depicting the conquest of Dacia is split between two different types with one having reverse types depicting personifications of Dacia or typical victorious iconography while the other depicts scenes of excessive violence and humiliation. The more "tamed" reverse types of the conquest of Dacia have been found scattered across the Roman province of Dacia while the more violent and humiliating reverse types such as this one showing Trajan himself running down an unarmed Dacian preparing to spear him on the ground have never been found in the province of Dacia, but rather within Northern Italy and other areas of the empire in order not to provoke the newly conquered Dacians. These more violent issues would have probably circulated amongst the Roman elites and especially the soldiers on the frontier that had been responsible for participating in the conquest of Dacia. The less violent and more typical depictions of victory over Dacia would have served to gradually incorporate the Dacian people into the multicultural empire of Rome. This particular excessively violent reverse image of Trajan spearing the Dacian is meant to show Trajan's military prowess as a great military commander serving the interests of the Roman people. The aggressiveness of this scene is meant to also serve a double meaning to show the Roman army's military superiority and to also show the pointlessness of any further Dacian Resistance against Roman rule. This type may be the most violent of all the coin designs and types that depict Trajan's conquest of Dacia. (Courtesy Corey Ellithorpe's Article Striking a Dissonant Chord: The Geographical Targeting of Trajan’s Debellator Coinage in Dacia)

This type is more rare and is struck in less quantities than the reverse type with the Dacian in front of the horse rather than below.

Extremely Fine style and Dark Patinated surfaces.
2 commentsTrajanus09/04/22 at 13:03David Atherton: Superb example and informative write-up!
Kilikia_01~0.jpg
Asia Minor, Kilikia, Satraps and Kings of KilikiaKilikia
Uncertain Persian King
AR Obol, 400-350 BC
Obv.: Head of female facing slightly left
Rev: King with bow and quiver, stabbing griffin on hind legs with knife
AR, 0.63g, 10,3mm
Ref.: Göktürk 38
Same dies as CNG 70, Lot 362
1 commentsshanxi09/04/22 at 06:23Enodia: Beautiful facing head.
England_Tudor_HenryVIII_SCBC2354_bg.jpg
Henry VIII. Penny of Durham by Bishop Cuthbert Tunstall.England. Tudor, Henry VIII. 1509-1549. AR Penny (0.67 gm, 15mm, 6h) 2nd coinage, sovereign type of Durham, 1530-1534. Bishop Cuthbert Tunstall. King enthroned facing, holding sceptre & globus cruciger. 🟊hˣDˣGˣ ROSΛˣ SiЄˣ SPIΛ (saltire stops). / Long cross fourchée cutting legend. C-D flanking Tudor coat-of-arms. CIVI-TΛS-DVR-RAM. nVF. CNG EA 522 #717. Spink SCBC 2354; North 1813; Allen Durham 211; McCammon SHRT p.75; Stewartby English Coins p.474, Spink Auction 17011 #1626-1627; Whitton ..in Henry’s Name. Durham type (vii).1 commentsAnaximander09/03/22 at 15:06Callimachus: Nice coin.
Larissa3.jpg
Thessaly, Larissa344-321 BC
AE 18mm, 3.98 grams, 0°

O: Head of nymph Larissa facing slightly left

R: Horse left, foreleg raised, about to roll. ΣΑΙΩΝ above ΑΙΩΝ below.

Ref: HGC 4 524; Rogers 283; BMC Thessaly, etc., pg. 32, 87-88 (horse left).

Ex-CNG eAuction 506, Lot 967 (part of)
1 commentsVirgil H09/03/22 at 05:20Enodia: Nice detail and a lovely nymph.
England_Lancaster_HenryVI_SCBC1859_.jpg
Henry VI, First Reign. Rosette-Mascule Groat of Calais. England. Lancaster, Henry VI, First Reign. 1422-1461. AR Groat (3.69 gm) Rosette-Mascle of Calais, 1427-1430. Crowned bust facing in tressure (leaf cusps). 🕂hЄȠRIC✤ DI✤ GR⚻✤ RЄX[✤] ⚻ȠGL ✤Z✤ FR⚻ȠCʹ [Henry, by the grace of God, King of England & France] / Long cross, ∴ in each quarter. C⚻LI-SIЄ✿-VIL-◊L⚻⁑, +POSVI✿-DЄV ᙏ⁑⚻-DIVTOR-Є×ᙏЄVᙏ. Initial mintmark: cross patonce/plain cross (IIIb/V). nEF.
Pegasi Numismatics, Auction V #644. Spink SCBC 1859; North 1446.
1 commentsAnaximander09/02/22 at 04:34Callimachus: What a beautiful coin.
6C96BB04-20D8-4F61-A677-B375AB928F23.jpeg
Julius Caesar. Late 48-47BCThe Caesarians. Julius Caesar. Late 48-47 BC. AR Denarius (17.5mm, 3.84 g, 6h). Military mint traveling with Caesar in North Africa. Diademed head of Venus right / Aeneas advancing left, holding palladium and bearing Anchises on his shoulder. Crawford 458/1; CRI 55; Sydenham 1013; RSC 12; RBW 1600. Deeply toned, obverse slightly off center7 commentssimmurray09/02/22 at 04:19Curtis JJ: Great Aeneas and Anchises on that one!!
eadward-martyr-1c-i.jpg
S.1142 Eadward the Martyr (Æthelstan)Penny of Eadward "the Martyr", king of England 975-978
Moneyer: Æthelstan
Mint: Canterbury
S. 1142
O: EADPEA REX ANGLOR
R: ÆÐESTAN M-O CÆNT

The unfortunate Eadward, with the sobriquet "the Martyr", obviously wasn't destined for long life. Just three years into his reign, the hapless Eadward was killed, probably by his step mother Ælfthryth, mother of his half-brother Æthelred (II).

This particular coin appears to have been from an altered die of Eadgar, with the last three letters of the presumably still serviceable die altered.

Ex- Davissons e-Auction 31 (lot 79), Spink
3 commentsSt. George Collection09/02/22 at 01:55Callimachus: Nice. The altered die is quite interesting. Only t...
corinth~0.jpg
GREEK, Achaean League, Corinth. c. 167-146 BC AR Hemidrachm, Obv: Laureate head of Zeus l. Rx: Pegasus flying r. over AX monogram with A-K-S across fields; all within laurel wreath, tied left. Ex John Twente Animal Collection; ex HJB Buy or Bid, 2/17/1981. About VF, 2.27g. BCD-73.2, Agrinion-583, Clerk-111; Benner-Korinth-11.
HJBerk BBS 159, lot 167.
3 commentsDino09/01/22 at 19:57Anaximander: Great collection of Achaian League coinage!
sikyonc221.jpg
ACHAIA, Achaean League, Sikyon. Circa 160-146 BC.AR Hemidrachm (16mm, 2.34 g, 6h).
obv: Laureate head of Zeus right
rev: Monogram of the Achaian League; above, ME monogram; in fields, N-I; below, dove flying right; all within laurel wreath.

Benner 18; BCD Peloponnesos 322.1. Near VF, toned, a little porous.

Ex BCD Collection (not in previous sales); CNG 221, lot 156.
2 commentsDino09/01/22 at 19:55Anaximander: Fine example of the type. HGC 5 #283
V_703.JPG
Taras, Calabria302-281 BC (Period VI - From Kleonymos to Pyrrhus)
AR Didrachm (20mm, 7.68g)
Nikon magistrate.
O: Naked ephebe vaulting from horse galloping left, holding javelin and small shield in left hand; EY above, [NI]KΩN (magistrate) below.
R: Phalanthos astride dolphin left, holding ear of grain; API to left, TAPAΣ to right, spearhead below.
Vlasto 703; Evans VI, E2; Cote 342; HGC I, 817; HN Italy 969
ex John Jencek

The Tarentine horsemen were renowned throughout the ancient world, serving as mercenary cavalry for many Mediterranean kings including Antigonos I, Demetrios I and Alexander of Epirus. They were so efficient that the term ‘Tarentine Horse’ came to mean any such skirmishing cavalry unit, regardless of their origin.
These were not typical cavalry however, but rather "hippakontistai" (mounted javelinmen), or more specifically "elaphroi", light cavalry which throw javelins and then dismount for close combat.
The scene depicted here is from an equestrian event of the Hyakinthia (the ceremonial games of Hyakinthian Apollo) rather than actual combat, but celebrates those special skills necessary in war. The armed rider would dismount at full gallop, run along side his horse, and then remount in stride.

The didrachm was reduced from c. 7.5g to c. 6.5g after 281 to help pay for Pyrrhus' campaigns against the Romans. However the spearhead on the reverse is in this context definitely an Epirote symbol, making this one of the last coins struck on the old standard.

5 commentsEnodia08/31/22 at 12:05*Alex: Very interesting write up!
vlasto_197.jpg
CALABRIA, Taras. Circa 450-425 BC. AR Nomos8.10 gm.
Dolphin rider l., with both arms extended; beneath, pecten.
Rev. Oecist seated r. on stool, holding staff and cantharus.
Vlasto 197. SNG France 1164 (these dies). F.B. 161. Historia Numorum Italy 844.
Lightly toned and extremely fine.
Ex: from Vinchon collection(1951).
2 commentsLeo08/29/22 at 16:10Leif K: Your collection is stunning, congrats and my respe...
eadward-martyr-1c-i.jpg
S.1142 Eadward the Martyr (Æthelstan)Penny of Eadward "the Martyr", king of England 975-978
Moneyer: Æthelstan
Mint: Canterbury
S. 1142
O: EADPEA REX ANGLOR
R: ÆÐESTAN M-O CÆNT

The unfortunate Eadward, with the sobriquet "the Martyr", obviously wasn't destined for long life. Just three years into his reign, the hapless Eadward was killed, probably by his step mother Ælfthryth, mother of his half-brother Æthelred (II).

This particular coin appears to have been from an altered die of Eadgar, with the last three letters of the presumably still serviceable die altered.

Ex- Davissons e-Auction 31 (lot 79), Spink
3 commentsSt. George Collection08/29/22 at 13:49Anaximander: Facinating
Trajan_Sestertius.jpg
Trajan RIC - 543Æ Sestertius, 25.30g 35mm
Rome mint, 107 A.D.
Obv: IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P; Head of Trajan, laureate, r.
Rev: S•P•Q•R•OPTIMO•PRINCIPI•S•C•; Trajan, bare-headed, in military dress, cloak floating behind him, riding right, thrusting spear at Dacian below horse
RIC 543 (C). Woytek 317 BMC 833 Sear 3204
Acquired from Monetarium, Ma-Shops. August 16, 2022. ($730)

The reverse of this type is a part of the Roman Emperor Trajan's "Debellator" or conqueror series showing his conquest of Dacia. His series of depicting the conquest of Dacia is split between two different types with one having reverse types depicting personifications of Dacia or typical victorious iconography while the other depicts scenes of excessive violence and humiliation. The more "tamed" reverse types of the conquest of Dacia have been found scattered across the Roman province of Dacia while the more violent and humiliating reverse types such as this one showing Trajan himself running down an unarmed Dacian preparing to spear him on the ground have never been found in the province of Dacia, but rather within Northern Italy and other areas of the empire in order not to provoke the newly conquered Dacians. These more violent issues would have probably circulated amongst the Roman elites and especially the soldiers on the frontier that had been responsible for participating in the conquest of Dacia. The less violent and more typical depictions of victory over Dacia would have served to gradually incorporate the Dacian people into the multicultural empire of Rome. This particular excessively violent reverse image of Trajan spearing the Dacian is meant to show Trajan's military prowess as a great military commander serving the interests of the Roman people. The aggressiveness of this scene is meant to also serve a double meaning to show the Roman army's military superiority and to also show the pointlessness of any further Dacian Resistance against Roman rule. This type may be the most violent of all the coin designs and types that depict Trajan's conquest of Dacia. (Courtesy Corey Ellithorpe's Article Striking a Dissonant Chord: The Geographical Targeting of Trajan’s Debellator Coinage in Dacia)

This type is more rare and is struck in less quantities than the reverse type with the Dacian in front of the horse rather than below.

Extremely Fine style and Dark Patinated surfaces.
2 commentsTrajanus08/29/22 at 02:40Jay GT4: Nice
V1221.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1221Æ Dupondius, 11.48g
Lyon mint, 77-78 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P; Head of Vespasian, radiate, r.; globe at point of bust
Rev: ROMA in exergue; S C in field; Roma std. l. on cuirass, with wreath and parazonium; behind, shields
RIC 1221 (C). BMC -. BNC 831.
Acquired from CGB.fr, August 2022.

Lugdunum (modern Lyon) after a brief hiatus struck a fairly large issue of aes coinage under Vespasian in 77 or 78, likely in response to a coin shortage in the Western provinces. Most of the reverse types copy those produced at Rome, such as this Roma. Mattingly in BMCRE II says this about the type - 'The wreath which Roma holds on the dupondius is the sign of Victory, or, perhaps rather the rejoicing for it.' The traditional Greek Amazon guise of Roma is copied from the coinage of Nero and likely is based on a familiar cult image of the goddess. Listed as common in RIC, although missing from the BM.
1 commentsDavid Atherton08/28/22 at 16:28Jay GT4: I've always liked this reverse
eadward-martyr-1c-i.jpg
S.1142 Eadward the Martyr (Æthelstan)Penny of Eadward "the Martyr", king of England 975-978
Moneyer: Æthelstan
Mint: Canterbury
S. 1142
O: EADPEA REX ANGLOR
R: ÆÐESTAN M-O CÆNT

The unfortunate Eadward, with the sobriquet "the Martyr", obviously wasn't destined for long life. Just three years into his reign, the hapless Eadward was killed, probably by his step mother Ælfthryth, mother of his half-brother Æthelred (II).

This particular coin appears to have been from an altered die of Eadgar, with the last three letters of the presumably still serviceable die altered.

Ex- Davissons e-Auction 31 (lot 79), Spink
3 commentsSt. George Collection08/28/22 at 13:37*Alex: Congratulations. Great coin.
RIC_1074.jpg
RIC 1074 Titus denariusT CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS
Laureate head left

TR POT VIII COS VII
Quadriga left with flower

Rome, 79 CE to June 24

3.07g

RIC 1074V (R)

Ex-Classic World Coins (Switzerland)

Although only rated as Rare, this coin with the left facing portrait has been elusive in the market place. Only one example in Forum galleries (Atherton, ex-Sneh). One other example on acsearch, die matched to this specimen.
4 commentsJay GT408/27/22 at 12:45Ron C2: Nice snag!!
CA66A498-5A4C-4235-8FBD-9F1EF588FB38.jpeg
Roman Imperial, Vespasian AD 69-79, 3.11 grams, Obverse: Bust of Vespasian; Reverse: Judaea Trophy to left1 commentspaul188808/27/22 at 02:32Jay GT4: Great reverse!
D291a.jpg
Domitian RIC-291Æ Dupondius, 12.16g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: FORTVNAE AVGVSTI; S C in field; Fortuna stg. l., with rudder and cornucopiae
RIC 291 (C). BMC -. BNC 329 corr. (missing aegis).
Acquired from CGB.fr, August 2022.

This common Fortuna type was repeatedly struck throughout Domitian's reign on his middle bronze coins from 85 onwards. She also fleetingly showed up on the denarius in 82. Mattingly calls this Fortuna 'the special Fortuna that watches over the imperial office'. Suetonius writes that near the end of Domitian's reign on 1 January 96 'The Fortuna of Praeneste, which throughout the whole time he was emperor had habitually given him a happy and virtually the same answer to him whenever he entrusted the new year to her care, finally gave a most gloomy answer - and not without the mention of blood.' This is her first appearance on Domitian's bronze coinage. Missing from both the BM and Paris collections with aegis portrait.
1 commentsDavid Atherton08/26/22 at 11:29Jay GT4: Very nice
Sear-201.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Nicomedia, RY 22 (Sear 201; DOC 135b; MIBE 113a)Obv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVG; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large M, above, cross; to left A/N/N/O; to right X/X/II;below B; NIKO in exergue
2 commentsQuant.Geek08/25/22 at 17:13*Alex: Wow. Superb coin.
Sear-226.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ 1/2 Follis, Antioch (Sear 226; DOC 211c; MIBE 134)Obv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AVG; diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Justinian I right
Rev: Large K; to left, T-H/Є-Ч/O/P arranged either side of cross; Γ to the right
1 commentsQuant.Geek08/25/22 at 17:09*Alex: Nice portrait.
denary_084.jpg
Galbaaw. IMP SER GALBA AVG
Head of Galba, laureate, right
rew. DIVA AVGVSTA
Livia, draped, standing left, holding patera in right and sceptre in left
RIC I (second edition) Galba 150 -153 , or 186
nominał Denar - period fals, or a period imitation
data 68 - 69
1 commentsWaldemar S08/25/22 at 01:51Jay GT4: Interesting piece
RIC_1074.jpg
RIC 1074 Titus denariusT CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS
Laureate head left

TR POT VIII COS VII
Quadriga left with flower

Rome, 79 CE to June 24

3.07g

RIC 1074V (R)

Ex-Classic World Coins (Switzerland)

Although only rated as Rare, this coin with the left facing portrait has been elusive in the market place. Only one example in Forum galleries (Atherton, ex-Sneh). One other example on acsearch, die matched to this specimen.
4 commentsJay GT408/24/22 at 23:40David Atherton: Super rarity!
RIC_1074.jpg
RIC 1074 Titus denariusT CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS
Laureate head left

TR POT VIII COS VII
Quadriga left with flower

Rome, 79 CE to June 24

3.07g

RIC 1074V (R)

Ex-Classic World Coins (Switzerland)

Although only rated as Rare, this coin with the left facing portrait has been elusive in the market place. Only one example in Forum galleries (Atherton, ex-Sneh). One other example on acsearch, die matched to this specimen.
4 commentsJay GT408/24/22 at 21:53Virgil H: Nice one!
_1Cilo200.jpg
L. Flaminius Cilo109-108 BC
AR Denarius (17mm, 3.91g)
O: Helmeted head of Roma right; X beneath chin, ROMA behind.
R: Victory in biga right; L FLAMINI below horses, CILO in ex.
Crawford 302-1; Sydenham 540; RSC Flaminia 1; BMC Italy 537
ex Jack H. Beymer
4 commentsEnodia08/24/22 at 18:50Virgil H: Love these types
Gordianus_Pius_Medaillon.jpg
Roman Empire, Gordian III, Gordianus Pius MedallionObv. IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FELIX AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
Rev. MVNIFICENTIA GORDIANI AVG, Colosseum - within, bull on left fighting elephant on right; to left, Fortuna standing facing behind the Meta Sudans, her head left and holding rudder; to right, statue within small temple or shrine.
Mint: Rome, 244 AD.

37mm 34,84g

Cf. Gnecchi II 23 (pl. 104, no. 6); Banti 54.

Ex Lanz 128, 22 May 2006, lot 654.


In early AD 238, the infamous Year of the Six Emperors, the highly respected but octogenarian Gordian I and his son Gordian II led a revolt in North Africa against the unpopular military emperor Maximinus Thrax. While being recognized by the Senate in Rome, the two Gordiani were slain after a reign of only 20 days. Nevertheless, still anxious to capitalize on their respectable background and popularity, the Senate proclaimed Gordian III, the thirteen-year-old grandson of Gordian I, Augustus alongside Senators Pupienus and Balbinus. As senior statesmen, the latter were supposed to protect the interests of the Senate, while Gordian III. served as figureheads, but Pupienus and Balbinus were deeply unpopular and on July 29, 238 AD the Praetorian Guard murdered them and made Gordian III. to Augustus alone. The inexperienced Gordian III. was heavily influenced by Timesitheus, the Praetorian prefect, who arranged the young emperor's marriage to his own daughter and convinced him that the time was right to attack the Sasanian Persian Empire and its new ruler, Shapur I. In 243, Gordian III. and Timesitheus launched the campaign in Mesopotamia, where they won a victory at Rhaesena and forced the Persians to retreat across the Euphrates. After that the problems started. In the winter of 243-244 AD Timesitheus died under mysterious circumstances and Gordian III. was persuaded by C. Julius Priscus, who had served with Timesitheus as Praetorian Prefect, to appoint Priscus' brother, M. Julius Philippus, as his replacement.
The war resumed under new leadership in early AD 244, and promptly turned the previous year's gains into disaster. According to the Persians, the Romans were defeated at the battle near Misiche (Fallujah), but Roman sources indicate that the campaign was halted by Gordian III, who died under very uncertain circumstances. Philip, announced that the emperor had fallen ill and died of a fever, but it was widely assumed that he was responsible for the death of Gordian III. was involved. Nevertheless, he was immediately proclaimed Augustus by the army and reigned as Philip I "the Arab".

This medallion was minted in AD 244, no doubt before the start of the disastrous new campaign season and while the previous year's victories were still being clinched. The armored portrait type on the obverse presents the young Gordian III. as the new Alexander the Great, ready to inflict yet another defeat on the Persians. The reverse shows a remarkably detailed depiction of the Colosseum with a ferocious animal fight. Combined with the reverse legend referring to the "generosity of Gordian Augustus", the type almost certainly refers to games celebrated in connection with either the previous year's Persian victories or the New Year celebrations, erroneously pointing to new achievements in the Point East (written by NAC).
6 commentskc08/24/22 at 14:15Frans Diederik: once in a lifetime find! Surprised
denary_078.jpg
Trajanaw. IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC
Bust of Trajan, laureate, draped, right
rew. P M TR P COS VI P P S P Q R
Jupiter, naked except for cloak on right and left arms, holding a thunderbolt over Trajan in right hand and straight sceptre in l;Trajan, togate, stands left and holds up branch in right hand
Ric 336
nominał Denar mennica Rzym
data 114 - 117 AD
1 commentsWaldemar S08/24/22 at 03:12Jay GT4: nice fouree
Jug5b.jpg
Jug #5Roman
c. 3rd century AD
10.8 cm (w) x 14.6 cm (h)
(4.25” x 5.75”)

Description:
Loop handle, bulbous body, flared rim, narrow base, ring foot, some mineral encrustations

Ex-Alex Stanichev, Winnetka, CA
1 commentsRobert L308/23/22 at 06:35v-drome: beautiful form
Album-1949.jpg
Inalid of Amid: Jamal al-Din Mahmud (1141-1183) Æ Follis (Album 1949)Obv: Mardin Hoard Countermark #4 (جمال الدين محمود)
Rev:
1 commentsQuant.Geek08/23/22 at 06:30v-drome: Interesting and very nice
Uber002_aurelianus_uberitas.jpg
Aurelianus UberitasIMPC AVREL IANVS AVG
VBERITAS AVG
P 3,1g
1 commentsLEANDRO O08/22/22 at 16:36LEANDRO O: Ric temp #1984 Bust A1 Siscia
B_004_Justinian_I__(527-565_A_D_),_AE-16nummi,_D_N_IVSTINIANVS_P_P_AVG,_Big,_AISP_Chi-Ro_above,_TES,_SB-178,_p-64,_Thessalonica,_Q-001,_6h,_20-23,5mm,_5,94g-s.jpg
B 004 Justinian I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0178, Chi-Ro/AISP/TES, AE-16-nummi, Thessalonica, B 004 Justinian I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0178, Chi-Ro/AISP/TES, AE-16-nummi, Thessalonica,
avers: D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Large AISP, Chi-Ro above the large I, in exergue, mintmark TES.
exergue: -/-//TES, diameter: 20-23,5mm, weight: 5,94g, axis:6h,
mint: Thessalonica, date: A.D., ref: SB 0178, p-64
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans08/22/22 at 16:17*Alex: Congratulations. Great coin.
Justinian-Con-S-163.jpg
96. Justinian I.Follis (40 nummia), 541, Constantinople mint.
Obverse: DN IVSTINIANVS P P AVG / Helmeted and cuirassed bust, facing; holding globe and cruciger. Cross at right.
Reverse: Large M, cross above, ANNO XIIII at sides, Γ between legs of M.
Mint mark: CON
22.82 gm., 38 mm.
Sear #163.

The large M is the Greek numeral 40 -- i.e. 40 nummia is the coin's denomination. The smaller Γ is the Greek numeral 3 -- i.e. the 3'rd officina of the mint at Constantinople. ANNO XIIII is Latin for Year 14 -- the 14'th year of Justinian's reign (541 AD).
In 541, things were going bad for the Empire -- trouble with the Goths in Italy, the Bulgars ravaging the Balkans, and the Persians invading from the east. Bubonic plague swept across the eastern Mediterranean in 541, reaching Constantinople in May 542, before going on to Italy and Gaul.
1 commentsCallimachus08/22/22 at 16:12*Alex: Very nice
D274.jpg
Domitian RIC-274Æ Sestertius, 24.21g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: GERMANIA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Trophy; to r., German captive stg. r., hands bound, head l.; to l., Germania std. l.; around arms
RIC 274 (R). BMC 244. BNC 312.
Acquired from Savoca Coins, August 2022.

In 85 Domitian struck a fairly impressive issue of sestertii, M. Grant hyperbolically called it the most 'ambitious' of any one reign or year. The series is the first major aes issue of Domitian's reign and is dominated by panoramic types commemorating his military victory over the Germanic tribe the Chatti. The details of the war are unclear, but the overall impression is that the conflict was a minor affair blown out of proportion by an emperor eager for military glory. No large battles, a la Mons Graupius, have come down to us, prompting Tacitus' assertion, 'that in recent times, the Germans were more triumphed over than conquered'. Consequently, Domitian's Germanic triumph of 83 received a certain amount of ridicule from ancient writers who thought the whole thing was a sham (Dio goes so far as to say Domitian raided the palace's furniture stores for his fake spoils!), no doubt the numismatic propaganda for the victory was likely viewed in the same manner by contemporary senatorial elites. Germania Capta types were first struck in silver in 84 and in bronze in 85. This iconic Germania Capta sestertius strongly echoes Vespasian's Judaea Capta types - but instead of a palm tree we see a trophy which appears to be mounted on a palm trunk(?). H. Mattingly writes in BMCRE 'the type is closely modelled on the Judaea Capta of Vespasian, but the German element is indicated by the heavy angular cloak worn by the man and by the oblong shields.' Comparing the two triumphs, the Josephian scholar Steve Mason remarked - 'The same people who produced Flavian Triumph I: Judaea were on hand for Flavian Triumph II: Germania, and sequels are rarely as good as the originals.'

The Germania Capta commemorative sestertii were produced for only a few short years between 85-88. The present example from the first issue of 85 debuts this iconic reverse type and is slightly rarer than the variant struck in the second issue.
2 commentsDavid Atherton08/21/22 at 21:53Tracy Aiello: Great coin, David, and as always, a great write-up...
EC803D9F-A869-4FEA-A847-CB8CCDDC715E.jpeg
Nero AD 54-68. Æ As (28mm, 10.45 g.)
Rome mint, struck circa AD 65
Obv. Bare head right.
Rev. Victory flying left, holding shield inscribed SPQR
RIC I 543
1 commentspaul188808/21/22 at 17:39Jay GT4: Lovely portrait
ADJ_4.jpg
Phoenicia, Arados 130-129 B.C AE 21.63mm (Thickness 3.37mm), weight 7.16g, die axis = 12h (0 degrees), denomination B.

Obverse: Turreted head of Tyche right, S shaped ponytail, palm frond behind.

Reverse: Poseidon seated left on prow of galley holding wreath in right hand and trident in left, Athena figurehead (Ἀθηνᾶ Πρόμαχος), Phoenician letters nun (N) and aleph (´) above, Aradian era date 130 with resh (R) below.
3 commentsArados08/21/22 at 16:31Arados: Thanks for your comments, much appreciated.
D274.jpg
Domitian RIC-274Æ Sestertius, 24.21g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: GERMANIA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Trophy; to r., German captive stg. r., hands bound, head l.; to l., Germania std. l.; around arms
RIC 274 (R). BMC 244. BNC 312.
Acquired from Savoca Coins, August 2022.

In 85 Domitian struck a fairly impressive issue of sestertii, M. Grant hyperbolically called it the most 'ambitious' of any one reign or year. The series is the first major aes issue of Domitian's reign and is dominated by panoramic types commemorating his military victory over the Germanic tribe the Chatti. The details of the war are unclear, but the overall impression is that the conflict was a minor affair blown out of proportion by an emperor eager for military glory. No large battles, a la Mons Graupius, have come down to us, prompting Tacitus' assertion, 'that in recent times, the Germans were more triumphed over than conquered'. Consequently, Domitian's Germanic triumph of 83 received a certain amount of ridicule from ancient writers who thought the whole thing was a sham (Dio goes so far as to say Domitian raided the palace's furniture stores for his fake spoils!), no doubt the numismatic propaganda for the victory was likely viewed in the same manner by contemporary senatorial elites. Germania Capta types were first struck in silver in 84 and in bronze in 85. This iconic Germania Capta sestertius strongly echoes Vespasian's Judaea Capta types - but instead of a palm tree we see a trophy which appears to be mounted on a palm trunk(?). H. Mattingly writes in BMCRE 'the type is closely modelled on the Judaea Capta of Vespasian, but the German element is indicated by the heavy angular cloak worn by the man and by the oblong shields.' Comparing the two triumphs, the Josephian scholar Steve Mason remarked - 'The same people who produced Flavian Triumph I: Judaea were on hand for Flavian Triumph II: Germania, and sequels are rarely as good as the originals.'

The Germania Capta commemorative sestertii were produced for only a few short years between 85-88. The present example from the first issue of 85 debuts this iconic reverse type and is slightly rarer than the variant struck in the second issue.
2 commentsDavid Atherton08/21/22 at 16:15Jay GT4: Great historical type
otacilia-severa-augusta-244-249-antoninianus-8305899.jpg
032. Otacilia Severa AR Antoninianus PVDICITIAOtacilia Severa, Augusta, 244-249. Antoninianus (Silver, 22 mm, 4.34 g, 6 h), Rome, 244-245. MARCIA OTACIL SEVERA AVG Diademed and draped bust of Otacilia Severa set to right on crescent. Rev. PVDICITIA AVG Pudicitia seated left, raising veil with her right hand and holding long transverse scepter in her left. Cohen 53. RIC 123c. A lovely example with a sharply struck portrait. Struck from a slightly worn reverse die and with minor deposits, otherwise, good extremely fine.
From the collection of Dipl.-Ing. Adrian Lang.
2 commentsLordBest08/21/22 at 02:51David Atherton: Fantastic!
constantine_principi_ric_231.jpg
Constantine 7.07.035Constantine
Obv CONSTANTINVS AVG
(Laur. helmet left, cuirassed, spear over right shoulder, shield on left arm )
Rev PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS
(Prince standing facing, head left, cloak hanging from left shoulder, right hand holding globe, left reversed spear)
| *
PLN in ex
London
4.0 g
RIC VI 231 LMCC 7.07.035 (R)
(ex Cerberus Coins)
1 commentsNoviomagus08/20/22 at 02:43Jay GT4: Great detail on the helmet
D482A.jpg
Domitian RIC-482AÆ Dupondius, 10.44g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XII CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Mars adv. l., with Victory and trophy
RIC 482A (R3). BMC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Den of Antiquity, August 2022.

The Mars advancing right type was struck for Domitian's middle bronzes for a short period between 85-87 AD. No doubt it was part of the massive Germania Capta series struck on the coinage in the wake of the Chattan war. Notably it copies a reverse design previously struck for Vespasian's sestertii. This specimen is an extremely rare variant featuring an obverse portrait lacking aegis. The overwhelming majority of aes portraits from the issue were struck with aegis. The mint engraver's would gradually move away from aegis portraits over the next couple of years, but in 86 they were dominate and any deviation can be chalked up to engraver's whim. Second known specimen. Listed as unique in the RIC II.1 Addenda.
1 commentsDavid Atherton08/19/22 at 19:40Jay GT4: Good eye to spot the missin aegis!
116099.jpg
Crawford 13/1, ROMAN REPUBLIC - AR DidrachmRome, The Republic.
Anonymous, 310-300 (c. 295?) BCE.
AR Didrachm (7.13g; 21mm).
Mint in Central Italy (Neapolis?).

Obverse: Head of Mars, bearded, in crested Corinthian helmet, facing left; oak spray behind.

Reverse: Bridled horse head facing right; [ROMANO] on base below; wheat stalk behind.

References: Crawford 13/1; HNI 266; Sydenham 1; BMCRR (Romano-Campanian) 1-4.

Provenance: Ex vAuctions Sale 343 (6 Dec 2019) Lot 155; Pegasi Auction VI (8 April 2002), Lot 316.

This coin is part of the very first series of Didrachms produced in the name of Rome. It was a small issue, with only four obverse dies and fifteen reverse dies currently known. In 1974’s Roman Republican Coinage, Crawford assigned the issue to 280-276, however, subsequent evidence and scholarship caused him to reassign the coins to 310-300 BCE. Later scholars, including Rutter in Historia Numorum Italy (2001) have concurred with this revised dating. In a recent tweet, Professor Liv Yarrow announced that her forthcoming book will propose a more recent date of c. 295 BCE; we’ll have to wait for her book to see the evidence to support this re-dating.

While these didrachms bore the inscription ROMANO, they were not struck in Rome and didn’t really circulate in Rome! They were likely produced in Naples or some other nearby mint for a particular purpose. In Coinage & Money Under the Roman Republic (1985), Crawford proposed that the purpose for the issue was the construction of the Appian Way from Rome to Capua, begun in 312 BCE. If Professor Yarrow's proposed later dating is correct, the purpose would need to be reconsidered. The average weight and purity of these coins is consistent with contemporaneous Neapolitan standards, and the fabric of the coins is also consistent with Neapolitan silver issues.

The ROMANO inscription may have been either an abbreviation of the genitive plural ROMANORVM (“of the Romans”) or dative ROMANO (“by the Romans”) either of which would be similar grammar to Greek coin inscriptions.
5 commentsCarausius08/18/22 at 18:44Anaximander: Lovely coin.
2245339l.jpg
Crawford 21/4, ROMAN REPUBLIC, Aes Grave Quadrans Rome, The Republic.
Anonymous, c. 265 BCE.
AE Aes Grave Quadrans (68.58g; 43mm).
Rome Mint.

Obv: Right hand; ●●● (mark-of-value = 3 unciae) on left.

Rev: Left hand; ●●● (mark-of-value) on right.

References: Vecchi, ICC 44; Haeberlin pp. 66-67, plts 27-28; Crawford 21/4.

Provenance: Ex Baldwin's Auction 99 (4 May 2016), Lot 599; purchased from A.H. Baldwin & Sons, Ltd., Dec 1959.
5 commentsCarausius08/18/22 at 18:43Anaximander: Got to HAND it to you, you pick 'em! Wink
RPC_II_1673A_Domitianus.jpg
RPC II 1673A DomitianusObv: AYT KAI ΔOMITIANOC ΣEBACTOC ΓEPM, Laureate head right
Rev: ETO ΙΓ (across field), Bust of Amazon l., with long curls on neck; over shoulder, bipennis
AR/Didrachm (21.55 mm 5.915 g 6h) Struck in Rome (for Cappadocia) 93-94 AD
RPC II 1673A.1 (this coin), Metcalf unpublished
ex Savoca 95th Silver Auction lot 423
4 commentsFlaviusDomitianus08/18/22 at 16:06Anaximander: A handsome coin. Wink
RPC_II_1673A_Domitianus.jpg
RPC II 1673A DomitianusObv: AYT KAI ΔOMITIANOC ΣEBACTOC ΓEPM, Laureate head right
Rev: ETO ΙΓ (across field), Bust of Amazon l., with long curls on neck; over shoulder, bipennis
AR/Didrachm (21.55 mm 5.915 g 6h) Struck in Rome (for Cappadocia) 93-94 AD
RPC II 1673A.1 (this coin), Metcalf unpublished
ex Savoca 95th Silver Auction lot 423
4 commentsFlaviusDomitianus08/17/22 at 23:52Blindado: I have a collection of coins depicting amazons (se...
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