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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Personifications ▸ HappinessView Options:  |  |  |   

Happiness (Felicitas)

Happiness, cheerfulness and joy (or gaiety) are personified on Roman coins by Felicitas, Hilaritas and Laetitia. Coins with these subjects celebrated the brighter side of life, or in harder times explained that the Empire was moving toward a happier future.


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D.

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The double sestertius, easily distinguished by its radiate crown, was also issued by Gallienus and especially by Postumus. This rare denomination, equal in value to the obsolete silver quinarius, was introduced with this issue. The c. 4g brass "semis" introduced at the same time, may well have been a "reduced as" half of the c. 8.5 gram dupondius, one quarter of the c. 17 g sestertius, and one eighth of this coin. Completing the sub-antoninianus denominations, a rare, small, silver coin of c. 1.6 g was a denarius.
SH82658. Orichalcum double sestertius, RIC IV 115c & pl. 12, 16 (R); Cohen V 40 (30 fr.); Hunter III 46 & pl. 78; SRCV III 9395, gVF, attractively centered on a full flan, green and brown surfaces, minor roughness, small areas of light smoothing , closed flan crack at obv. 7:00, weight 37.403 g, maximum diameter 37.0 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Rome mint, 3rd emission, 250 A.D.; obverse IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse FELICITAS SAECVLI (age of good fortune), Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, long caduceus grounded and vertical in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; ex CNG e-auction 410 (29 Nov 2017), lot 379; $1290.00 (1096.50)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

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From 114 to 117 A.D. the Jews of Cyprus revolted and massacred gentiles in great numbers. After the uprising was put down, every known Jew in Cyprus was killed and a law was passed forbidding any Jew, even from a shipwreck, to set foot on the island. Nevertheless Jewish residents remained on the island and in 610 A.D. they were sufficiently numerous to participate in an insurrection against Heraclius. In 646, and again in 1154, Cyprus was devastated by Arabs.
RB86780. Orichalcum sestertius, Woytek 534v, RIC II 672, BMCRE III 1023, Hunter II 375, Cohen II 352, Banti 106, SRCV II 3192, BnF IV -, Choice VF, well centered and struck, nice portrait, brown tone, nice surfaces, minor bump on cheek, weight 24.276 g, maximum diameter 34.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, winter 114 - early 116 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, laureate and draped bust right; reverse SENATVS POPVLVSQVE ROMANVS, Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; $700.00 (595.00)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

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Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS83948. Silver denarius, RSC II 805a, BMCRE IV 62, RIC III 15, Hunter II -, SRCV II -, gVF, centered on a tight flan, radiating flow lines, die wear, small edge cracks, weight 2.588 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 10 Dec 180 - 10 Dec 181 A.D.; obverse M ANTONINVS COMMODVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse TR P VI IMP IIII COS III P P, Felicitas standing facing, head left, raising caduceus in right hand, long grounded scepter near vertical in left hand; Numismatik Naumann, auction 62, lot 1105 (part of); $130.00 (110.50)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

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Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS87528. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 3, RSC IV 124, Hunter III 4, SRCV III 8944, VF, excellent portrait, centered on a broad flan, toned, die wear, edge splits, weight 3.040 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 246 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M TR P III COS P P, Felicitas standing left, long caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from an American collection; $80.00 (68.00)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 280, Proculus, a Roman usurper, started a rebellion at Lugdunum (Lyon, France) and proclaimed himself emperor. Probus suppressed the revolt and Proculus was executed.
RA47769. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V-2 104, Bastien IX 269, aMS, weight 3.473 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, obverse IMP C PROBVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse TEMPOR FELICI (time of good fortune), Felicitas standing right holding long caduceus in right and cornucopia inwardly in left, I in exergue; full, solid silvering; $50.00 (42.50)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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In 267 A.D., the Goths, originally from Scandinavia, along with the Sarmatians, originally from the area of modern Iran, first invaded the Empire. They ravaged Moesia, Thrace, the Balkans and Greece. In southern Greece, the cities they sacked included Athens, Corinth, Argos and Sparta. An Athenian militia force of 2,000 men, under the historian Dexippus, pushed the invaders north where they were intercepted by the Roman army under Gallienus. Gallienus defeated them near the Nestos River, on the boundary between Macedonia and Thrace.
RS64645. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 331a, RIC V-2 325, Hunter IV 79, Elmer 593, Mairat 143, Schulzki AGK 77, Cunetio 2444, SRCV III 10983, VF, well centered, sightly porous, weight 4.506 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 0o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 266 - 267 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right from the front; reverse SAECVLI FELICITAS (era of good fortune), Postumus standing right, bare-headed, wearing military attire, transverse spear in right hand, globe in extended left hand; $45.00 (38.25)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS64653. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 39, Schulzki AGK 14, RIC V-2 58, Hunter IV 49, Elmer 335, SRCV III 10936, VF, well centered, small edge cracks, weight 3.289 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, c. 265 - 268 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse FELICITAS AVG (the good fortune of the Emperor), Felicitas standing half left, long grounded caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $40.00 (34.00)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS64659. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 39a, Schulzki AGK 14, RIC V-2 58, Hunter IV 49, Elmer 335, SRCV III 10936, gVF, well centered, flan a little ragged, weight 3.446 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 45o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 265 - 268 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse FELICITAS AVG (the good fortune of the Emperor), Felicitas standing half left, long grounded caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $40.00 (34.00)


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

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Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RB87543. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 676, BMCRE VI 487, Cohen IV 21, Hunter III 18, SRCV II 8228, VF/F, nice portrait, squared flan, encrustations, corrosion, small edge cracks, weight 18.224 g, maximum diameter 30.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 228 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, wearing stephane, hair in waved horizontal ridges, looped plait at back of neck; reverse FELICITAS PVBLICA (to the good fortune / happiness of the public), Felicitas standing front, head left, raising caduceus in right, legs crossed, leaning with left arm on column, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; $40.00 (34.00)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Fortuna distributed good and evil among mankind according to her caprice and without any regard to merit.
RS87529. Fouree silver plated denarius, cf. RSC III 55, RIC IV S552, BMCRE V S24, SRCV II 6583 (official, silver, Rome mint, 210 A.D.), VF, nice portrait, dark toning, bumps and scratches, edge chips, areas of exposed base metal core, weight 2.224 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 180o, unofficial criminal mint, c. 210 - 215 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse FORTVNAE FELICI (to happy Fortuna), Fortuna standing slightly left, head left, out-turned cornucopia in right, left elbow rests on reversed rudder; $32.00 (27.20)




  



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Happiness