Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Asian CoinsView Options:  |  |  | 

Asian Coins

Sasanian Empire, Khusro II, Occupation of Egypt, 618 - 628 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
During his temporary domination of Egypt, 618 - 628 A.D., Khusru allowed the Alexandria mint to continue issuing the normal Byzantine coinage, but substituted his portrait for the Byzantine emperor's. The sun and moon replaced the obverse legend, just as on contemporary Sasanian coinage. It may seem strange that a Persian king would wear a crown surmounted by a cross; however, his wife Sira was a Christian, he was a benefactor of the church of St. Sergius in Edessa, he honored the Virgin, and he sometimes wore a robe embroidered with a cross which he had received as a gift from the Emperor Maurice Tiberius. The Byzantine emperors resumed the imperial coinage of Alexandria after their recapture of Egypt in 628 A.D.
WA77071. Bronze 12 nummi, DOC II, part 1, 191; Hahn MIB 202b; Wroth BMC 277; Tolstoi 109; Ratto 1316; Morrisson BnF 10/Al/AE/32; SBCV 855; Sommer 11.92, aVF, as-found slightly rough near black patina, well centered, weight 10.428 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Alexandria mint, 618 - 628 A.D.; obverse bust of the Sassanid King Khusru II wearing a crown with pendilia and surmounted by a cross, star left, crescent moon right; reverse large I B with cross potent on globe between, AΛEZ in exergue; from the J. Berlin Caesarea Collection, Caesarea Maritima surface find; $120.00 (106.80)


Baktrian Kingdom, Euthydemos I Theos Megas, c. 225 - 195 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Euthydemus was allegedly a native of Magnesia and a son of General Apollodotus. According to Polybius, Euthydemus was a Satrap of Sogdiana who ousted the dynasty of Diodotus from Bactria and made himself king. His kingdom seems to have been substantial, including Sogdiana to the north, and Margiana and Ariana to the south or east of Bactria. When Antiochus III the Great attacked in 208 B.C., Euthydemus lost the Battle of the Arius but then resisted a three-year siege in the fortified city of Bactra. Euthydemus negotiated peace asserting that he toppled the descendants of the rebel Diodotus and provided a barrier to barbarian invasions. Antiochus decided to recognize him as king, and offered one of his daughters to Euthydemus' son Demetrius.
AW73959. Bronze double unit, Kritt Dynastic AK-1, Bopearachchi series 17, SNG ANS 147, Mitchiner IGIS 87, SGCV II 7523, HGC 12 53 (R1), F, thick flan with beveled edge, corrosion, weight 7.245 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 45o, Ai Khanoum mint, c. 225 - 208/6 B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right; reverse horse prancing right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ above, EYΘY∆HMOY below; scarce; $100.00 (89.00)


Indo-Scythian Kingdom, Azes II, c. 35 B.C. - 5 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Azes II may have been the last Indo-Scythian king in the northern Indian subcontinent (modern day Pakistan). Indo-Scythian rule crumbled under the conquests of the Kushans who expanded into India to create the Kushan Empire. Senior and Hoover now believe Azes II did not exist and attribute all Azes coins to Azes I or as posthumous imitative issues. A type attributed to Azes I has been found overstruck on a coin traditionally attributed to Azes II, supporting their hypothesis.
WA90095. Bronze hexachalkon, Senior 102.193, Mitchiner ACW 2386, Mitchiner IGIS 850f, HGC 12 657, aVF, weight 12.825 g, maximum diameter 29.4 mm, die axis 135o, Taxila Sirsukh B(?) mint, c. 35 B.C. - 5 A.D.; obverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ BAΣIΛEΩN MEΓAΛOY AZOY (King of Kings, Azes the Great), humped bull standing right, Kharosthi monogram above, Kharosthi letter "jha" before forelegs; reverse Kharosthi legend: Maharajasa rajadirajasa mahatasa Ayasa (great king, king of kings, Azes the Great), mane-less lion standing right, Kharosthi monogram above; ex Ancient Imports; $60.00 (53.40)


India, Kabul and Gandhara, Anonymous Post-Shahi, 1021 - 1200 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Mitchiner notes the Ghaznavids occupied the Shahi Kingdom and some of these coins may have been struck by them, however, the major issuers were probably the Chahamanas.
WA74839. Billon jital, "Bull and Horseman" jital; cf. Palomares Bueno type 3, MacDowall 33bis, Mitchiner NI 473, Deyell 235-236, Tye 33, VF, small tight flan dumpy fabric, light corrosion, light earthen deposits, weight 3.418 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 225o, c. 1021 - 1200 A.D.; obverse Sri Samanta Deva, Recumbent zebu left, star and crescent before; reverse sarada aksara, horseman right, holding banner, 'Bhi' on left; $38.00 (33.82)


China, Northern Song Dynasty, Emperor Zhe Zong, 1086 - 1100 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
"Round as the heavens, square as the earth," is a Chinese saying used to metaphorically describe the fabric of the coins. On the practical side, it was discovered very early that a square hole fit a square shaft, which enabled a stacked quantity of coins to be turned on a lathe to remove casting irregularities.
CH54355. Bronze 2 cash, Shao Sheng Yuan Bao, seal script, clockwise, small size; Hartill 16.303, Schjoth 593, Fisher 995, VF, weight 6.810 g, maximum diameter 30.6 mm, 1094 - 1097 A.D.; very common; $18.00 (16.02)


China, Northern Song Dynasty, Emperor Hui Zong, 1101 - 1126 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
"Round as the heavens, square as the earth," is a Chinese saying used to metaphorically describe the fabric of the coins. On the practical side, it was discovered very early that a square hole fit a square shaft, which enabled a stacked quantity of coins to be turned on a lathe to remove casting irregularities.
CH85528. Bronze 2 cash, Sheng Song Yuan Bao, seal script, clockwise, Hartill 16.369, Schjoth 612, Fisher 1025, VF, weight 7.582 g, maximum diameter 30.1 mm, 1101 A.D.; $15.00 (13.35)


China, Northern Song Dynasty, Emperor Hui Zong, 1101 - 1126 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
"Round as the heavens, square as the earth," is a Chinese saying used to metaphorically describe the fabric of the coins. On the practical side, it was discovered very early that a square hole fit a square shaft, which enabled a stacked quantity of coins to be turned on a lathe to remove casting irregularities.
CH85529. Bronze 2 cash, Sheng Song Yuan Bao, seal script, clockwise, Hartill 16.369, Schjoth 612, Fisher 1025, VF, weight 9.007 g, maximum diameter 30.7 mm, 1101 A.D.; $15.00 (13.35)


China, Northern Song Dynasty, Emperor Zhe Zong, 1086 - 1100 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
"Round as the heavens, square as the earth," is a Chinese saying used to metaphorically describe the fabric of the coins. On the practical side, it was discovered very early that a square hole fit a square shaft, which enabled a stacked quantity of coins to be turned on a lathe to remove casting irregularities.
CH35338. Bronze 1 cash, Shao Sheng Yuan Bao, seal script, clockwise, large bao; Hartill 16.290, Schjoth 585, Fisher 990, VF, weight 3.973 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, 1094 - 1097 A.D.; very common; $9.00 (8.01)


China, Former Shu Kingdom, Wang Yan, Son of Wang Jian, 919 - 925 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Wang Yan's father was a village thief before, enlisting in the army, rising through the ranks, and eventually seizing control of the modern Sichuan and Chongqing region. Wang Yan was the youngest son but became heir because his mother, Consort Xu, was Wang Jian's favorite concubine and was able to gain the support of the chancellor Zhang Ge. Wang Yan's reign has been traditionally considered one of decadence, corruption, and incompetence. In 925, his state was conquered by its northeastern neighbor Later Tang. Wang Yan surrendered but was executed and posthumously demoted to commoner rank. Schjoth notes: "The currency of the father and son of the Wang family was coarse and vile."
CH36131. Bronze 1 cash, Qian De yuan bao, seal script, clockwise, large bao; Hartill 15.42, Schjoth 433, VF, weight c. 3.43 g, maximum diameter c. 23.7 mm, Sichuan, Chengdu mint, 919 - 924 A.D.; Forum's random selection from the coins in the photograph, one coin; common; $7.00 (6.23)


China, Northern Song, Emperor Tai Zu, 960 - 976 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Zhao Kuangyin (later Emperor Taizu) was from a family of modest origins.

According to legend, as a child, he found an untamed horse to practice archery on horseback. The horse threw him into a wall. Witnesses thought he was seriously injured but he jumped up unharmed and chased down and subdued the horse.

When his father lost his government position, he wandered for two years but a monk, seeing through his beggar appearance, noticed his unusual aura and told him to go north where there was war and he would fight and become famous.

He distinguished himself in the army, was promoted a commander of cavalry units, and the future Emperor Shizong noticed his potential. After he rallied 4000 palace troops and held off the Liao army until reinforcements arrived, he was made Chief of the Palace troops. He continued his rise and was promoted to jiedushi, controlling most of the military power under Shizong.

When Shizong died, the throne was left to an infant. After a "prophet" reported a vision of two suns, which was interpreted as the transfer of the Heaven's Mandate, the troops declared Taizu emperor. He met no resistance and was proclaimed Taizi, the Emperor of Song. Taizu sent the dethroned baby-emperor with his mother to Xi Jing and personally ordered the Chai family to receive the Zhaos into their family's care for generations.

CH36137. Bronze 1 cash, Song Yuan Tong Bao, regular script, VF, weight 3.6 g, maximum diameter 25 mm, 960 - 962 A.D.; Forum's random selection from the coins in the photograph, one coin; $6.00 (5.34)











Catalog current as of Friday, September 22, 2017.
Page created in 1.513 seconds.
Asian Coins