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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Asian CoinsView Options:  |  |  |   

Asian Coins

China, Northern Zhou Dynasty, Emperor Wu, 557 - 581 A.D.

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Zhou_Wu_TangEmperor Wu of Northern Zhou (543578), personal name Yuwen Yong, nickname Miluotu, was an emperor of the Xianbei dynasty Northern Zhou. As was the case of the reigns of his brothers Emperor Xiaomin and Emperor Ming, the early part of his reign was dominated by his cousin Yuwen Hu, but in 572 he ambushed Yuwen Hu and seized power personally. He thereafter ruled ably and built up the power of his military, destroying rival Northern Qi in 577 and annexing its territory. His death the next year, however, ended his ambitions of uniting China, and under the reign of his erratic son Emperor Xuan (Yuwen Yun), Northern Zhou itself soon deteriorated and was usurped by Yang Jian in 581.
CH89208. Bronze 5 wu zhu, Bu Quan (spade coin); Hartill 13.29, Schjoth 245, Fisher 639, Choice VF, nice green patina, light deposits, weight 3.369 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, 561 - 576 A.D.; obverse Bu Quan (stroke in the middle of Quan is continuous); reverse plain; $150.00 (127.50)


China, Southern Song Dynasty, Emperor Xiao Zong, 1163 - 1190

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Emperor Xiaozong of Song started his reign in 1162 when his adoptive father and predecessor, Gaozong, abdicated and passed the throne to him. Even though Emperor Gao zong became a Taishang Huang ("Retired Emperor") after his abdication, he remained the de facto ruler, so Emperor Xiaozong only fully took over the reins of power in 1187 after Emperor Gaozong's death. After ruling for about a year, Emperor Xiaozong followed in his predecessor's footsteps and abdicated in favor of his third son Zhao Dun (Emperor Guangzong), while he became Taishang Huang and still remained in power until his death in 1194.Xiaozong
CH89205. Bronze 2 cash, Hartill 17.65, Schjoth 698, Fisher 1172, VF, dark near black patina, weight 7.229 g, maximum diameter 30.3 mm, 1163 - 1164; obverse Long Xing Yuan Bao, seal script; reverse plain; rare; $110.00 (93.50)


Kushan Empire, Kanishka I the Great, c. 127 - 150 A.D.

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The Kushan territories encompassed the Iranian-language speaking regions of Sogdiana, Ferghana, Bactria, Arachosia, Gandhara, and Taxila, and the conquered Indian territory of Mathura. These provinces lie in Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and northwestern Pakistan.
WA87808. Bronze tetradrachm, ANS Kushan 553 - 560, Gbl Kushan 781, Mitchiner ACW 3095, aVF, brown tone, well centered, scattered porosity, scratches, weight 16.931 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 0o, Kapisha main mint, probably Begram mint, c. 128 - 150 A.D.; obverse Bactrian inscription: AO KANHKI (King Kanishka), king standing facing, long beard, nimbate, diademed, wearing a round brimmed cap, knee length tunic, trousers and boots, sword in sheath on belt, sacrificing over altar left from right hand, vertical spear in left hand; reverse god Oesho (resembles Shiva) standing facing, four-arms, nimbate head left, hair in a topknot; holding attributes: diadem, thunderbolt, trident and water pot; tamgha left, Bactrian legend OHO on right; ex Tyche Numismatics; $100.00 (85.00)


Kushan Empire, Kanishka I the Great, c. 127 - 150 A.D.

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Nana was a female Kushan divinity from Bactria, a variation of pan-Asiatic Nana, a conflation of Sumero-Babylonian Inanna-Ishtar with a local divinity. Nana is first attested by name on a coin of Sapadbizes, a 1st century B.C. king of Bactria who preceded the Kushans. In this case, Nana is depicted as a lion. Nana reappears two centuries later on coins and seals of the Kushan kings, in particular of Kanishka I. She was typically depicted as a seated martial goddess, escorted by a lion. She was also associated with fertility, wisdom and as a goddess of the waters (in particular of the Indus River). Depictions of Nana are known from Afghanistan as late as the 5th - 6th century. In Afghanistan and Pakistan the name appears as "Nawi," the Pashto word for bride.
WA87810. Bronze tetradrachm, ANS Kushan 440 ff., Gbl Kushan 776, Mitchiner ACW 3091, VF, dark brown tone, edge crack, weight 15.625 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 0o, Kapisha main mint, probably Begram mint, c. 128 - 150 A.D.; obverse Bactrian inscription: AO KANHKI (King Kanishka), king standing facing, nimbate, diademed, wearing a round brimmed cap, knee length tunic, trousers and boots, sword in sheath on belt, sacrificing over altar left from right hand, vertical spear in left hand; reverse goddess Nana standing half right, nimbate, wearing diadem with long ties, and sleeved ankle length robe, hair with bun in the back, scepter topped with lion protome in right hand, bowl in left hand, Bactrian inscription NANA upward behind, tamga right; ex Moneta (Missouri Numismatic Society Bourse, July 2015); $100.00 (85.00)


China, Qing Dynasty, Sheng Zu, The Kangxi Emperor, 1662 - 1722

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The Kangxi Emperor is considered one of China's greatest emperors. According to tradition, while the Emperor Shen Zu was intimately associated with the European missionaries, he grew contempt for Buddhism and had a set of 18 brass images of the Luo-han Arhat (the 18 "vernerable" attendants of Buddha) melted down and cast into cash. The brass was said to contain a considerable portion of gold. Although analysis has shown that these coins do not contain any gold, great demand for these "Lohan cash" persists in China. Kangxi_Emperor
CH89209. Bronze cash, Lohan (venerable) cash; Hartill 22.91, Schjoth 1443, VF, weight 5.268 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, Board of Revenue mint, 1713 A.D.; obverse Kang Xi tong bao (one dot tong, Xi with no left down stroke); reverse Boo Chiowan, left and right; $90.00 (76.50)


Kushan Empire, Kanishka I the Great, c. 127 - 150 A.D.

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Oesho was a deity represented on the coins of several Kushan kings, one of the titular deities of the dynasty. Nearly all of the images of Oesho are on coins, suggesting his worship was a royal cult, not widely followed by the kings' subjects. Oesho was the only deity depicted on coins of Wima Kadphises, where he is portrayed with an erect lingam and is accompanied by a bull. Under Vasudeva I the iconography varied, with the god depicted with either two or four arms (holding a diadem, thunderbolt, trident and water pot), and one or three heads. The bull, water-pot, and trident became key attributes of Shiva in later Hindu art.
WA87812. Bronze tetradrachm, ANS Kushan 553, Gbl Kushan 781, Mitchiner ACW 3093, VF, excellent reverse detail, dark brown toning, earthen encrustations, obverse off center, edge crack, weight 16.644 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 0o, Kapisha main mint, probably Begram mint, c. 128 - 150 A.D.; obverse Bactrian inscription: AO KANHKI (King Kanishka), king standing facing, with a long beard, nimbate, diademed, wearing a round brimmed cap, knee length tunic, trousers and boots, sword in sheath on belt, sacrificing over altar left from right hand, vertical spear in left hand; reverse god Oesho (resembles Shiva) standing facing, four-arms, nimbate head left, hair in a topknot; wears bracelets, armlets and amulet string across chest; holding attributes: diadem, thunderbolt, trident and water pot; tamgha left, Bactrian legend OHO on right; ex ECIN; $70.00 (59.50)


China, Xin Dynasty, Wang Mang's Interregnum, 7 - 23 A.D.

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Wang Mang made multiple attempts at currency reform, almost entirely unsuccessful. The Huo Quan, a 5 shu coin, was introduced in his 5th reform in 14 A.D. Bing (cake or biscuit) is a Chinese term used to describe to any exceptionally heavy, thick and poorly finished varieties of "normal" coins. It is particularly appropriate for early Hou Quan types, among the thickest and heaviest of the circulating round coins of ancient China. Bing coins are sometimes described as a discus or pancake types. This is a medium-sized Bing, not quite as big as the earliest pieces, but about 3 times heavier than the common later Huo Quans. In 40 A.D. the coinage of Wang Mang was withdrawn, and the wu-shu resurrected. This medium "cake" type is very scarce or rare. Wang_Mang
CH89207. Brass 5 zhu, Bing (cake) thick Huo Quan (money coin); Gratzer-Fishman C5.2 (scarce - rare); Hartill 9.60 (rare), VF, dark blue-green patina, light encrustations, bump on reverse, casting rim around edge (as usual for the type), weight 12.926 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, c. 14 - 23 A.D.; obverse Huo Quan, interrupted vertical stroke of Quan, inner and outer rims; reverse plain, undated, inner and outer rims; very scarce or rare; $70.00 (59.50)


China, Northern Song Dynasty, Emperor Hui Zong, 1101 - 1126 A.D

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"Round as the heavens, square as the earth," is a Chinese saying used to metaphorically describe the fabric of the coins. On the practical side, it was discovered very early that a square hole fit a square shaft, which enabled a stacked quantity of coins to be turned on a lathe to remove casting irregularities.

The slender gold script was the personal calligraphy style of the Emperor Hui Zong.
Huizong
CH89211. Bronze 10 cash, Hartill 16.400, Schjoth 621, Fisher 1040, VF, lovely dark blue-green patina, weight 10.574 g, maximum diameter 34.7 mm, 1102 - 1106 A.D.; obverse Chong Ning tong bao, clockwise, slender gold script, bottom of Chong like he; reverse plain; $50.00 (42.50)


China, Northern Song Dynasty, Emperor Hui Zong, 1101 - 1126 A.D

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"Round as the heavens, square as the earth," is a Chinese saying used to metaphorically describe the fabric of the coins. On the practical side, it was discovered very early that a square hole fit a square shaft, which enabled a stacked quantity of coins to be turned on a lathe to remove casting irregularities.

The slender gold script was the personal calligraphy style of the Emperor Hui Zong.
Huizong
CH89212. Bronze 10 cash, Hartill 16.400, Schjoth 621, Fisher 1040, VF, attractive blue-green patina, light earthen deposits, weight 11.218 g, maximum diameter 34.4 mm, 1102 - 1106 A.D.; obverse Chong Ning tong bao, clockwise, slender gold script, bottom of Chong like he; reverse plain; $50.00 (42.50)


China, Warring States, Chu Kingdom, c. 476 - 221 B.C., Ghost Face Money

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This cowrie form is nicknamed Ant Nose Money and the specific type is nicknamed the Ghost Face Coin. The "face" is actually the characters "Gui Lian Qian." David Hartill notes, "They have been found in areas to the south of the Yellow River corresponding to the State of Chu in the Warring States period. One hoard was of some 16,000 pieces. Their weight is very variable, and their alloy often contains a high proportion of lead."
CH89397. Bronze cowrie, Hartill 1.4, Schjoth 15-17, Fisher 4, F, earthen encrustation, weight 2.223 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, c. 476 - 221 B.C.; obverse Gui Lian Qian (ghost face money); reverse plain; $50.00 (42.50)




  







Catalog current as of Thursday, April 18, 2019.
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Asian Coins