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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Military ▸ Arms and ArmorView Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Coins Featuring Arms and Armor

Thebes, Boiotia, c. 363 - 338 B.C.

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The largest city in Boeotia, leader of the Boeotian confederacy, and rival of Athens, Thebes sided with Persia during Xerxes' invasion in 480 B.C. Thebes ended Sparta's power of at the Battle of Leuctra in 371. The Sacred Band of Thebes famously fell to Philip II at Chaeronea in 338. After a revolt in 335, Alexander the Great destroyed the city, except, according to tradition, the house of the poet Pindar.
GS84245. Silver stater, BCD Boiotia 556; Hepworth 90; SNG Cop 325; Head Boeotia p. 66; BMC Central p. 84, 164, VF, toned, light bumps and marks, obverse a little off center, small obverse die cracks, weight 12.358 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, Thebes mint, magistrate Timo..., c. 363 - 338 B.C.; obverse Boeotian ox-hide shield; reverse ornate amphora, TI-MO divide across field below center, all within a round concave incuse; ex Jencek Historical Enterprise; $550.00 (€489.50)
 


Thebes, Boiotia, Greece, 405 - 395 B.C.

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The largest city in Boeotia, leader of the Boeotian confederacy, and rival of Athens, Thebes sided with Persia during Xerxes' invasion in 480 B.C. Thebes ended Sparta's power of at the Battle of Leuctra in 371. The Sacred Band of Thebes famously fell to Philip II at Chaeronea in 338. After a revolt in 335, Alexander the Great destroyed the city, except, according to tradition, the house of the poet Pindar.
GS74435. Silver tetartemorion, BCD Boiotia 466; BMC Central p. 77, 87; SNG Cop 294; Bérend Fractions 35; Head Boeotia 37, Choice VF, toned, weight 0.163 g, maximum diameter 6.4 mm, Thebes mint, 405 - 395 B.C.; obverse Boiotian ox-hide shield; reverse bunch of grapes on stem, Θ−E flanking above; ex BCD Collection; $320.00 (€284.80)
 


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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Adventus reverse types commemorate the emperor's arrival at Rome, either at the commencement of his reign or on his return from a distance. They may also refer to his arrival in some other city or province of the empire. At their accession, emperors were not conveyed in a chariot nor in any other vehicle, but went on horseback or on foot when they made their first public entry into the capital of the Roman world.
RA76334. Billon antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 904 (S); Cohen VI 69; Pink VI-1, p. 43; Hunter IV 311 var. (1st officina); cf. SRCV III 11195 (Rome mint, etc.), gVF, green patina with some silvering remaining, weight 4.393 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, 2nd officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 2nd emission, end 276 - beginning 277 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG, radiate, helmeted, and cuirassed bust left, spear in right hand over right shoulder, oval shield decorated with charging horseman on left arm; reverse ADVENTVS PROBI AVG, Probus on horseback left, raising right hand in salute, long scepter in left hand, horses' right foreleg raised over bound captive seated left, B in exergue; scarce; $280.00 (€249.20)
 


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 278, Probus defeated the Alamanni, expelled the Franks from Gaul, reorganized the defenses on the Rhine, resettled the Germanic tribes in the devastated provinces of the Roman Empire, and adopted the titles of Gothicus Maximus and Germanicus Maximus.
RA76279. Silvered antoninianus, Pink VI-1, p. 63; RIC, part 2, V 376 (S) var. (cuirass); Cohen VI 283 var. (same); Hunter IV 131 var. (same, and obv legend); SRCV III 11984 (same), Choice aEF, some mint luster, most silvering remains, fantastic heroic bust, light corrosion, weight 3.341 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 4 emission, 278 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG, radiate bust left from behind, spear left in right hand, back bare but for balteus over right shoulder and rectangular Aegis shield with square corner in on left shoulder; reverse HERCVLI PACIF, Hercules standing left, raising branch in extended right, club and Nemean Lion skin in left, VXXT in exergue; very rare; $260.00 (€231.40)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus II Gonatas, 277 - 239 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Most people expect the crests on ancient helmets to strictly run from front to back. Officer's helmets, however, frequently had a crest running from ear to ear, as on the helmet used as a control symbol on the reverse of this coin. The two ear flaps dangle below the bowl and visor of the helmet.
SH75314. Silver tetradrachm, Meydancikkale 618 (same obv. die); Mathisen, Administrative VI.1, obv. die A1; Price 629; Müller Alexander 233; SNG Cop -, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, centered, golden toning, test cut, light scratches and marks, lamination defect on reverse, weight 16.793 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 90o, Pella (or Amphipolis?) mint, c. 275 - 270 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, crested Macedonian officer's helmet facing on left, ΠAP monogram under seat strut, KE monogram in exergue; ex CNG auction 349, lot 35; $225.00 (€200.25)
 


Aitna, Sicily, The Kampanoi Mercenaries, c. 354 - 344 B.C.

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In 475 B.C. Hieron moved ten thousand settlers from Syracuse and Peloponnesus to Katane and renamed it Aetna. In 461, after Hieron's death, the new settlers were expelled. They moved to the southern slope of the volcano and founded a new Aetna. In 403 B.C., Dionysius the Elder made himself master of Aetna, where he settled his discharged Campanian mercenaries, the Kampanoi. The Kampanoi retained possession of Aitna until 339 B.C., when Timoleon took the city and put them to the sword. Under Rome, Aitna became a municipal town of considerable importance; its territory being one of the most fertile of all Sicily. The site of the city and time of its destruction are unknown today.
GI76936. Bronze AE 14, Calciati III, p. 327, 2; HGC 2 1608 (R1, Tauromenion); SNG Morcom 877 (340 - 330 B.C.); BMC Sicily p. 237, 4; SNG ANS -; SNG Cop -; SNG München -, VF, green patina, smoothing, weight 2.744 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 60o, Aitna (or Tauromenion?) mint, c. 354 - 344 B.C.; obverse Phrygian helmet with cheek guards, ornamented with a griffin, linear border; reverse KAM (Kampanoi) monogram in olive wreath; $195.00 (€173.55)
 


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D., EQVITI Series II of Ticinum, Q, SXXI

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Ticinum mint EQVITI series II - click EQVITI to read the NumisWiki article, Coins of Probus with Coded Markings of EQVITI Embedded in the mint mark. The letter Q in the reverse field is the second letter of the codeword EQVITI. The letter S in the exergue indicates this coin was struck by the second officina (mint workshop). The letters of the word EQVITI are coded in the mint marks of coins from all the officinae of the mint, with the specific letters of the codeword assigned to each officina in order corresponding with their officina numbers. This codeword probably refers to cavalry. It may be AEQVITI truncated because there were only six officinae in operation.
RA77126. Billon antoninianus, Cohen VI 488 (also with helmet); RIC V, part 2, 492 (R); Pink VI-1, p. 67/9; Hunter IV -, SRCV III -, Choice gVF, well centered and struck, much silvering, unusual obverse legend, weight 3.366 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, emission 9, 281 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI INVICTI AVG, radiate, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, spear in right hand over right shoulder, shield on left arm; reverse PROVIDENT AVG (the foresight of the Emperor), Providentia standing left holding globe in right hand, long transverse scepter in left hand, Q in left field, SXXI in exergue; rare; $170.00 (€151.30)
 


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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Adventus reverse types commemorate the emperor's arrival at Rome, either at the commencement of his reign or on his return from a distance. They may also refer to his arrival in some other city or province of the empire. At their accession, emperors were not conveyed in a chariot nor in any other vehicle, but went on horseback or on foot when they made their first public entry into the capital of the Roman world.
RA76277. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 166 (S); Cohen VI 69; Hunter IV 6; Pink VI-1, pp. 55; SRCV III 11953 var. (obv leg), aEF, magnificent armed bust, most silvering remaining, perfect centering, some corrosion, weight 4.183 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, emission 2, 277 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG, radiate, helmeted, and cuirassed bust left, spear in right hand over right shoulder, oval shield on left shoulder; reverse ADVENTVS PROBI AVG, Probus on horseback left, raising right hand in salute, long scepter in left hand, horses' right foreleg raised over bound captive seated left, R in exergue; scarce; $160.00 (€142.40)
 


Tisna, Aeolis, c. 350 - 300 B.C.

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GB68074. Bronze AE 10, Traité II 2074, pl. CLVII, 22; Klein 345 var. (head right); SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, SNG München -, BMC Troas -, Lindgren -, VF, weight 1.214 g, maximum diameter 10.3 mm, die axis 225o, Tisna mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse youthful head of river-god Tisnaios left; reverse sword in scabbard with strap, TIΣNA/ON (in two lines, one above, one below); very rare; $155.00 (€137.95)
 


Himera, Sicily, c. 472-413 B.C.

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In 409 B.C., Carthage attacked Himera. The city was unprepared; its fortifications weak. At first they were supported about 4000 auxiliaries from Syracuse, but their general, Diocles, seized with panic for the safety of Syracuse itself, abandoned Himera. The city was utterly destroyed, its buildings, even its temples, were razed to the ground. More than 3000 prisoners were put to death by General Hannibal Mago as a human sacrifice to the memory of his grandfather General Hamilcar who had been defeated at the Battle of Himera in 480 B.C.
GA76588. Silver obol, cf. SNG Cop 312; SNG München 355; SNG Lloyd 1027; BMC Sicily p. 81, 47; SNG ANS -; Klein -, VF, obverse off-center, reverse legend weak, uneven toning, a little rough, weight 0.586 g, maximum diameter 10.6 mm, Himera (Termini, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 472-413 B.C.; obverse bearded male (Kronos?) head right, wearing fillet (hair band); reverse HIMEPA (or similar), Corinthian helmet right, no crest, within shallow incuse; rare; $155.00 (€137.95)
 




  



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