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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Macedonia ▸ PhilippiView Options:  |  |  | 

Philippi, Macedonia

Philippi was established by Philip II of Macedonia on the site of the Thasian colony of Krinides. It was founded to take control of the neighboring gold mines and control the route between Amphipolis and Neapolis. Philip constructed fortifications to control the passage, sent colonists, and established a mint in the city. Philippi preserved its autonomy until it was fully integrated into the Macedonian Kingdom under Philip V. Mark Antony and Octavian defeated the assassins of Caesar, Marcus Junius Brutus and Cassius, at the Battle of Philippi in the plain to the west of the city in October 42 B.C. They released some of their veteran soldiers, probably from legion XXVIII, to colonize the city, which was refounded as Colonia Victrix Philippensium. In 30 B.C., Octavian reorganized the colony, and established more settlers there, veterans possibly from the Praetorian Guard and other Italians. The city was renamed Colonia Iulia Philippensis, and then Colonia Augusta Iulia Philippensis after January, 27 B.C., when Octavian received the title Augustus from the Roman Senate.


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Philippi, Macedonia

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Mark Antony and Octavian defeated the assassins of Caesar, Marcus Junius Brutus and Cassius, at the Battle of Philippi in the plain to the west of the city in October 42 B.C. They released some of their veteran soldiers, probably from legion XXVIII, to colonized the city, which was refounded as Colonia Victrix Philippensium. In 30 BC, Octavian became Roman emperor, reorganized the colony, and established more settlers there, veterans possibly from the Praetorian Guard and other Italians. The city was renamed Colonia Iulia Philippensis, and then Colonia Augusta Iulia Philippensis after January, 27 BC, when Octavian received the title Augustus from the Roman Senate.
RP77240. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 1656; Varbanov III 3770 (R4); BMC Mysia p. 103, 86 (Parium); SNG Cop IV 282 (same), gF, green patina, weight 4.887 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 0o, Philippi mint, obverse AVG, bare head right; reverse two priests with yoke of two oxen right, plowing the pomerium (sacred boundary), founding the new colony; $75.00 (63.75)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Philippi, Macedonia

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This reverse copies a type issued for Augustus. The statue of Julius Caesar is often described as crowning Augustus, but it seems clear on most specimens that both Augustus and Caesar are just raising their right hands in a salute. RPC identifies the figure behind as Genius Populi Romani(?), undoubtedly because the figure wears only a himation around his hips and legs. On the coin issued by Augustus, Caesar wears a toga.
RP83547. Bronze AE 26, RPC Online IV 4259 (4 spec., same dies as L 1958-3-4-92); AMNG III.2 p. 103, 18, pl. XX, 17 (rev. only); SNG Cop -; SNG ANS -; BMC Macedonia -, VF, green patina, obverse a little off-center, marks and scratches, corrosion, weight 10.650 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 180o, Philippi (near Filippoi, Greece) mint, 177 - 192 A.D.; obverse M COMMO ANT P FELIX AV BR, laureate head of Commodus right; reverse COL IVLIA AVG PHILIP, a statue of Augustus, on left, standing left in military dress and statue of Divi Julius Caesar (or Genius Populi Romani?) standing left behind him a himation around hips and legs, both raising right hand in salute, both statues on base inscribed DIVS (sic) / AVG in two lines; ex Gitbud & Naumann auction 36, lot 338; very rare; SOLD


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Philippi, Macedonia

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RPC notes, the mature portrait indicates this type was struck in the second half of Augustus' reign.
RP83474. Bronze AE 24, RPC I 1650, SNG Cop 283, SNG ANS 683, McClean 3269, Grant FITA 275, F, nice portrait, weight 11.562 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, Philippi (near Filippoi, Greece) mint, c. 9 B.C. - 14 A.D.; obverse COL AVG IVL PHILIVSSV, laureate head of Augustus right; reverse AVG DIVI F upward on left, DIVO IVL upward on left, three bases, on the larger middle base, a statue of Augustus, on left, standing left in military dress and statue of Divi Julius Caesar standing left behind him wearing a toga, both raising right hand in salute; SOLD







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REFERENCES

Bellinger, A. "Philippi in Macedonia" in ANSMN 11 (1964).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry & P. Ripolls. Roman Provincial Coinage I: From the death of Caesar to the death of Vitellius (44 BC-AD 69). (London, 1992 and suppl.).
Gaebler, H. Die antiken Mnzen von Makedonia und Paionia, Die antiken Mnzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. III. (Berlin, 1906).
Head, B. British Museum Catalogue of Greek Coins, Macedonia, etc. (London, 1879).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Moushmov, N. Ancient Coins of the Balkan Peninsula. (1912).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, USA, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society, Part 7: Macedonia 1 (Cities, Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, Paeonian kings). (New York, 1997).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Vol. III: Thrace (from Perinthus to Trajanopolis), Chersonesos Thraciae, Insula Thraciae, Macedonia. (Bourgas, 2007).

Catalog current as of Thursday, December 14, 2017.
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Philippi, Macedonia