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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Anatolia ▸ PamphyliaView Options:  |  |  |   

Pamphylia

Pamphylia, was a small region on the southern coast of Anatolia, extending about 120 km (75 miles) between Lycia and Cilicia, and north from the Mediterranean only about 50 km (30 miles) to mountainous Pisidia. The Pamphylians were a mixture of aboriginal inhabitants, immigrant Cilicians and Greeks who migrated there from Arcadia and Peloponnese in the 12th century B.C. The region first enters history in a treaty between the Hittite Great King Tudhaliya IV and his vassal, where the city "Parha" (Perge) is mentioned. Pamphylia was subdued by the Mermnad kings of Lydia; and afterwards passed in succession under the dominion of Persian and Hellenistic monarchs. After the defeat of Antiochus III in 190 B.C. they were annexed by the Romans to the dominions of Eumenes of Pergamum; but somewhat later they joined with the Pisidians and Cilicians in piracy, and Side became the chief center and slave mart of these freebooters. Pamphylia was for a short time included in the dominions of Amyntas, king of Galatia, but after his death were absorbed into a Roman province. The Pamphylians became largely Hellenized in Roman times, and have left magnificent memorials of their civilization at Perga, Aspendos and Side.


Tranquillina, Augusta, May 241 - 25 February 244 A.D., Alliance of Perga and Side, Pamphilia

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Perga was renowned for the worship of Artemis, whose temple stood on a hill outside the town, and in whose honor annual festivals were celebrated. Side's Temple of Apollo was located at the end of the city's peninsula site, overlooking the sea.
RP73194. Bronze AE 26, SNG Paris 500 (same dies), Franke-Nolle 1669 (same dies); BMC Lycia p. 142, 107, aVF, well centered, nice jade green patina, weight 11.610 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 0o, Perga mint, consular legate Tertullianus, May 241 - 25 Feb 244; obverse CΑΒΕΙ ΤΡΑΝΚVΛΛΕΙΝΑΝ CΕΒ, draped bust of Tranquillina right, crescent behind shoulders; reverse ΠΕΡΓΑΙΩΝ CΙ∆ΗΤΩΝ ΟΜΟΝΟΙΑ, Artemis of Perga on left, standing right, quiver over shoulder, long torch in left hand, clasping right hands with Apollo of Side, he is turning right, looking back left, long scepter in his left; $400.00 (€348.00)


Aspendus, Pamphylia, 195 - 194 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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After Alexander took Perga peacefully, Aspendos sent envoys to offer surrender if he would not take the taxes and horses formerly paid as tribute to the Persian king. Agreeing, Alexander went on to Side, leaving a garrison behind. When he learned they had failed to ratify the agreement their own evnvoys had proposed, Alexander marched to the city. The Aspendians retreated to their acropolis and again sent envoys to sue for peace. This time, however, they had to agree to harsh terms - they would host a Macedonian garrison and pay 100 gold talents and 4.000 horses annually.

When this coin was struck, Antiochos III the Great had recovered central Asia Minor for the Seleukid Kingdom. Aspendos accepted Seleukid authority in 197 B.C. The city surrendered to Rome in 190 B.C.
SH59525. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2897, SNG Cop 771, Cohen DCA 312, VF, weight 16.722 g, maximum diameter 31.3 mm, die axis 0o, Aspendos mint, 195 - 194 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; Seleukid countermark: anchor in roughly rectangular punch; reverse Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, AΣ / IH (year 18 Era of Aspendos) left; $260.00 (€226.20)


Aspendus, Pamphylia, 191 - 190 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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After Alexander took Perga peacefully, Aspendos sent envoys to offer surrender if he would not take the taxes and horses formerly paid as tribute to the Persian king. Agreeing, Alexander went on to Side, leaving a garrison behind. When he learned they had failed to ratify the agreement their own evnvoys had proposed, Alexander marched to the city. The Aspendians retreated to their acropolis and again sent envoys to sue for peace. This time, however, they had to agree to harsh terms - they would host a Macedonian garrison and pay 100 gold talents and 4.000 horses annually.

In 190 B.C., Aspendos, which had been under Seleukid rule, surrendered to the Romans.
SH59444. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2901, Müller Alexander 1214, Cohen DCA 312, VF, weight 16.227 g, maximum diameter 31.6 mm, die axis 0o, Aspendos mint, 191 - 190 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; Seleukid countermark: anchor in a rectangluar punch; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, right leg drawn back, eagle extended in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, wreath above AΣ / KB left (year 22 Era of Aspendos); $240.00 (€208.80)


Aspendus, Pamphylia, 188 - 187 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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After Alexander took Perga peacefully, Aspendos sent envoys to offer surrender if he would not take the taxes and horses formerly paid as tribute to the Persian king. Agreeing, Alexander went on to Side, leaving a garrison behind. When he learned they had failed to ratify the agreement their own evnvoys had proposed, Alexander marched to the city. The Aspendians retreated to their acropolis and again sent envoys to sue for peace. This time, however, they had to agree to harsh terms - they would host a Macedonian garrison and pay 100 gold talents and 4.000 horses annually.

At the time this coin was struck, the territory of Aspendos was surrounded by the Attalid's Pergamene Kingdom but retained independence.
SH59445. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2904, Müller Alexander 1217, Cohen DCA 312, gF, weight 15.885 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 0o, Aspendos mint, 188 - 187 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; Seleukid countermark: anchor in a rectangluar punch; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, eagle extended in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, wreath above AΣ / KE left (year 25 Era of Aspendos); $230.00 (€200.10)


Sillyon, Pamphylia, 3rd Century B.C.

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Sillyon was a relatively unimportant city but a significant fortress. According to one legend, it was founded as a colony from Argos; another holds that it was founded, along with Side and Aspendos, by the seers Mopsos, Calchas and Amphilochus after the Trojan War. Sillyon is first mentioned in c. 500 BC by Pseudo-Scylax. From 469 B.C., it became part of the Athenian-led Delian League. It is mentioned in the Athenian tribute lists from c. 450 B.C. and again in 425 B.C., and then disappears again from the historical record until 333 B.C., when Alexander the Great unsuccessfully besieged it. It was well-fortified and had a strong garrison of mercenaries and "native barbarians," so Alexander, pressed for time, abandoned the siege after the first attempt at storming it failed. The city was extensively rebuilt under the Seleucids, especially its theater. Later, when most of western Asia Minor was subject to the Kingdom of Pergamon, Sillyon remained a free city by a decision of the Roman Senate.
GB73951. Bronze AE 16, BMC Lycia p. 165, 1; Lindgren-Kovacs 1178; SNG BnF 952; SNGvA 4567 var (star over thunderbolt left), SNG Cop -, VF, weight 2.745 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 0o, Sillyon mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Ares right, wearing crested helmet; reverse ΣEΛYNIYΣ, Apollo(?) standing left, nude, right hand extended, rolled chlamys in left, thunderbolt in left field; rare; $165.00 (€143.55)


Side, Pamphylia, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Side was founded by Greeks from Cyme, Aeolis, most likely in the 7th century B.C. The settlers started using the local language and over time forgot their native Greek. Excavations have revealed inscriptions written in this language, still undeciphered, dating from as late as the 2nd century B.C. The name Side is from this indigenous Anatolian language and means pomegranate.
GB90296. Bronze AE 18, BMC Lycaonia p. 151, 70 (with same Helios countermark); SNG Cop 411 (same); SNG BnF 750 ff.; SNG PfPs 501; Lindgren -, VF, unusually broad flan with full legends, nice green patina, reverse flattened by countermarking, weight 2.667 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Side mint, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, in crested Corinthian helmet; countermarks: facing head of Helios, helmeted head of Athena right, ΣI∆HTΩN horizontal above; reverse Nike advancing left, holding wreath; wearing long chiton, peplos around waist and left arm, pomegranate in left field, ΣI∆H−TΩN horizontal above divided by Nike's head; ex Frascatius Ancient Coins; $120.00 (€104.40)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Perge, Pamphylia

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The monumental fountain or nymphaeum of Perga consists of a wide pool, and behind it a two-storeyed richly worked facade. From its inscription, it is apparent that the structure was dedicated to Artemis Pergaia, Septimius Severus, his wife Julia Domna, and their sons. An inscription belonging to the facade, various facade fragments, and marble statues of Septimius Severus and his wife, all found in excavations of the nymphaeum, are now in the Antalya Museum. Nymphaeum of Perge
RP69817. Bronze AE 18, SNG Cop 323 var (CEB), Lindgren A1108A var (same), SNG Pfälzer 317 var (same), SNG BnF -, BMC Lycia -, SGICV -, Nice aVF, weight 4.618 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Perga mint, obverse IOYΛIA ∆OMNA CE, draped bust right; reverse ΠEPΓAMΩN, Artemis standing right, wearing long chiton, hair in bun, arrow downward at side in right, bow in left; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; very rare; $95.00 (€82.65)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D., Pamphylia, Side

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In 25 B.C., Augustus placed Pamphylia and Side in the Roman province of Galatia. Side began another prosperous period as a commercial center through its trade in olive oil and slaves, and some piracy. Its population grew to 60,000 inhabitants. Wealthy merchants paid for public works, monuments, competitions, games, and gladiator fights. Most of the extant ruins at Side date from this period of prosperity which lasted well into the 3rd century A.D.
RP69824. Bronze AE 24, SNG Pfälzer 800, SNG BnF -, SNGvA -, SNG Cop -, BMC Lycia -, F, weight 9.178 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 195o, Side mint, 253 - 260 A.D.; obverse AV KA ΠO ΛI EΓ ΓAΛΛΛIHNOC CE, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust, from behind; reverse ΣI∆HTΩN, Apollo Sidetes standing facing, head left, wearing short chiton, chlamys, and boots, phiale in right hand, laurel tipped staff vertical behind in left; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; very rare; $80.00 (€69.60)


Philip II, July or August 247 - late 249 A.D., Perga, Pamphylia

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Perga was the capital of Pamphylia. Today it is a large site of ancient ruins, 15 kilometers (9.3 mi) east of Antalya on the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey. During the Hellenistic period, Perga was one of the richest and most beautiful cities in the ancient world, famous for its temple of Artemis. It also is notable as the home of the renowned mathematician Apollonius of Perga.
RP72630. Bronze AE 23, cf. SNG BnF 522; SNG Cop 349; SNGvA 4707; BMC Lydia p. 133, 65; SNG Pfälzer 397 (slight legend variations), F, weight 6.122 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 0o, Perga mint, as caesar, Feb 244 - Jul/Aug 247 A.D.; obverse AY K M IOY CEOY ΦIΛIΠΠOC C[E?], laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind, globe below bust; reverse ΠEPΓAIΩN, Tyche standing left, wearing kalathos, chiton and peplos, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left; scarce; $60.00 (€52.20)


Perga, Pamphylia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Perga was the capital of Pamphylia. Today it is a large site of ancient ruins, 15 kilometers (9.3 mi) east of Antalya on the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey. During the Hellenistic period, Perga was one of the richest and most beautiful cities in the ancient world, famous for its temple of Artemis. It also is notable as the home of the renowned mathematician Apollonius of Perga.Ruins of the main street in Perga
GB67176. Bronze AE 18, SNG BnF 355 - 361, Klein 619, SNG Cop 310 (2nd - 1st c. B,C), SNGvA 4649, BMC Lycia 15, aF, corrosion, weight 3.920 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Perga mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse sphinx seated right, curved wings, kalathos on head; reverse Pamphylian inscription: NANAΨAΣ / ΠPEIIAΣ, Artemis standing left, wearing short chiton and hunting boots, wreath in right, scepter vertical behind in left; $40.00 (€34.80)




  



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REFERENCES

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Catalog current as of Sunday, August 02, 2015.
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Pamphylia Coins