Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Byzantine Coins ▸ Heraclean DynastyView Options:  |  |  |   

Byzantine Coins of the Heraclean Dynasty

Byzantine Empire, Leontius, 695 - 698 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Leontius' success as a general forced the Arab Caliph Abd al-Malik to make concessions and pay tribute to Emperor Justinian II; but when war was renewed, Leontius was defeated. Furious over the loss, Justinian imprisoned him for two years. When he was freed, Leontius and his former prison comrades organized a revolt, and he took the throne. Justinian was deposed, his nose and tongue were slit and he was exiled to a monastery. After the Arabs took Carthage, the fleet Leontius sent to retake the city failed. Rather than report defeat to the emperor, the army overthrew their admiral and named Apsimar, a Germanic sailor, as their leader. Apsimar changed his name to Tiberius, returned to Constantinople, seized the thrown, cut off Leontius' nose and ears and exiled him to a monastery. In 705, Justinian II returned to Constantinople with an army of Bulgars and Slavs. Both Leontius and Tiberius were dragged through the streets in chains and beheaded.
SH83907. Gold tremissis, DOC II 4, SBCV 1333, Hahn MIB III 5, Sommer 15.3, Ratto 1731, Berk Gold 191, Morrisson BnF - (p. 417), VF, uneven strike, tight flan, graffiti obverse right field, weight 1.330 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople mint, 695 - 698 A.D.; obverse D LEO-N PE AV, bearded facing bust, wearing loros and crown with cross, globus cruciger in right hand; reverse VICTORIA AVSY S, cross potent on base, CONOB in exergue; from the Robert Watcher Collection, ex Heritage auction 3002 (Long Beach, Sep 2008), lot 2013 (sold for $747.50 plus fees); rare; $720.00 (612.00)


Byzantine Empire, Leontius, 695 - 698 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This half-follis of Leontius was first identified and published by S. J. Mansfield, in "A New Coin of the Byzantine Emperor Leontius" in Numismatic Circular, Nov 1999. It is otherwise unpublished and this is the second known specimen.
BZ73337. Bronze half follis, Mansfield, S. J., A New Coin of the Byzantine Emperor Leontius in Num. Circ., Nov 1999; DOC II part 2 -; Anastasi -, SBCV -, Hahn MIB III -, et al. -, F, rough green patina, weight 2.806 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, 695 - 696 A.D.; obverse half length bust facing with short beard, wearing crown with cross and loros with pelleted lozenge pattern, akakia in right, globus cruciger in left; reverse large K (40 nummi), cruciform Leontius monogram (Anastasi monogram 5) above, cross left, I (year 1) right, SCL in exergue; great rarity, 2nd known; $540.00 (459.00)


Constantine IV Pogonatus, 15 July 668 - 10 July 685 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Constantine IV Pogonatus should be credited with saving Europe from Muslim conquest. Beginning in 674, the great siege of Constantinople, by the caliph Muawiyah I, lasted four years. The newly invented famous "Greek Fire" made the city impregnable and the Arabs were forced to retreat. In 681 he deposed his two brothers. He was succeeded by his 16-year-old son Justinian II.
BZ84239. Bronze half follis, Anastasi 245, DOC II 67, Spahr 186, Hahn MIB III 112, SBCV 1214, Berk -, VF, green patina, rough, weight 2.566 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, 679 - 681 A.D.; obverse helmeted and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder; reverse large K, cross above, +AN-NO ∆ (year 4) flanking left and right; very rare; $400.00 (340.00)


Byzantine Empire, Heraclius & Heraclius Constantine, 23 January 613 - 11 January 641 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This coin is unusual and possibly unique because it was struck with small dies on a larger older coin, resulting in an appearance similar to countermarking. Other coins were struck in Sicily for Heraclius with countermark-like dies, but not with these types. This coin may have been struck under Constans II vice Heraclius.
SH68126. Bronze half follis, for Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine: cf. DOC II, part 1, 124; for Constans II and Constantine IV: cf. DOC II, part 2, 94, F, overstruck, obverse off-center, weight 3.329 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Syracuse (or Constantinopolis?) mint, obverse Heraclius (or Constans II?), on left, wearing military dress, long cross in right and akakia in left; Heraclius Constantine (or Constantine IV), on right (mostly off flan), wearing chlamys, globus cruciger in right; reverse large K (20 nummi), ANNO left, X[?] right, A below; unique(?); $200.00 (170.00)


Byzantine Empire, Constans II, September 641 - 15 July 668 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
 
BZ76312. Bronze half follis, DOC II part 2, 183; SBCV 1113; Spahr 120; Hahn MIB 212; Anastasi 118, VF, well centered on a ragged flan, nice green patina, scratches, weight 4.620 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, c. 650 - 651 A.D.; obverse facing bust with long beard, wearing chlamys, globus cruciger in right hand, cross surmounted by palm on right; reverse large Constans monogram , between A/N left and I (regnal year 1) right; very scarce; $120.00 (102.00)


Byzantine Empire, Constans II and Constantine IV, 13 April 654 - 15 July 668 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 665 the Arabs began a new invasion of North Africa. Resupplied by sea, the Byzantine were able to hold the coast and well-fortified Carthage for decades. In the spring of 698, however, the Arabs launched an assault by sea and land, forcing the Byzantines and their allies to evacuate Carthage. The Arabs burned the city to the ground, leaving the area desolate for the next two centuries. The Arab conquest of North Africa was then nearly complete.
BZ76424. Bronze follis, DOC II part 2, 147; Sommer 12.74; Wroth BMC 302; Tolstoi 372; Ratto 1632; Morrisson BnF 53; SBCV 1055, nice F, overstruck, slightly ragged flan, weight 6.849 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 45o, Carthage mint, 662 - 667 A.D.; obverse Constans (left) with long cross in right, and Constantine (right), both crowned and stand facing, cross between, trace of legend from undertype; reverse large M flanked by Heraclius (left) and Tiberius, both stand facing in crown and chlamys, monogram above, KTς below; scarce; $120.00 (102.00)


Sasanian Empire, Khusro II, Occupation of Egypt, 618 - 628 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
During his temporary domination of Egypt, 618 - 628 A.D., Khusru allowed the Alexandria mint to continue issuing the normal Byzantine coinage, but substituted his portrait for the Byzantine emperor's. The sun and moon replaced the obverse legend, just as on contemporary Sasanian coinage. It may seem strange that a Persian king would wear a crown surmounted by a cross; however, his wife Sira was a Christian, he was a benefactor of the church of St. Sergius in Edessa, he honored the Virgin, and he sometimes wore a robe embroidered with a cross which he had received as a gift from the Emperor Maurice Tiberius. The Byzantine emperors resumed the imperial coinage of Alexandria after their recapture of Egypt in 628 A.D.
WA77071. Bronze 12 nummi, DOC II, part 1, 191; Hahn MIB 202b; Wroth BMC 277; Tolstoi 109; Ratto 1316; Morrisson BnF 10/Al/AE/32; SBCV 855; Sommer 11.92, aVF, as-found slightly rough near black patina, well centered, weight 10.428 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Alexandria mint, 618 - 628 A.D.; obverse bust of the Sassanid King Khusru II wearing a crown with pendilia and surmounted by a cross, star left, crescent moon right; reverse large I B with cross potent on globe between, AΛEZ in exergue; from the J. Berlin Caesarea Collection, Caesarea Maritima surface find; $120.00 (102.00)


Byzantine Empire, Constans II, September 641 - 15 July 668 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 647, the first Muslim invasion of the Exarchate of Carthage was led by Abdallah ibn Sa'ad of the Rashidun Caliphate. Muslims defeated and killed the local Byzantine governor Gregory the Patrician at the Battle of Sufetula. The city, however, remained secure - for a while.
BZ77968. Bronze half follis, DOC II part 2, 144; Wroth BMC 321; Tolstoi 211; Ratto 1573; Morrisson BnF 29; Hahn MIB III 198a; SBCV 1059; Sommer 12.79 (none with leg. error), gF, reverse double struck, weight 5.509 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 225o, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, 647 - 659 A.D.; obverse D N CONS-TATNS (sic), bust of Constans II facing, with short beard, wearing consular robes and crown with trefoil ornament, mappa in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; reverse large cross, star flanked by a pellet on each side above, C-T (Carthage) over X-X (20 nummi) in two lines divided across field; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $80.00 (68.00)


Byzantine Empire, Constans II, September 641 - 15 July 668 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 647, the first Muslim invasion of the Exarchate of Carthage was led by Abdallah ibn Sa'ad of the Rashidun Caliphate. Muslims defeated and killed the local Byzantine governor Gregory the Patrician at the Battle of Sufetula. The city, however, remained secure.
BZ69718. Bronze half follis, DOC II part 2, 138.5; Wroth BMC 312; Tolstoi 205; Ratto 1568; Morrisson BnF 16; Hahn MIB 196a; SBCV 1057, aVF, weight 3.684 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 225o, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, 643 - 647 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS PP AV (AV ligate), beardless bust of Constans II facing, wearing chlamys and crown with cross on circlet, globus cruciger in right; reverse mark of value X X with large cross between, CRTG in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $70.00 (59.50)


Byzantine Empire, Heraclius & Heraclius Constantine, 23 January 613 - 11 January 641 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 614, a Sassanid Persian and Jewish army (26,000 men) led by by Shahrbaraz captured and sacked Jerusalem after a 20-day siege. Somewhere between 57,000 and 66,500 citizens were slain; another 35,000 were enslaved, including the Patriarch Zacharias. Many churches in the city (including the "Church of the Resurrection" or Holy Sepulchre) were burned, and numerous relics, including the True Cross, the Holy Lance, and the Holy Sponge, were carried off to the Persian capital Ctesiphon.
BZ77962. Bronze follis, DOC II part 1, 159b.4 (same dies); Morrisson BnF 10/Ni/AE/07; Wroth BMC 242; Tolstoi 270; Ratto 1436; Hahn MIB 175a; SBCV 834; Sommer 11.73, F, overstruck on a large flan, small edge cracks, strong undertype effects, weight 13.375 g, maximum diameter 31.2 mm, die axis 195o, 2nd officina, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 613 - 614 A.D.; obverse Heraclius on left, Heraclius Constantine on right, both stand wearing crown and chlamys with globus cruciger in right hand, cross between heads, obscure blundered legend; reverse large M (40 nummi) between A/N/N/O and II/II (regnal year 4), cross above, B (2nd officina) below, NIK (Nicomedia) in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $70.00 (59.50)




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Saturday, November 18, 2017.
Page created in 1.419 seconds.
Heraclean Dynasty