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Home>Catalog>RomanCoins>TheTetrarchy>LiciniusI PAGE 1/212»»»

Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

Licinius I was a comrade of emperor Galerius in the Tetrarchic period. Following the abdication of Diocletian and Maximianus, Licinius was raised to the rank of Augustus despite never having held the position of Caesar. After Maximinus II invaded his territories, Licinius marched against him and defeated him soundly. Over the next few years, relations between Licinius and Constantine I deteriorated. Armed conflict broke out several times and Licinius was defeated. Only through the intervention of Licinius' wife, Constantine's sister, was his life spared. However, shortly after he was executed for additional political machinations against Constantine.


Click for a larger photo In 318, Constantine the Great was given the title Brittanicus Maximus, for successful engagements in Britain. The details of the battles are unknown.
RL67754. Silvered AE 3, RIC VII Thessalonica 33, Choice gVF, most silvering remaining, weight 3.173 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 318 A.D.; obverse IMP LICINIVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse VOT XX / MVLT / XXX / •TS•A•, within wreath; scarce; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00

Click for a larger photo In 320 A.D., Licinius reneged on the religious freedom promised by the Edict of Milan, and began a new persecution of Christians in the Eastern Roman Empire. He destroyed churches, imprisoned Christians and confiscated their property.
RS65436. Silvered follis, RIC VII Cyzicus 9, Cohen 14, Choice EF, weight 3.435 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 135o, 7th officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 317 - 320 A.D.; obverse IMP LICI-NVS P F AVG, laureate consular bust left, mappa in right, globe and scepter in left; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, nude but for chlamys over left shoulder, crowned by Victory on globe in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, wreath left, Z right, SMK in ex; $135.00 SALE PRICE $122.00

Click for a larger photo In early in December 316, to ensure his loyalty, Licinius elevated Aurelius Valerius Valens, the dux limitis (duke of the frontier) in Dacia, to the rank of Augustus. According to Petrus Patricius, when Constantine learned of this "The emperor made clear the extent of his rage by his facial expression and by the contortion of his body. Almost unable to speak, he said, 'We have not come to this present state of affairs, nor have we fought and triumphed from the ocean till where we have now arrived, just so that we should refuse to have our own brother-in-law as joint ruler because of his abominable behavior, and so that we should deny his close kinship, but accept that vile slave [Valens] with him into imperial college.'" The treaty between Constantine and Licinius was concluded at Serdica on 1 March, 317. Whether it was part of that agreement is unknown, but Licinius had Valens executed.
RL50439. Silvered AE 3, RIC VII Alexandria 18, gVF, grainy areas, weight 3.870 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Alexandria mint, 316 - 317 A.D.; obverse IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, Victory on globe in right hand, long scepter vertical in left, eagle at feet, K left, wreath / X / A right, ALE in ex; much silvering remaining; $55.00 SALE PRICE $49.50

Click for a larger photo Open civil war between Constantine and Licinius broke in 316 when Constantine invaded Licinius' Balkan provinces. Licinius fled to Adrianople where he collected a second army, under the command of Valerius Valens whom he raised to the rank of Augustus. Constantine defeated Licinius at the Battle of Campus Ardiensis, but the victory was indecisive. A treaty between Constantine and Licinius was concluded at Serdica on 1 March, 317. The peace lasted for about seven years.
RB51649. Bronze AE 3, RIC VII Trier 121, EF, weight 3.829 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 0o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 316 A.D.; obverse IMP LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GENIO POP ROM, Genio standing left, patera in right, cornucopia in left, T left, F right, BTR in ex; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00

Click for a larger photo In 328 Arelatum (Arles, France) was renamed Constantina in honor of Constantine II. After Constantine II was killed in 340, the name reverted to Arelate, only to be changed again in 354 to Constantina by Constantius II. It retained that name, although the mintmark 'AR' appeared on some of its coins even in the fifth century. Dates of operation: 313 - 475 A.D. Mintmarks: A, AR, ARL, CON, CONST, KON, KONSTAN.
RL57878. Silvered AE 3, RIC VII Arles 240, gVF, weight 3.341 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Arelatum (Arles, France) mint, 321 A.D.; obverse IMP LICINIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse D N LICINI AVGVSTI, VOT / XX within wreath, S star in crescent A in ex; some inscription unstruck on reverse; $45.00 SALE PRICE $40.50

Click for a larger photo In 316, Constantine sent his half-brother Julius Constantius to Licinius at Sirmium, with the proposal to accept Bassianus as Caesar and to allow him to rule in Italy. Licinius refused, accused Bassianus of conspiracy and had him executed. Once again the rival emperors were at war. In early in December 316, Licinius elevated his own man, Aurelius Valerius Valens, the dux limitis (duke of the frontier) in Dacia, to the rank of Augustus. A treaty between Constantine and Licinius was concluded at Serdica on 1 March, 317. Whether it was part of that agreement is unknown, but Licinius had Valens executed.
BB70701. Bronze follis, RIC VII Siscia 17, VF, nice portrait, excellent centering, weight 3.481 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 45o, 2nd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 315 - 316 A.D.; obverse IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CON-SERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, nude but for cloak over shoulder, Victory on globe in right hand, long scepter vertical in left, eagle left with wreath in beak at feet on left, B right, •SIS• in ex; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; scarce (RIC R2); $35.00 SALE PRICE $31.50

Click for a larger photo Nicomedia was the Roman metropolis of Bithynia. Diocletian made it the capital of the Eastern Roman Empire in 286 when he introduced the Tetrarchy system. Nicomedia remained as the eastern (and most senior) capital of the Roman Empire until co-emperor Licinius was defeated by Constantine the Great at the Battle of Chrysopolis in 324. Constantine resided mainly in Nicomedia as his interim capital for the next six years, until in 330 when he declared the nearby Byzantium (renamed Constantinople) the new capital. Constantine died in his royal villa in the vicinity of Nicomedia in 337. Due to its position at the convergence of the Asiatic roads leading to the new capital, Nicomedia retained its importance even after the foundation of Constantinople.
RB48430. Bronze follis, RIC VII Nicomedia 13 var (not listed in RIC with star left), aVF, weight 5.232 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 30o, 3rd officina, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 313 - 317 A.D.; obverse IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, Victory on globe in right hand, long scepter vertical in left, star left, Γ right, SMN in ex; rare; $32.00 SALE PRICE $28.80

Click for a larger photo In Roman religion every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Roman People, etc. The legend GENIO AVGVSTI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the emperors, the Augusti. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RB57882. Bronze follis, RIC VI Antioch164a, F, green patina, weight 4.836 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, 6th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 312 A.D.; obverse IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, head of Sol in right hand, cornucopia in left, star left, S right, ANT in ex; $32.00 SALE PRICE $28.80

Click for a larger photo Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and the god of sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is therefore the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
BB70698. Bronze follis, RIC VII Siscia 8, gVF , scratches, weight 3.412 g, maximum diameter 21.09 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 313 - 315 A.D.; obverse IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CON-SERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, nude but for cloak over shoulder, Victory on globe offering wreath in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, eagle left with wreath in beak at feet on left, B right, SIS in ex; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $30.00 SALE PRICE $27.00

Click for a larger photo On 8 October 314, at the Battle of Cibalae, Constantine defeated Licinius near Colonia Aurelia Cibalae (modern Vinkovci, Croatia). Licinius was forced to flee to Sirmium, and lost all of the Balkans except for Thrace. The two Augusti initiated peace negotiations, but they failed and they would not make peace until 1 March 317.
BB70700. Silvered follis, RIC VII Nicomedia 13, VF, weight 2.907 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 45o, 2nd officina, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 313 - 317 A.D.; obverse IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CONS-ERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, Victory on globe offering wreath in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, eagle left with wreath in beak at feet on left, B right, SMN in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; scarce (RIC R2); $30.00 SALE PRICE $27.00



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Obverse legends:

IMPCLICLICINNIVSPFAVG
IMPCVALLICLICINIVSPFAVG
IMPCVALLICINLICINIVSPFAVG
IMPLICINIVSAVG
IMPLICINIVSPFAVG
IMPLICINIVSPIVSFELIXAVG
IMPLICLICINIVSPFAVG
LICINIVSAVGVSTVS
LICINIVSPFAVG
VALLICINNIANVSLICINNIVSPFAVG




Catalog current as of Tuesday, September 30, 2014.
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Roman Coins of Licinius I