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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Thrace & Moesia| ▸ |Chersonesos||View Options:  |  |  | 

Chersonesos, Thrace

Chersonesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Chersonesos. Chersonesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.

Kings of Bosporos, Polemo I, c. 14 - 9 B.C.

|Bosporan| |Kingdom|, |Kings| |of| |Bosporos,| |Polemo| |I,| |c.| |14| |-| |9| |B.C.|, |tetrachalkon|
The Bosporan Kingdom (or Kingdom of the Cimmerian Bosporus) was in eastern Crimea and the Taman Peninsula on the shores of the Cimmerian Bosporus, the present-day Strait of Kerch (it was not named after the Bosphorus beside Istanbul). The mixed population adopted Greek language and civilization. The prosperity of the kingdom was based on the export of wheat, fish and slaves. The kingdom's golden age was 2nd and 1st centuries B.C. At the end of the 2nd century A.D., King Sauromates II inflicted a critical defeat on the Scythians and expanded his state to include the entire Crimea. It was the longest surviving Roman client kingdom, lasting until it was overrun by the Huns c. 375 A.D.
GB85937. Bronze tetrachalkon, Frolova-Ireland p. 52, pl. 33/1, pl. 34/1-5, MacDonald Bosporus 229, SNG Stancomb 961, Anokhin 256, HGC 7 347 (R2), RPC I -, SNG BM -, SNG Pushkin -, nice VF, bold strike, slightly off center, attractive near black patina with buff earthen highlighting, scratches, edge cracks, countermark, weight 9.295 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 0o, Pantikapaion (Kerch, Crimea) mint, c. 14 - 9 B.C.; obverse head of gorgon Medusa (or Perseus? - most references say a gorgon) right, winged, snakes (or drapery) around neck, obscure round countermark before; reverse monogram of Polemo I; very rare; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00 ON RESERVE


Chersonesos, Thrace, c. 386 - 338 B.C.

|Chersonesos|, |Chersonesos,| |Thrace,| |c.| |386| |-| |338| |B.C.|, |hemidrachm|
Chersonesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Chersonesos. Chersonesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS89040. Silver hemidrachm, McClean II 4120; Weber 2432; BMC Thrace p. 186, 50; HGC 3.2 1437; SNG Cop -, Choice gVF, fine style, well centered, tiny edge cut, weight 2.370 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 270o, Cherronesos (Gallipoli peninsula) mint, c. 386 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet above X in one sunken quarter, kerykeion in the opposite sunken quarter; ex CNG e-auction 249 (9 Feb 2011), lot 34 (realized $320 plus fees); SOLD


Chersonesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

|Chersonesos|, |Chersonesos,| |Thrace,| |c.| |400| |-| |338| |B.C.|, |hemidrachm|
Chersonesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Chersonesos. Chersonesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
SH58544. Silver hemidrachm, McClean II 4117, Weber 2415, SNG Cop 830, HGC 3.2 1437, BMC Thrace -, VF, weight 2.318 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, Cherronesos (Gallipoli peninsula) mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, •VE ligature in one sunken quarter, salamander in the opposite sunken quarter; ex-Imperial Coins; SOLD







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REFERENCES|

Bloesch, H. Griechische Münzen In Winterthur. (Winterthur, 1987).
Corpus Nummorum Thracorum - http://www.corpus-nummorum.eu/
Demeester, A. Les animaux et la monnaie grecque. (Brussels, 2003).
Mildenberg, L. & S. Hurter, eds. The Dewing Collection of Greek Coins. ACNAC 6. (New York, 1985).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol. II: Macedon, Thrace, Thessaly, NW, central & S. Greece. (London, 1924).
Grose, S. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Fizwilliam Museum, Vol. II: The Greek mainland, the Aegean islands, Crete. (Cambridge, 1926).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints from the Lindgren Collection. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins from the Lindgren Collection. (Quarryville, 1993).
Moushmov, H. Ancient Coins of the Balkan Peninsula. (1912).
Murphy, B. The Coinage of Thracian Cherronesos, c. 400 - 350 B.C. - http://bpmurphy.ancients.info/chersonese/Cherronesos.htm
Poole, R. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thrace, etc. (London, 1877).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Austria, Klagenfurt, Landesmuseum für Kärnten, Sammlung Dreer, Part 3: Thracien - Macedonien - Päonien. (Klagenfurt, 1990).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain III, R.C. Lockett Collection, Part 2: Sicily - Thrace (gold and silver). (London, 1939).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain V, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, Part 9: Bosporus - Aeolis. (London. 2008).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain VII, Manchester University Museum. (London, 1986).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IX, British Museum, Part 1: The Black Sea. (London, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XI, The William Stancomb Collection of Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Oxford, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Italy, Milano, Civiche Raccolte Numismatiche, VI. Macedonia - Thracia, Part 3. (Milan, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Russia, State Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts: Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Leuven, Belgium, 2011).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Sweden: Sammlung Eric von Post. (Stockholm, 1995).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, United States, Burton Y. Berry Collection, Part 1: Macedonia to Attica. (New York, 1961).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume III: Thrace (from Perinthus to Trajanopolis), Chersonesos Thraciae, Insula Thraciae, Macedonia. (Bourgas, 2007).

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