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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Denominations ▸ Greek FractionsView Options:  |  |  |   

Greek Silver Fractions

Orthagoreia, Thrace, c. 350 - 330 B.C.

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All the references given, except SNG Cop, include Orthagoreia in Macedonia. See Psoma Maroneia, pp. 193204, for the redesignation of Orthagoreia from Macedon to Thrace.
SH86789. Silver hemidrachm, SNG ANS 7.1 564 (same dies); SNG Cop 690; SNG Ashmolean V.2 2356; AMNG III-2, 3; BMC Macedonia p. 88, 5; HGC 3.1 600 (R1), Choice aEF, attractive style, well centered, nice toning, slight porosity, weight 2.571 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 15o, Orthagoreia mint, c. 350 - 330 B.C.; obverse facing head of Artemis, facing slightly left,, wearing triple-drop earring and pearl necklace, quiver on left shoulder; reverse OΠΘAΓO−ΠEΩN, facing ornate Macedonian helmet with cheek pieces, and star ornament crest; scarce; $700.00 (595.00)


Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 454 - 404 B.C., Old Style Drachm

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Struck during Athens' Golden Age, a time when great thinkers, writers, and artists flourished in the city. Herodotus, the father of history, lived and wrote in Athens. Socrates, the father of philosophy, taught in the marketplace. Hippocrates, the father of medicine, practiced there. The sculptor Phidias created his great works for the Parthenon on the Acropolis and the Temple of Zeus at Olympia. Democritus envisioned an atomic universe. Aeschylus, Euripedes, Aristophanes, and Sophocles wrote their famous plays and Pindar his Odes. This legacy would continue as, later, Plato would found his Academy outside the walls of Athens in 385 B.C. and, later, Aristotle would found his Lyceum in the city center.
GS86581. Silver drachm, SNG Cop 41; Kroll 10; Dewing 1601; Svoronos pl. 11, 20; HGC 4 1631, VF, well centered and struck, die wear, porosity, weight 4.153 g, maximum diameter 14.5 mm, die axis 270o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves & floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair across forehead in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, to left olive sprig and crescent, all within incuse square, AΘE downward on right; scarcer denomination; $450.00 (382.50)


Syracuse, Sicily, Hieron II, 275 - 215 B.C.

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References disagree on the date of this type. Dates range from the rule of Hieron II beginning in 275 B.C. to the end of the 5th Republic in 212 B.C.
GS86619. Silver 2 1/2 litrae, SNG Cop 882, SNG ANS 903, SNG Mnchen 1439, HGC 2 420 (R2) corr., BMC Sicily -, VF, well centered, toned, light bumps and marks, ethnic weakly struck, weight 2.229 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, 216 - 215 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo left; reverse ΣYPAKOΣIOI, Isis standing facing, looking up to heaven, veil billowing out behind around head, scroll in right hand, filleted palm frond in left hand, A upper right; very rare; $400.00 (340.00)


Thracians, Odrysian Kingdom, Kotys I 384 - 359 B.C.

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Soon after he became king, Kotys allied with Athens and married his daughter to the Athenian general Iphicrates, who became his second in command. With the help of Iphicrates, Kotys expanded his kingdom, but his success led to increasing tensions with Athens. The Second Athenian Confederacy was founded as a safeguard against Kotys. In 365 B.C., Kotys went to war with the Athenians for the Thracian Chersonese. Around this time, Kotys' treasurer Miltokythes rebelled. Iphicrates and Kotys' mercenary commander Charidemus bribed the Athenian commanders to help suppress the rebellion. In 361 B.C., Charidemus returned to Athens with a treaty from Kotys, proclaiming him an ally. By 360 B.C., Kotys controlled the whole Chersonese peninsula. Late Sep. 360 B.C., Kotys was murdered by two of Platos students, Python and Heraclides. Advisers to the King, they murdered him under the pretext that he had wronged their father. In Athens, they were proclaimed honorary citizens and rewarded with gold wreaths.

Kypsela, Thrace, was located in the region between the river Nestos to the river Hebros.
GS86792. Silver diobol, Winzer 31.3; SNG Ashmolean 3719; Topalov 96; Peter p. 114 var. (KO/T-Y and no ivy leaf), gVF, toned, light marks, slightly grainy/porous, weight .0793 g, maximum diameter 11.3 mm, die axis 0o, Kypsela mint, 384 - 359 B.C.; obverse bare head left, with beard and moustache; reverse two-handled vessel (Odrysian dynastic symbol?), KO above, ivy leaf right; very rare; $300.00 (255.00)


Lampsakos, Mysia, c. 500 - 450 B.C.

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Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth.
GA86592. Silver diobol, Baldwin Lampsakos, group A, type I, pl. V, 8; AMNG III 14; SNGvA 7390; SNG BnF 1126; SNG Ashmolean 653; SNG Cop 184; Rosen 524; SGCV II 3879, EF, well centered, dark toning, a few light marks, reverse die damaged, weight 1.230 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 500 - 450 B.C.; obverse janiform female heads, each wearing stephanos, with central earring; reverse head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet, within incuse square; $250.00 (212.50)


Phaselis, Lycia, 500 - 466 B.C.

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Partial brockage obverse. The obverse was re-struck off-center over a brockage of the reverse, leaving two clear impressions.
GA83588. Silver tetrobol, SNGvA 4396, SNG Berry 1200 var. (ΦA above galley, Σ below), SNG Cop -, SNG Fitzwilliam -, VF, toned, tight flan, die wear, die cracks, partial brockage, weight 3.507 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 90o, Phaselis mint, 500 - 440 B.C.; obverse prow of war galley right in the form of a boar's forepart, partial brockage with incuse letters ΦA visible on obverse; reverse stern right, ΦAΣ above, all in incuse square; ex Roma Numismatics, e-sale 21 (31 Oct 2015), 368; $180.00 (153.00)


Maroneia, Thrace, c. 398 - 385 B.C.

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Maroneia was on the Aegean coast about midway between the mouths of the Hebrus and the Nestus rivers. The city was named after Maron, sometimes identified as a son of Dionysos, who in the Odyssey gives Odysseus the wine with which he intoxicates Polyphemos. Maroneia was famous for its wine, which was esteemed everywhere and was said to possess the odor of nectar.
GB85193. Silver triobol, Schnert-Geiss Maroneia 236 ff.; SNG Cop 616; SNG Delepierre 797; BMC Thrace p. 234, 30a, gF/VF, tight flan, edge cracks, weight 2.624 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 90o, Maroneia (Maroneia-Sapes, Greece) mint, c. 398 - 385 B.C.; obverse forepart of prancing horse left, dotted body truncation, A-N flanking at neck, Θ below; reverse bunch of grapes on a vine, M - A flanking low across the field, all in a dotted linear square border within a square incuse; $180.00 (153.00)


Chersonesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

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Chersonesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Chersonesos. Chersonesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS86502. Silver hemidrachm, SNG Cop 842; BMC Thrace p. 183, 14 var. (wreath vice trilobe); SNG Ashmolean 3589 var. (same); McClean 4073 ff. var. (rosette vice trilobe), VF, toned, some bumps and marks, weight 2.299 g, maximum diameter 13.4 mm, die axis 0o, Chersonesos mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding, fore-paws raised; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet (control symbol) in one sunken quarter, pellet within trilobe (flower?, control symbol) in the opposite sunken quarter; $180.00 (153.00)


Olynthos, Chalkidian League, Macedonia, 420 - 348 B.C.

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In 432 B.C. Olynthos broke away from Athens and, with several other cities, formed the Chalkidian league. In 393, Amyntas III of Macedonia temporally transferred territory to Olynthos when he was driven out of Macedonia by Illyrians. When he was restored and the league did not return his lands, he appealed to Sparta. Akanthos and Apollonia, also appealed to Sparta, claiming league membership was not voluntary but enforced at the point of a sword. After a long war, in 379 these cities were made "autonomous" subject allies of Sparta. Weakened by the division, the league was destroyed by Philip II of Macedon in 348 B.C.
SH64053. Silver tetrobol, Robinson-Clement group D, 38 (same dies); Trait pl. 313, 10; SNG ANS -; SNG Cop -; BMC Macedonia -, VF, weight 2.043 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, Olynthos mint, c. 420 - 348 B.C.; obverse OΛYNΘ (counter-clockwise), laureate head of Apollo left; reverse XAΛKI∆EΩN, kithara with eight strings, squared legend around, all within a shallow incuse square; scarce; $170.00 (144.50)


Eion, Macedonia, c. 500 - 480 B.C.

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Published examples of this type are about twice the weight of this coin and identified as diobols and trihemiobols. Our coin might be an underweight diobol or trihemiobol, but the weight is closer to an obol.

Eion was only about 3 miles from Amphipolis and after the 5th century was merely a seaport of its large neighbor. The denomination is either a diobol or trihemiobol. The significance of the obverse type is not clear, but presumably makes reference to the characteristic fauna of the region at that time.
GS86791. Silver diobol, SNG Cop 175; SNG ANS 277; BMC Macedonia p. 73, 5, VF, centered, porosity, edge crack, weight 1.033 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, die axis 0o, Eion mint, c. 500 - 480 B.C.; obverse goose standing right, left leg raised, head turned back, lizard left above; reverse mill-sail incuse square; $170.00 (144.50)




  



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Catalog current as of Thursday, June 21, 2018.
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Greek Fractions