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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Ares or Mars||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ares or Mars

God of war and bloodshed. Symbols include the boar and the spear. Son of Zeus and Hera.


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

|Marcus| |Aurelius|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars was a father (pater) of the Roman people. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RB92449. Silver denarius, RIC III AP1322 (S), BMCRE IV AP1983, Hunter II 79, SRCV II 4842, Cohen III -, VF, excellent portrait, dark blue-green patina, areas of light corrosion, weight 12.789 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 154 - 155 A.D.; obverse AVRELIVS CAESAR AVG PII FIL, bare head, draped bust right; reverse TR POT VIIII COS II, Mars advancing right, nude but for helmet and cloak tied on belt, transverse spear in right hand, trophy of arms in left hand over left shoulder; from the Errett Bishop Collection; no sales of the type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; rare; $240.00 SALE |PRICE| $216.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Mars was the god of war and also an agricultural guardian. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RS94107. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 320, RSC II 1072, BMCRE III 111, Hunter II 59, Strack II 95, SRCV II 3516 var. (slight drapery), VF, nice portrait, tight flan, flan cracks, weight 2.890 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 121 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, drapery on far shoulder; reverse P M TR P COS III, Mars advancing right, helmeted, nude but for cloak tied around waist, transverse spear in right hand, trophy in left across shoulder; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 82 (6 Oct 2019), part of lot 1070; $175.00 SALE |PRICE| $158.00


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.

|Severus| |Alexander|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.|, |sestertius|
In 231, Severus Alexander accompanied his mother Julia Mamaea to Syria and campaigned against the Persians. Military command rested in the hands of his generals, but his presence gave additional weight to the empire's policy. The Romans were defeated and withdrew to Syria. After heavy losses on both sides, a truce was signed accepting the status quo. In 233, Alexander celebrated a triumph in Rome to commemorate his "victory."
RB89054. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 635, BMCRE VI 843, Cohen IV 163, Hunter III 163, SRCV II 7979, VF, dark patina, centered on an oval flan, small edge cracks, slight double strike, weight 20.911 g, maximum diameter 33.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 231 - 235 A.D.; obverse IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG, laureate,draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse MARS VLTOR (Mars the avenger), Mars advancing right in military garb, spear transverse in right hand, shield in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; ex John Jencek; $160.00 SALE |PRICE| $144.00


Volusian, c. November 251 - July or August 253 A.D.

|Volusian|, |Volusian,| |c.| |November| |251| |-| |July| |or| |August| |253| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars was a father (pater) of the Roman people. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RS92352. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 219 (R), RSC IV 60, SRCV III 9755, Hunter III - (p. cix), gVF, broad flan, toned, porous, light deposits, weight 4.142 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 195o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 251 - 252 A.D.; obverse IMP C C VIB VOLVSIANVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse MARTEM PROPVGNATOREM (Mars the defender), Mars striding right, wearing crested helmet and military garb, transverse spear in right hand, oval shield on left arm; rare; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.

|Severus| |Alexander|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Mars was the god of war and also an agricultural guardian. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RS91592. Silver denarius, RSC III 208a, BMCRE VI 27, Hunter III 5, RIC IV 7, cf. SRCV 7890 (Antioch, star rev. field), gVF, attractive old collection toning, flow lines, off center, light marks, edge cracks, weight 2.499 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, Mar 222 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M TR P COS P P, Mars standing facing, head left, olive branch in extended right hand, reversed spear in left hand; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars was a father (pater) of the Roman people. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RA73268. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 844 (S), Webb 940, Hunter IV -, SRCV IV -, aF, well centered, nice green patina, weight 3.971 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain British mint, c. mid 286 - 287; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P AVG, radiate and draped bust right, early reign "moustache" portrait; reverse MARS VICTOR (Mars the Victor), Mars walking right, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over shoulder in left, no field marks, nothing in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; scarce; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Galerius, 1 March 305 - 5 May 311 A.D.

|Galerius|, |Galerius,| |1| |March| |305| |-| |5| |May| |311| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
In 294, Galerius, caesar in the Balkans, proved his worth campaigning on the Danube frontier, fighting the Goths, Marcomanni, Sarmatians, and Carpi. Galerius was assigned the job of land reclamation and repopulation, moving the entire tribe of the Carpi to settlements within the Roman Empire.
RA92335. Billon antoninianus, Bastien XI 657 (9 examples), RIC V-2 Lugdunum 692 (C), SRCV IV 14317, Cohen VI 211, Hunter IV -, VF, well centered, traces of silvering, flow lines, bumps and marks, scattered mild porosity, weight 4.222 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 0o, officina 2, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, as caesar, 294 A.D.; obverse MAXIMIANVS NOB C, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVGG (valor of the two emperors), Mars standing slightly left, head left, wearing helmet and military garb, resting right hand on grounded shield, inverted spear in left hand, B in exergue; RIC V lists as common but market evidence indicates they type is at least scarce; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

|Probus|, |Probus,| |Summer| |276| |-| |September| |282| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Virtus applied exclusively to a man's behavior in the public sphere, that is to the application of duty to the res publica in the cursus honorum. Private business was no place to earn virtus, even when it involved courage or feats of arms or other good qualities. There could be no virtue in exploiting one's manliness in the pursuit of personal wealth, for example. It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
RA84026. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V-2 816; SRCV III 12071 var. (...P F AVG); Cohen VI 894; Hunter IV -, Choice EF, full silvering, full circles centering, some flatly struck areas, weight 3.888 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, emission 5, 278 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS P AVG, radiate bust left in consular robe, eagle-tipped scepter in right hand; reverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG (the valor of Emperor Probus), Mars walking right, helmeted, nude but for cloak tied in belt at waist and flying behind, transverse spear upward right in right hand, trophy of captured arms over left shoulder in left hand, XXIV in exergue; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Virtus applied exclusively to a man's behavior in the public sphere, that is to the application of duty to the res publica in the cursus honorum. Private business was no place to earn virtus, even when it involved courage or feats of arms or other good qualities. There could be no virtue in exploiting one's manliness in the pursuit of personal wealth, for example. It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
RA73256. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 1172, RIC V-2 1040 (R), Hunter IV -, SRCV IV -, Burton Latimer -, Bicester -, F, green patina, obverse slightly off center, earthen deposits, scratches, weight 2.586 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 225o, unmarked mint, c. mid 286 - 287; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVG (courage of the Emperor), Virtus (or Mars) standing right, helmeted and draped, spear vertical in left hand, right hand resting on large grounded shield, no mint marks; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; rare; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

|Probus|, |Probus,| |Summer| |276| |-| |September| |282| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
In 280, Proculus, a Roman usurper, started a rebellion at Lugdunum (Lyon, France) and proclaimed himself emperor. Probus suppressed the revolt and Proculus was executed.
RA87905. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 84; SRCV III 11992; Cohen VI 334; Pink p. 68, series 3; Hunter IV 85 var. (2nd officina), Choice VF, traces of silvering, porosity, weight 3.365 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 277 A.D.; obverse IMP C M PROBVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, drapery on left shoulder; reverse MARS VICTOR (Mars the Victor), Mars advancing right, nude but for helmet, chlamys and boots, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over shoulder in left, III in exergue; ex Beast Coins; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00




  



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Catalog current as of Friday, February 28, 2020.
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Ares or Mars