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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Types| ▸ |Grapes & Wine||View Options:  |  |  | 

Grapes and Wine on Ancient Coins

Coins related to grapes and wine are popular. Of course, we also include in this theme coins depicting the gods of wine - Dionysus, Bacchus, and Liber.

Roman Bronze Vessel Handle, Ornamented With Bacchus and a Panther, c. 1st Century A.D.

|Roman| |Antiquities|, |Roman| |Bronze| |Vessel| |Handle,| |Ornamented| |With| |Bacchus| |and| |a| || |Panther,| |c.| |1st| |Century| |A.D.|,
The Panther was the companion of Bacchus. The grapevine and its wild barren alter-ego, the toxic ivy plant, were both sacred to him. This handle was once attached to vessel used for serving or drinking wine.
AI30971. height 8.0 cm (3"), excellent condition with a nice green patina, bronze vessel handle ornamented with a facing young head of Bacchus wearing an ivy wreath in his long flowing hair, panther skin tied at neck, the curving handle ends with a panther head; $350.00 SALE |PRICE| $315.00


Dikaia, Macedonia, 5th Century B.C.

|Other| |Macedonia|, |Dikaia,| |Macedonia,| |5th| |Century| |B.C.|, |hemiobol|
The referenced Pecunem Gitbud & Naumann coin is very similar, but from different dies. The referenced VAuctions coin, presumably a later issue, is also very similar but with ∆IKAI and a dotted square border around the grapes within a shallower square incuse. Dikaia was located between the rivers Nestos and Hebros.
GS92899. Silver hemiobol, Apparently unpublished in the standard references; Gitbud & Naumann auction 11 (29 Dec 2013), lot 89; cf. VAuctions 270, lot 112 (see notes), VF, well centered on an irregularly shaped flan, toned, earthen deposits, reverse flatly struck, weight 0.295 g, maximum diameter 7.5 mm, die axis 180o, Dikaia mint, 5th century B.C.; obverse head of lion right; reverse bunch of grapes on stem within incuse square; extremely rare; $200.00 SALE |PRICE| $180.00


Byzantine, Transjordan (Northern Israel or Jordan), "Elongated" Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 500 - 650 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Byzantine,| |Transjordan| |(Northern| |Israel| |or| |Jordan),| |"Elongated"| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |500| |-| |650| |A.D.|,
This type is identified by Adler as a Transjordan elongated lamp. Adler writes that the shoulders are narrow and ornamented with a wide variety of motifs including linear bands, geometric, and floral designs; the handle is tongue shaped projecting horizontally and decorated with three or more bands; the nozzle is decorated with geometric or floral designs or rarely a cross. The type is found in the northern part of Transjordan, and in Israel, mainly in northern Israel and the Beit Shean area. They date possibly as early as the fifth century, mostly to the sixth century and extending into the first half of the seventh century. In the Hellenistic and Roman eras Beit Shean was the Decapolis city Scythopolis. Click the photo on the right of the ancient ruins at Beit Shean, to learn more about the city. Scythopolis
AL93937. Transjordan elongated lamp; Adler type JOR.1, cf. 971 (slightly larger, very similar ornamentation); 8.9 cm (3 1/2") long, Choice, complete and intact, c. 500 - 620/650 A.D.; pink clay, mold made, elongated body, tongue shaped handle rising diagonally ornamented with three vertical bands, double rim around large filling hole, radiating bands on convex shoulders, dots and lines (grapes on vine) on nozzle; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00


Kios, Bithynia, c. 325 - 203 B.C.

|Bithynia|, |Kios,| |Bithynia,| |c.| |325| |-| |203| |B.C.|, |AE| |11|
According to myth, Kios (Cius) was founded on the Propontis (Sea of Marmara) by Herakles when he accompanied the Argonauts. According to historians, it was founded in 626 - 625 B.C. by colonists from Miletos. Kios was often subject to greater powers, predominantly the Persian Empire until Alexander the Great invaded and took the city in 334 B.C. After disputes with Alexander's successors, Kios joined the Aetolian League, in opposition to Macedonia. In 202 B.C., Philip V of Macedonia and Prusias I of Bythinia destroyed the city and massacred, banished, or enslaved its citizens. Prusias built a new city on the site and named it for himself (Prusias ad Mare). After this atrocity, the Rodians asked the Roman Senate for help. The Romans seized this opportunity to invade Greece and defeat Philip V. In 74 B.C., after the death of King Nikomides III, the Romans occupied Kios and the whole of Bythinia. Under Rome, the name Kios was revived. An important link in the ancient Silk Road, Kios became a wealthy town.
GB89135. Bronze AE 11, SNG Cop 382; BMC Pontus, p. 131, 20; var. (KIA); SNGvA 7004 var. (same); Rec Gn I.2 7 var. (same), VF, nice dark green patina, weight 1.020 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 0o, Kios (Bursa, Turkey) mint, c. 325 - 203 B.C.; obverse young beardless male head (Mithras?) right, wearing a Phrygian cap and laurel wreath; reverse Kantharos between two bunches of grapes hanging on vines which emerge from the cup, K-I divided by stem, all within wreath of two stalks of grain; rare; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Maroneia, Thrace, c. 150 - 100 B.C.

|Maroneia|, |Maroneia,| |Thrace,| |c.| |150| |-| |100| |B.C.|, |AE| |25|
Maroneia was on the Aegean coast about midway between the mouths of the Hebrus and the Nestus rivers. The city was named after Maron, sometimes identified as a son of Dionysos, who in the Odyssey gives Odysseus the wine with which he intoxicates Polyphemos. Maroneia was famous for its wine, which was esteemed everywhere and was said to possess the odor of nectar.
MA95722. Bronze AE 25, BMC Thrace p. 130, 74; Schnert-Geiss 1434 ff.; SNG Cop 643 var. (monogram), F, green patina, porous, a few marks/scratches, weight 13.577 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 0o, Maroneia (Maroneia-Sapes, Greece) mint, c. 150 - 100 B.C.; obverse head of young Dionysos right, wearing band across forehead, and ivy wreath; reverse ∆IONIΣOY ΣΩTHPOΣ MAPΩNITΩN, Dionysos standing left, nude but for chlamys on left arm, bunch of grapes in right hand, two stalks of narthex in left hand, P∆Y monogram inner left; $12.34 (11.35)







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