Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Persia & MesopotamiaView Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Coins of Persia and Mesopotamia

Also included on this page are coins minted under Persian rule in other regions of the Persian Empire.


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos III Keraunos, 226 - 223 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Seleucus III Soter proved not to be the "Savior" that his official royal epithet advertised; nor did live up to his nickname Keraunos - "Thunder." He failed to reclaim western Asia Minor from his cousin, Attalus of Pergamum, and was assassinated after only a brief reign of only a few years.
GS86617. Silver drachm, Houghton-Lorber I 933, Newell WSM 1327, Weber 7867, Hoover Syrian 418 (R3), gVF, superb portrait, light toning, light bumps and marks, reverse double struck with a worn damaged die, weight 4.056 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Northern Syria or Northern Mesopotamia, uncertain mint, 226 - 223 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Seleukos III with long sideburns; reverse Apollo seated left on omphalos, examining arrow in right hand, resting left hand on grounded bow, BAΣIΛEWS (downward on right) S (δοωνωαρδ ον ριγητ) Σ</θwnward on right) SEΛEYKOY (downward on left), AP monogram (control) left, monogram (control) right; very rare; $1200.00 (€1020.00)
 


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Artaxerxes II - Darius III, c. 375 - 340 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This type was minted in Lydia, Anatolia, while under Persian control, prior to Alexander the Great's conquest. The Persian or Achaemenid Empire (c. 550 - 330 B.C.) was the largest empire in ancient history extending across Asia, Africa and Europe, including Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of Central Asia, Asia Minor, Thrace and Macedonia, much of the Black Sea coastal regions, Iraq, northern Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Palestine and Israel, Lebanon, Syria, and much of ancient Egypt as far west as Libya.Persian Empire

GA86615. Silver siglos, Carradice Type IV (late) C, 46 ff.; BMC Arabia 172 ff.; SNG Kayhan 1031; SGCV II 4683; Rosen 674; Klein 763; Carradice Price p. 77 and pl. 20, 387 ff., aVF, unusual facing head banker's mark, weight 5.376 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 375 - 340 B.C.; obverse Kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, bearded, crowned, dagger in right hand, bow in left hand; reverse irregular oblong punch; $380.00 (€323.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Seleucus I as Satrap, 328 - 311 B.C., Babylon, Babylonia

Click for a larger photo
After the Persian satrap Mazaios surrendered Babylon to Alexander without a fight, Alexander retained him as governor. Alexander made Babylon his royal seat and established a mint to strike "Alexandrine" coinage, including massive quantities of his tetradrachms with a bust of Herakles on the obverse and Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned on the reverse. Alexandrine coinage was struck at many mints and circulated across Alexander's empire. At the same time, Babylon also struck local civic coinage, some in the name of Mazaeus. After Mazaeus death in 328 B.C., the satrap Seleukos I continued to strike local types in several denominations, all with Baal enthroned on the obverse and a standing lion on the reverse. This variety with a spear head control symbol is attributed to Seleukos.
GS86798. Silver double shekel, Nicolet-Pierre p. 289, 2; BMC Arabia p. 181, 4, pl. XX, 17; Mitchiner IGIS 7b; SNG Cop -; Traité -; Babelon Perses -, aVF, nearly as struck but high points unstruck and flat (common for the type), flan flaw on obv., obv. off center, weight 16.743 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 135o, Babylon mint, c. 328 - 311 B.C.; obverse Baaltarz enthroned left on seat without back, himation over left shoulder and around hips and legs, lotus tipped scepter vertical before him in right hand, left hand rests on his hip; reverse lion standing left, spear head left (control symbol) above; rare; $300.00 (€255.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Peithon, Satrap of Babylon, c. 315 - Autumn 312 B.C.; In the Name of Alexander the Great

Click for a larger photo
Struck by Peithon, son of Agenor, the Macedonian satrap in Babylon, 315 - 312 B.C. Peithon was a successful officer under Alexander, first mentioned as the commander of a phalanx battalion in January 325 in the battles against the Mallians in the southern Punjab. Alexander made him satrap of the Indus in 325 B.C. In 315 B.C., Antigonos Monophthalmos forced Seleukos to flee Babylon and replaced him with Peithon. Peithon fought alongside Antigonus Monophthalmus against Cassander and Ptolemy, in 314 B.C. He was killed in autumn 312 B.C., at the Battle of Gaza where the forces of Demetrius, the son of Antigonus, were defeated by Ptolemy.
GS86195. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3733, Müller Alexander 719, SNG Cop 842, SNG Alpha Bank 688 var. (slight var. in monogram under throne), SNG München -, VF, rough, burnished, obverse a little off center, weight 15.496 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 180o, Babylon mint, 315 - 312 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, MYHP monogram in wreath left, ΠAP monogram in circle under throne; $200.00 (€170.00)
 


Kingdom of Persis, Second Unknown King, 1st Century A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Persis was located in what is now southern Iran. "Persians" settled the area as early as the 8th century B.C. From the time after its conquest by Alexander the Great, Persis was most often quasi-independent, under the hegemony of a Seleukid or Parthian king. Immediately following Alexander's death, Persis was subject to the Seleucid Kingdom. About 290 B.C., Persis regained independence. The coins produced during this period were Greek-inspired, but inscriptions were Aramaic, symbolic of Persis' rejection of the Greek ruling class. Sometime between c. 250 and 223 B.C., the Seleucids regained control. Mithradates II later incorporated Persis as a sub-kingdom of Parthia. Under Parthian domination, the coins and appearance of the kings depicted on them assumed the Parthian style. The last King of Persis, Artaxerxes, defeated the Parthians and founded the Sassanian Empire.
GS63296. Silver hemidrachm, Tyler Smith, type 1, 210 ff. var.; BMC Arabia, 238, 18 var.; Sunrise 646 var.; Alram IP 619 var. (none with 3 rows of pellets), gVF, toned, tight flan, light deposits, weight 1.285 g, maximum diameter 12.7 mm, die axis 90o, Persepolis (Fars Province, Iran) mint, 1st century A.D.; obverse bearded bust left, wearing diadem with two-loop tie and Parthian-style tiara with three rows of pellets enclosing pellet above crescent; reverse diadem, formally presented with two ties laid across center; rare variety; $100.00 (€85.00)
 


Kingdom of Persis, Second Unknown King, 1st Century A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Persis was located in what is now southern Iran. "Persians" settled the area as early as the 8th century B.C. From the time after its conquest by Alexander the Great, Persis was most often quasi-independent, under the hegemony of a Seleukid or Parthian king. Immediately following Alexander's death, Persis was subject to the Seleucid Kingdom. About 290 B.C., Persis regained independence. The coins produced during this period were Greek-inspired, but inscriptions were Aramaic, symbolic of Persis' rejection of the Greek ruling class. Sometime between c. 250 and 223 B.C., the Seleucids regained control. Mithradates II later incorporated Persis as a sub-kingdom of Parthia. Under Parthian domination, the coins and appearance of the kings depicted on them assumed the Parthian style. The last King of Persis, Artaxerxes, defeated the Parthians and founded the Sassanian Empire.
GS65707. Silver hemidrachm, cf. Tyler-Smith, type 1, 210 (with ties); Alram IP 619 var. (same); cf. Sunrise 649 (obol); BMC Arabia p. 238, 16 (same), VF, toned, tight flan, die wear, obverse center weak, light marks, porosity, weight 1.171 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 0o, Persepolis (Fars Province, Iran) mint, 1st century A.D.; obverse bearded bust left, wearing diadem with two-loop tie and Parthian-style tiara with two rows of pellets enclosing crescent and three pellets, no triskeles behind bust; reverse diadem without ties, blundered illiterate imitation of an Aramaic legend around; apparently unpublished as a hemidrachm; rare variety; $90.00 (€76.50)
 


Kingdom of Persis, Second Unknown King, 1st Century A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Persis was located in what is now southern Iran. "Persians" settled the area as early as the 8th century B.C. From the time after its conquest by Alexander the Great, Persis was most often quasi-independent, under the hegemony of a Seleukid or Parthian king. Immediately following Alexander's death, Persis was subject to the Seleucid Kingdom. About 290 B.C., Persis regained independence. The coins produced during this period were Greek-inspired, but inscriptions were Aramaic, symbolic of Persis' rejection of the Greek ruling class. Sometime between c. 250 and 223 B.C., the Seleucids regained control. Mithradates II later incorporated Persis as a sub-kingdom of Parthia. Under Parthian domination, the coins and appearance of the kings depicted on them assumed the Parthian style. The last King of Persis, Artaxerxes, defeated the Parthians and founded the Sassanian Empire.
GS65703. Silver diobol, BMC Arabia p. 227, 11; cf. Tyler-Smith, type 2, 220 - 221 (obol); Alram IP 622 (obol); Sunrise 650 (obol), VF, well centered, light toning, tiny edge split, weight 1.088 g, maximum diameter 11.9 mm, die axis 270o, Persepolis (Fars Province, Iran) mint, End of 1st Century A.D.; obverse bearded, draped bust left, wearing turreted crown and diadem, hair with three rows of curls; reverse diadem, formally presented with two ties laid across center; $80.00 (€68.00)
 


Kingdom of Persis, Darios (Darev) II, 1st Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Persis was located in what is now southern Iran. "Persians" settled the area as early as the 8th century B.C. From the time after its conquest by Alexander the Great, Persis was most often quasi-independent, under the hegemony of a Seleukid or Parthian king. Immediately following Alexander's death, Persis was subject to the Seleucid Kingdom. About 290 B.C., Persis regained independence. The coins produced during this period were Greek-inspired, but inscriptions were Aramaic, symbolic of Persis' rejection of the Greek ruling class. Sometime between c. 250 and 223 B.C., the Seleucids regained control. Mithradates II later incorporated Persis as a sub-kingdom of Parthia. Under Parthian domination, the coins and appearance of the kings depicted on them assumed the Parthian style. The last King of Persis, Artaxerxes, defeated the Parthians and founded the Sassanian Empire.
GS65701. Silver hemidrachm, Tyler-Smith, type 1c, 17; BMC Arabia p. 218, 16; Sunrise 591 var. (2 rows of pellets); Alram IP 565 var. (same), VF, toned, well centered on a tight flan, weight 2.084 g, maximum diameter 11.6 mm, die axis 0o, Persepolis (Fars Province, Iran) mint, 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded bust left, wearing diadem and Parthian-style tiara with three rows of pellets surrounding crescent; reverse Aramaic legend: King Darev, king on right, standing left, holding scepter, facing altar on left; $75.00 (€63.75)
 


Kingdom of Persis, Darios (Darev) II, 1st Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Persis was located in what is now southern Iran. "Persians" settled the area as early as the 8th century B.C. From the time after its conquest by Alexander the Great, Persis was most often quasi-independent, under the hegemony of a Seleukid or Parthian king. Immediately following Alexander's death, Persis was subject to the Seleucid Kingdom. About 290 B.C., Persis regained independence. The coins produced during this period were Greek-inspired, but inscriptions were Aramaic, symbolic of Persis' rejection of the Greek ruling class. Sometime between c. 250 and 223 B.C., the Seleucids regained control. Mithradates II later incorporated Persis as a sub-kingdom of Parthia. Under Parthian domination, the coins and appearance of the kings depicted on them assumed the Parthian style. The last King of Persis, Artaxerxes, defeated the Parthians and founded the Sassanian Empire.
GS65722. Silver hemidrachm, Tyler-Smith, type 1a, 5 - 8; Alram IP 565 var. (two rows of pellets); Sunrise 591 var. (same); BMC Arabia p. 218, 16 var. (same), VF, toned, well centered on a tight flan, tiny edge cracks, light marks, weight 1.575 g, maximum diameter 12.9 mm, die axis 315o, Persepolis (Fars Province, Iran) mint, 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded bust left, wearing diadem and Parthian-style tiara with one row of pellets surrounding crescent, pellet border; reverse Aramaic legend: King Darev, king on right, standing left, holding scepter, facing altar on left; $75.00 (€63.75)
 


Kingdom of Persis, Second Unknown King, 1st Century A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Persis was located in what is now southern Iran. "Persians" settled the area as early as the 8th century B.C. From the time after its conquest by Alexander the Great, Persis was most often quasi-independent, under the hegemony of a Seleukid or Parthian king. Immediately following Alexander's death, Persis was subject to the Seleucid Kingdom. About 290 B.C., Persis regained independence. The coins produced during this period were Greek-inspired, but inscriptions were Aramaic, symbolic of Persis' rejection of the Greek ruling class. Sometime between c. 250 and 223 B.C., the Seleucids regained control. Mithradates II later incorporated Persis as a sub-kingdom of Parthia. Under Parthian domination, the coins and appearance of the kings depicted on them assumed the Parthian style. The last King of Persis, Artaxerxes, defeated the Parthians and founded the Sassanian Empire.
GS63285. Silver diobol, BMC Arabia p. 227, 11; cf. Tyler-Smith, type 2, 220 -221 (obol); Alram IP 622 (obol); Sunrise 650 (obol), gVF, well centered, uneven toning, weight 1.077 g, maximum diameter 13.0 mm, die axis 45o, Persepolis (Fars Province, Iran) mint, End of 1st Century A.D.; obverse bearded, draped bust left, wearing turreted crown and diadem, hair with three rows of curls; reverse diadem, formally presented with two ties laid across center; $70.00 (€59.50)
 




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


REFERENCES

Babelon, E. Numismatique d'Edessa. (Paris, 1904).
Castelin, K. The Coinage of Rhesaena in Mesopotamia. ANSNNM 108. (New York, 1946).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol III, Part 2. (London, 1926).
Göbl, R. Münzprägung des Kusanreiches. (Wien, 1984).
Göbl, R. Sasanian Numismatics. (Braunschweig, 1971).
Gyselen, R., ed. New Evidence for Sasanian Numismatics: The Collection of Ahmad Saeedi. (Leuven, Belgium, 2004).
Hill, G. Catalogue of the Greek Coins in the British Museum: Arabia, Mesopotamia and Persia. (London, 1922).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Syrian Coins, Royal and Civic Issues, Fourth to First Centuries BC. HGC 9. (Lancaster, PA, 2009).
Houghton, A. Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton. ACNAC 4. (New York, 1983).
Houghton, A., C. Lorber & O. Hoover. Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalog. (Lancaster, 2002 - 2008).
Klose, D. & W. Müseler. Die Münzen aus Persepolis von Alexander dem Großen zu den Sasaniden. (Munich, 2008).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Mitchiner, M. Indo-Greek and Indo-Scythian Coinage. (London, 1975-1976).
Nelson, B., ed. Numismatic Art of Persia. The Sunrise Collection, Part I: Ancient - 650 BC to AD 650. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
Newell, E. T. Alexander Hoards II, Demanhur, 1905. ANSNNM 19 (1923).
Newell, E. T. The Coinage of the Eastern Seleucid Mints, From Seleucus I to Antiochus III. (New York, 1938).
Nicolet-Pierre, H. "Silver and gold strikes in Babylonia between 331 and 311 or Mazda Seleucus" in Travaux Le Rider.
Nicolet-Pierre, H. "Thionèsis, roi de Characène (25/24-20/19 ou 19/18 avant J.-C.)" in Revue Numismatique, 6e sér. 20 (1978).
Prieur, M. & K. Prieur. The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and their fractions from 57 BC to AD 258. (Lancaster, PA, 2000).
Price, M. The Coinage in the name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. (Zurich-London, 1991).
RPC Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sellwood, D. An Introduction to the Coinage of Parthia. (London, 1980).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 7: Cyprus to India. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, Univ. of Glasgow, Part 2: Roman Provincial Coins: Cyprus-Egypt. (Oxford, 2008).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Israel I, The Arnold Spaer Collection of Seleucid Coins. (London, 1998).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 1: The Muharrem Kayhan Collection. (Istanbul, 2002).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, United States, Burton Y. Berry. Part 2. Megaris to Egypt.. (New York, 1962).
Tyler-Smith, S. "A parcel of Persis drachms, half drachms and obols" in NC 164 (2004).
van't Haaff, P. Catalogue of Elymaean Coinage, Ca. 147 B.C. - A.D. 228. (Lancaster, PA. 2007).
Waggoner, N. "The Early Alexander Coinage at Seleucia on the Tigris" in ANSMN 15 (1969).
Winzer, A. Antike portraitmünzen der Perser und Greichen aus vor-hellenistischer Zeit (Zeitraum ca. 510-322 v.Chr.). (March-Hugstetten, 2005).
Wroth, W. A Catalogue of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Parthia. (London, 1903).

Catalog current as of Saturday, May 26, 2018.
Page created in 1.254 seconds.
Persia and Mesopotamia