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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Anatolia ▸ Ionia ▸ Other IoniaView Options:  |  |  | 

Ionia

Ionia lies in central Western Anatolia (Asia Minor) on the shores of the Aegean Sea. The region is rather small and mountainous unsuited for agriculture but excellent for seafaring. Greek settlement took place in the 11th to 10th Centuries B.C. despite hostilities with the native Luwians (Indo-European people related to the Hittites and Lycians). After resisting fairly well to the Cimmerian invasion, the Ionians were gradually conquered by the Lycian Kingdom, and later by the Persian Empire. Ionia was freed by Alexander but became a contested prize for the Hellenistic kings, until the last king of Pergamum bequeathed his land to Rome. Ionia offered the world countless philosophers and men of science, and a fabulous school of art.


Western Anatolia, c. 620 - 600 B.C., Plain Globular Type

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Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

Unpublished! The majority of the earliest electrum issues were struck on the lighter Milesian weight standard, with hectes weighing approximately 2.35 grams. This example, however is on the heavier Phocaic standard that was used at mints such as Cyzicus, Mysia and Phocaea, Ionia.
SH85577. Electrum hekte, Phokaic standard 1/6 stater; unpublished, EF, flan cracks, weight 2.721 g, maximum diameter 8.96 mm, uncertain western Anatolia mint, c. 620 - 600 B.C.; obverse plain globular surface; reverse one small incuse square punch; extremely rare; $3250.00 (€2762.50)
 


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C.

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This is an Alexandrine type drachm, meaning it has the types of Alexander's drachms, Herakles and Zeus Aëtophoros. Thompson notes, "Teos, like Colophon, was a royal mint [for Lysimachos] for only a short time. Its scanty output of drachms falls in the period before Lysimachus began to issue money with his own types."
GS86508. Silver drachm, Price L38 corr. (control positions), Thompson 130 corr. (control positions), Müller 34 ff. var. (monogram), Müller Alexander -, SNG Cop -, gVF, toned, centered on a tight flan, light marks, weight 4.258 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Teos (near Sigacik, Turkey) mint, lifetime issue, c. 301/299 - 297 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, right leg drawn back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, griffin seated left above monogram (controls) in lower left field, ΛYΣIMAXOY (Lysimachos) downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) in exergue; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; very rare; $385.00 (€327.25)
 


Klazomenai, Ionia, c. 499 - 494 B.C.

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"And at least six Greek towns used the image of a winged boar on their coins: Klazomenai, Samos, Kyzikos, Ialysos, Kisthene and Mytilene. This winged boar is usually identified as Chrysaor, brother of Pegasus. On coins we only see the front half of the animal (the technical numismatic term is "protome" – which roughly translates as "first cut.") The rest of Chrysaor shows up painted on the shield of Geryon, who fights Herakles on a famous cup painted by the artist Euphronios (ca. 500 BCE)." -- "This Little Piggy Went to Market: Boars, Hogs, Sows and Piglets on Ancient Coins" by Mike Markowitz in CoinWeek
GA85719. Silver diobol, SNGvA 1984, SNG Tübingen 455, SNG Cop 7, SNG München -, BMC Ionia -, VF, toned, scratches, porosity, edge cracks, weight 1.049 g, maximum diameter 11.2 mm, die axis 0o, Klazomenai (near Urla Turkey) mint, c. 499 - 494 B.C.; obverse forepart of a winged boar right, A above; reverse quadripartite incuse square; scarce variety; $115.00 (€97.75)
 


Erythrai, Ionia, c. 330 - 300 B.C.

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The ruins of Erythrai are north of the town IIldiri in the Cesme district of Izmir Province, Turkey. The city did not lie exactly on the coast, but some little distance inland, and had a harbor on the coast named Cissus. Erythrae was never a large city, but was renowned for its wine, goats, timber, and millstones, as well as its prophetic sibyls, Herophile and Athenais. The Erythraeans were for a considerable time subject to the supremacy of Athens. About 453 B.C. Erythrae, refusing to pay tribute, seceded from the Delian League. A garrison and a new government restored the union, but late in the Peloponnesian War, in 412 B.C. it revolted again with Chios and Clazomenae. Erythrai_amphitheater

GB86474. Bronze AE 21, BMC Ionia p. 128, 102 - 103 var. (diff. magistrate); SNG Cop 634 var. (same); SNG Mün 638 var. (same), SNGvA -; SNG Tüb -; SNG Kayhan -; Lindgren -, VF, well centered, mottled green and red patina, a little rough, weight 4.550 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 180o, Ionia, Erythrai (north of Ildiri, Turkey) mint, c. 330 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress, tied at the neck; reverse EPY above club left, HPO∆OTOΣ / HPAKΛEOY (Herodotos son of Herakleos) in two lines across center, bow inside case right below; apparently unpublished with this magistrate and the only example known to Forum; $80.00 (€68.00)
 


Klazomenai, Ionia, 190 - 30 B.C.

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The ruins of Klazomenai (or Clazomenae) are in the modern town Urla near Izmir in Izmir Province, Turkey. It was one of the first cities to issue silver coinage. Clazomenae was attacked by the Lydian king Alyattes II in the 6th century. During the 5th century it was for some time subject to the Athenians, but about the middle of the Peloponnesian War, c. 412 B.C. it revolted. After a brief resistance, it again acknowledged the Athenian supremacy, and repelled a Lacedaemonian attack. In 387 B.C. Klazomenai and other cities in Asia were taken over by Persia, but the city continued to issue its own coins. Under the Romans, Clazomenae was included in the province of Asia, and enjoyed an immunity from taxation.
GB79286. Bronze AE 18, BMC Ionia p. 29, 105 - 107; SNG Cop 104, SNG Munchen 504, VF, tight flan, some corrosion, weight 4.234 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 270o, Klazomenai mint, 190 - 30 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus; reverse club, handle left, KΛAZOME/NIΩN divided in two lines, starting above, ending below; very scarce; $70.00 (€59.50)
 


Leukai, Ionia, c. 350 - 300 B.C.

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Leukai (also Leucae or Leuce) was a small town of ancient Ionia, close to Phocaea. Leukai was, according to Pliny, on an island promontory. From Scylax we learn that it had harbors. According to Diodorus, the Persian admiral Tachos founded the town on an eminence on the sea coast in 352 B.C. Shortly after Tachos died, and the Clazomenians and Cymaeans quarreled over the town until the former took control. Leukai was near the site of the battle between the consul Publius Licinius Crassus Mucianius and the Pergamene rebel Aristonicus in 131 B.C.
GB71755. Bronze AE 10, cf. SNG Munchen 584 (ΛEO in exergue); BMC Ionia 5 - 6; SRCV II 4472 (AE 17, etc.); SNG Tub -, VF, nice green patina, weight 1.130 g, maximum diameter 10.4 mm, die axis 0o, Leukai mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo left; reverse swan standing left, wings open, head down, ΛEO(?) upward behind; $50.00 (€42.50)
 







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REFERENCES

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Catalog current as of Saturday, May 26, 2018.
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Other Ionia