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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Numismatics ▸ CertifiedView Options:  |  |  | 

Certified or Encapsulated Coins

Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG XI

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This may have been a legion raised by Antony and disbanded by Augustus. The XI Claudia, an old legion of Caesar's, fought for Octavian (and won the title Actiaca at the battle of Actium).
SL79267. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/25, Sydenham 1229, BMCRR II East 203, RSC I 39, NGC F, strike 3/5, surface 2/5, banker's marks (2400602-008), toned, weight 3.48 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - XI, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; NGC certified (slabbed); $450.00 (400.50)


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

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Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

David Sear notes, "a previously unpublished variant of the series listed by Bastien (Le Monnayage de l'Atelier de Lyon) on pages 163 and 164, numbers 155-6 and 159-61 (cf. RIC vii, p. 134, 202-4)...good F, rare and interesting as an unpublished obverse variant."
RL70838. Billon centenionalis, unpublished obverse variant; cf. Bastien Lyon XIII, 155-6 and 159-61; RIC VII Lyons 202 - 204, gF, weight 3.451 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, as caesar, 322 - 323 A.D.; obverse IVL CRISPVS NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust left, spear pointed forward in right, shield in left; reverse BEAT TRAN-Q-LITAS, globe on altar inscribed VOT/IS / XX in three lines, three stars above, PLG in exergue; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; $135.00 (120.15)


Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D.

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In 162, Marcus Aurelius sent Lucius Verus to lead the war against Parthia. Lucius spent most of the campaign in Antioch, though he wintered at Laodicea and summered at Daphne, a resort just outside Antioch. Critics derided Lucius' luxurious lifestyle. He took up a mistress, enjoyed the company of actors and would "dice the whole night through." The Syrian army was said to spend more time in Antioch's open-air cafs than with their units. The war was, nevertheless, a success. Despite Lucius' minimal personal participation, he was awarded the titles Armeniacus, Medicus and Parthicus Maximus and a triumph upon his return to Rome in 166.
SL76246. Orichalcum sestertius, BMCRE IV p. 564, 1116; Cohen 249, RIC III M. Aurelius 1396 var. (drapery not mentioned), NGC certified VG, strike 4/5, surface 2/5, lt. scrapes (4094568-014), weight 22.91 g, maximum diameter 33.0 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, Dec 163 - Dec 164 A.D.; obverse L AVREL VERVS - AVG ARMENIACVS, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse TR P IIII - IMP II COS II, Victory standing facing, head right, nude to the waist, both wings visible on left, palm frond in right, resting left on shield inscribed VIC / AVG in two lines set on palm tree, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking in lower fields; from the Sam Mansourati Collection; scarce; $130.00 (115.70)


Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus

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Ceres a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly relationships, was listed among the Di Consentes, Rome's equivalent to the Twelve Olympians of Greek mythology. The Romans saw her as the counterpart of the Greek goddess Demeter, whose mythology was reinterpreted for Ceres in Roman art and literature.
SL73983. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III M1728; BMCRE IV p. 575, 1194; Cohen III 2; Hunter II 47; MIR Szaivert 24; SRCV II 5496, NGC F, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (3761245-013), weight 26.30 g, maximum diameter 29.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 2nd issue, c. 166 - 169 A.D.; obverse LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waved and fastened in a chignon; reverse CERES, Ceres seated left on a basket (cista mystica) from which a snake is emerging, two stalks of grain in right hand, torch in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; ex Johnathan K. Kern; $110.00 (97.90)


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

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Ceres' known mythology is indistinguishable from Demeter's. Her virgin daughter Proserpina (Persephone) was abducted by Hades to be his wife in the underworld. Ceres searched for her endlessly lighting her way through the earth with torches. While Ceres (Demeter) searched, she was preoccupied with her loss and her grief. The seasons halted; living things ceased their growth, then began to die. Some say that in her anger she laid a curse on the world that caused plants to wither and die, and the land to become desolate. Faced with the extinction of all life on earth, Zeus sent his messenger Hermes to the underworld to bring Proserpina back. However, because she had eaten while in the underworld, Hades had a claim on her. Therefore, it was decreed that she would spend four months each year in the underworld. During these months Ceres grieves for her daughter's absence, withdrawing her gifts from the world, creating winter. Proserpina's return brings the spring.
SL73986. Silver denarius, RIC III 362, BMCRE IV 421, RSC II 104, SRCV II 4584, NGC Ch VF, strike 5/5, surface 3/5, (4162520-008), weight 3.00 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 147 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right; reverse AVGVSTA, Ceres standing facing, head left, long torch in right hand, raising drapery with left; $80.00 (71.20)


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius III Eucaerus, c. 96 - 87 B.C.

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Demetrius III Eucaerus ("the Timely") was nicknamed Acaerus ("the Untimely) by the Jews. He defeated the Hasmonaean Priest King Alexander Jannaeus but was forced to withdraw from Judaea by the hostile population. While attempting to dethrone his brother, Philip I Philadelphus, he was defeated by the Arabs and Parthians, and taken prisoner. He was held in confinement in Parthia by Mithridates II until his death in 88 B.C.
SL46356. Bronze AE 17, Houghton-Lorber II 2455(3) (referencing only Spaer); SNG Spaer 2851; Galilee Hoard H44 (this coin), NGC Fine, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (4161251-008), weight 3.107 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Damascus mint, 95 - 94 B.C.; obverse diademed, lightly bearded head of Demetrius III right; reverse BACIΛEΩC ∆HMHTPIOY ΘEOY ΦIΛOMHTOPOC CΩTHPOC, Hermes standing facing, palm frond in right, kerykeion in left, N over A outer left, HIΣ (year 218) in exergue; ex Galilee Hoard (found north of the Sea of Galilee in 1989), NGC Certified (photographed before the coin was slabbed); $60.00 (53.40)







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Catalog current as of Tuesday, March 28, 2017.
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Certified Coins