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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Silver Under $100||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Silver Coins Under $100

Coins are listed from highest |price| to lowest. If you are a serious bargain hunter, click the last page first and move backwards to the first page.


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 330 - 284 B.C.

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Pergamon, Mysia was located to the northwest of the modern city of Bergama, Turkey, 16 miles (26 km) from the Aegean Sea on a promontory on the north side of the Caicus (Bakircay) River. It was the capital of the Kingdom of Pergamon under the Attalid dynasty, 281-133 B.C. Pergamon is cited in the book of Revelation as one of the seven churches of Asia.
GS64046. Silver diobol, BMC Mysia p. 111, 9 (PERGAMH); SNG Kayhan 66; cf. SNG BnF 1558 ff.; SNG Cop 322; SNGvA 1350; SNG Delepierre 2534; Von Fritze 10, aVF, toned, scratches and bumps, weight 1.251 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 282 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing a Nemean Lion's scalp headdress; reverse cultus statue of Athena standing facing (Palladium), kalathos, drapery hanging over both shoulders, spear in right hand, shield in left hand with dangling fillet, ΠEPΓAMH upward on left; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariobarzanes I Philoromaios, c. 96 - 63 B.C.

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Ariobarzanes I was a Cappadocian nobleman of obscure Persian descent. After the Roman Senate rejected the claims of Ariarathes IX, he was made king through a vote of Cappadocian citizens and with the support of the Roman consul Lucius Cornelius Sulla. He ruled a kingdom that was a Roman protectorate but was removed three separate times by Mithridates before not only securing but actually increasing his lands under Pompey in the Third Mithridatic War. He abdicated to make way for the rule of his son Ariobarzanes II.
GS87953. Silver drachm, cf. Simonetta Collection 59; Simonetta 44b; SNGvA 6324; SNG Cop 157; BMC Galatia p. 40, 21; Cohen DCA 460; HGC 7 846, VF, light toning, slightly off center, small edge crack, weight 4.074 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Mazaka-Eusebeia (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, c. 66 - 65 B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse BAΣIΛE•Σ API•BAPZAN•Y ΦIΛ•PΩMAI•Y (King Ariobarzanes, friend of the Romans), Athena Nikephoros standing left, Nike left extending wreath in Athena's right hand, left hand on grounded shield and spear behind, monogram inner left, obscure date (Λ? = year 30) in exergue; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariobarzanes I Philoromaios, 96 - 63 B.C.

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Ariobarzanes I was a Cappadocian nobleman of obscure Persian descent. After the Roman Senate rejected the claims of Ariarathes IX, he was made king through a vote of Cappadocian citizens and with the support of the Roman consul Lucius Cornelius Sulla. He ruled a kingdom that was a Roman protectorate but was removed three separate times by Mithridates before not only securing but actually increasing his lands under Pompey in the Third Mithridatic War. He abdicated to make way for the rule of his son Ariobarzanes II.
GS87956. Silver drachm, Simonetta Collection 53b, Simonetta 38e; cf. BMC Galatia p. 40, 23 (date off flan); Cohen DCA 460 (71/70 B.C.); HGC 7 846; SNGvA -, aVF, well centered, toned, light marks and scratches, weight 4.138 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Mazaka-Eusebeia (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, 68 - 67 B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ API•BAPZAN•Y ΦIΛ•PΩMAI•Y (King Ariobarzanes, friend of the Romans), Athena Nikephoros slightly left, head left, Nike offering wreath in Athena's right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield with spear behind, monogram inner left, KH (year 28) in exergue; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


Kalchedon, Bithynia, c. 340 - 320 B.C.

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The position of Chalcedon, on the eastern shore of the Bosporus, was not as favorable as that of Byzantion on the opposite side. The Persian Megabazus (Herod. iv. 144) said the founders of Chalcedon must have been blind, for Chalcedon was settled seventeen years before Byzantium; and the settlers, we must suppose, had the choice of the two places.
GS89052. Silver half siglos, SNG BM 118; SNGvA 484; SNG Stancomb 14; BMC Pontus p. 124, 8; HGC 7 518, gF, toned, struck with a worn obverse die, weight 2.806 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, Kalchedon (Kadikoya District, Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 340 - 320 B.C.; obverse KAΛX, bull standing left on ear of grain right; reverse quadripartite incuse square of mill-sail pattern, stippled texture within incuse areas; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue

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Aradus minted coinage in the name of Alexander during his lifetime and shortly after. When Aradus gained autonomy in 259 B.C., the city again minted coinage in the name of Alexander. After the Ptolemaic victory over the Seleukid Kingdom at Raphia in 217 B.C. Aradus fell under the control of Egypt. In 214, Aradus ceased to issue Alexander coinage and struck regal Ptolemaic issues. In 202 B.C., as Ptolemaic power waned, Aradus returned to issuing coinage of Alexander. The last Alexander coinage of Aradus was struck in 166/165 B.C.
GS89320. Silver hemidrachm, SNG Saroglos 809 (same reverse die), Price 3318, Müller Alexander 1365, SNG Cop 1009, SNG München 741, SNG Berry 269, aVF, toned, rough, porous, weight 1.991 g, maximum diameter 13.3 mm, die axis 90o, Phoenicia, Aradus mint, c. 328 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) in exergue, Σ (control) left, A/P monogram (control) under throne below strut; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

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Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars was a father (pater) of the Roman people. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RS89765. Silver denarius, RIC III 349, RSC II 926, BMCRE IV 664, Hunter II 69, SRCV II -, F, well centered, light toning, light marks, small darker spots, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.191 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, Dec 175 - Dec 176 A.D.; obverse M ANTONINVS AVG GERM SARM, laureate head right; reverse TR P XXX IMP VIII COS III, Mars advancing right, nude but for helmet and cloak tied on belt, transverse spear in right hand, trophy of arms in left hand over left shoulder; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


Magnesia ad Maeandrum, Ionia, c. 350 - 320 B.C.

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Magnesia ad Maeandrum was an inland city of Ionia, located on a small tributary of the Maeander River about 12 miles southeast of Ephesus. "..the temple of Artemis Leukophryene, which in the size of its shrine and in the number of its votive offerings is inferior to the temple at Ephesos, but in the harmony and skill shown in the structure of the sacred enclosure is far superior to it. And in size it surpasses all the sacred enclosures in Asia except two, that at Ephesos (to Artemis) and that at Didymoi (to Apollo)" -- Strabo, Geography 14. 1. 40.
GS90991. Silver hemidrachm, Weber 5996; BMC Ionia p. 159, 11; SNG Kayhan 414 ff. var. (different magistrate); SNG Cop 809 var. (same), F, toned, tight flan, weight 1.316 g, maximum diameter 12.3 mm, die axis 45o, Magnesia ad Maeandrum (near Tekin, Turkey) mint, c. 350 - 320 B.C.; obverse Cavalryman on horseback prancing right, wearing helmet, cuirass, and chlamys, holding couched spear; reverse bull butting left atop Maeander pattern, MAΓN above, stalk of grain right, MIKYΘOΣ (magistrate) below; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


Phokaia, Ionia, c. 387 - 246 B.C.

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Phocaea, or Phokaia, was the northernmost Ionian city, on the boundary with Aeolis. The Phocaeans were the first Greeks to make long sea-voyages, developed a thriving seafaring economy, became a great naval power, and founded the colonies Massalia (Marseille, France), Emporion (Empúries, Spain) and Elea (Velia, Italy). They remained independent until all of mainland Ionia fell to Croesus of Lydia (c. 560-545 B.C.). In 546 B.C., Lydia was conquered by Cyrus the Great of Persia. After the Greeks defeated Xerxes I, Phocaea joined the Delian League, but later rebelled with the rest of Ionia. In 387 B.C., Phocaea returned to Persian control. After Alexander, it fell under Seleucid, then Attalid, and finally Roman rule.
GS91377. Silver hemidrachm, Ashton-Kinns I 2 (O1/R2), SNG München 812, Waddington 1892, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, F, toned, rough, edge flaws, weight 1.915 g, maximum diameter 13.3 mm, die axis 315o, Phokaia (Foca, Turkey) mint, c. 387 - 246 B.C.; obverse head of Athena left in crested Attic helmet, bowl wreathed in olive leaf; reverse griffin head left, AΘ monogram left; rare; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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This reverse type announces Severus' achievement of Peace. Hence the emperor is wearing civilian clothes and holding the same branch which is usually held by the goddess Pax.
RS91224. Silver denarius, RIC IV 265; RSC III 205; BMCRE V p. 217, 330; Hunter III 87; SRCV II 6282, Choice VF, well centered, nice portrait, edge cracks, weight 3.177 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 201 A.D.; obverse SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse FVNDATOR PACIS (founder of peace), Severus standing left, togate, olive branch in right hand, scroll in left; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 76 (7 Apr 2019), part of lot 942; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


England, Edward I Longshanks, 1272 - 1307

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Known as Edward Longshanks for his height of 6 ft. 2 in., and sometimes as the "Hammer of the Scots." Edward was ruthless in pursuing his aims and crushing those who opposed him. He conquered large parts of Wales and almost succeeding in doing the same to Scotland.
UK91708. Silver penny, SCBC 1408, North 1037/1, F, well centered, old cabinet toning, weak centers, weight 1.360 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 315o, London (Tower) mint, 1299 - 1301; obverse + EDWR ANGL DNS HYB (Edward [King of] England, Lord of Ireland, N's unbarred "pot-hook" variety), facing bust of King, pellet eyes, drapery of two wedges, star on breast; reverse CIVITAS LONDON (City of London, N's unbarred "pot-hook" variety), long cross with trefoil of pellets in each angle; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $100.00 (€88.00)
 




  



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Silver Under $100