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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Budget & Wholesale ▸ Silver Under $100View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Silver Coins Under $100

Coins are listed from highest price to lowest. If you are a serious bargain hunter, click the last page first and move backwards to the first page.


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

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The Temple of Apollo Palatinus, on the Palatine Hill, was dedicated by Octavian on 9 October 28 B.C. in return for vows made for his victories over Sextus Pompeius at the Battle of Naulochus in 36 B.C. and over Mark Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium 31 B.C. It was built on a site where a lightning bolt had struck. Augustus' private house was directly connected to the terrace of the sanctuary. Ancient sources state the temple had ivory doors and held numerous works of sculpture. The remains were excavated in the 1960s.
RS85050. Silver denarius, Szaivert MIR 18 p.165, 805; BMCRE IV 271, pl. 97, 17 (aureus); RIC III 197 (S) var. (obv. leg.), RSC II 30 var. (same), Hunter II - (clv), F, dark deposits, rough, lamination defects, edge cracks, weight 2.082 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 189 A.D.; obverse M COMM ANT P FEL AVG BRIT P P, laureate head right; reverse APOLLINI PALATINO, Apollo Palatinus standing facing, head right, laureate and wearing long robe, plectrum in right hand, lyre resting on a column in left hand; there were only two specimens of this type in the Reka Devnia Hoard, and there are none on coin archives.; extremely rare; $100.00 (85.00)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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Bonus Eventus, the god of good outcomes, was originally worshiped by the Romans as a deity especially presiding over agriculture and successful harvests. During the Imperial era, he was associated with other types of success. The epithet Bonus, "the Good," is used with other abstract deities such as Bona Fortuna ("Good Fortune"), Bona Mens ("Good Thinking" or "Sound Mind"), and Bona Spes ("Good Hope," perhaps to be translated as "optimism"), as well as with the mysterious and multivalent Bona Dea, a goddess whose rites were celebrated by women.
RS87227. Silver denarius, RIC IV 347 (R); BMCRE V p. 83, 321; RSC III 66; cf. SRCV II 6267 (Emesa), aVF, tight flan cutting off parts of legends, small encrustations, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.853 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Alexandria mint, Feb - Aug 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, laureate head right; reverse BONI EVENTVS, Bonus Eventus standing left, basket of fruit in right, stalks of grain downward at side in left; rare; $100.00 (85.00)


Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariobarzanes I Philoromaios, c. 96 - 63 B.C.

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Ariobarzanes I was a Cappadocian nobleman of obscure Persian descent. After the Roman Senate rejected the claims of Ariarathes IX, he was made king through a vote of Cappadocian citizens and with the support of the Roman consul Lucius Cornelius Sulla. He ruled a kingdom that was a Roman protectorate but was removed three separate times by Mithridates before not only securing but actually increasing his lands under Pompey in the Third Mithridatic War. He abdicated to make way for the rule of his son Ariobarzanes II.
GS87953. Silver drachm, cf. Simonetta Collection 59; Simonetta 44b; SNGvA 6324; SNG Cop 157; BMC Galatia p. 40, 21; Cohen DCA 460; HGC 7 846, VF, light toning, slightly off center, small edge crack, weight 4.074 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Mazaka-Eusebeia (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, c. 66 - 65 B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse BAΣIΛEΣ APIBAPZANY ΦIΛPΩMAIY (King Ariobarzanes, friend of the Romans), Athena Nikephoros standing left, Nike left extending wreath in Athena's right hand, left hand on grounded shield and spear behind, monogram inner left, obscure date (Λ? = year 30) in exergue; $100.00 (85.00)


Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariobarzanes I Philoromaios, 96 - 63 B.C.

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Ariobarzanes I was a Cappadocian nobleman of obscure Persian descent. After the Roman Senate rejected the claims of Ariarathes IX, he was made king through a vote of Cappadocian citizens and with the support of the Roman consul Lucius Cornelius Sulla. He ruled a kingdom that was a Roman protectorate but was removed three separate times by Mithridates before not only securing but actually increasing his lands under Pompey in the Third Mithridatic War. He abdicated to make way for the rule of his son Ariobarzanes II.
GS87956. Silver drachm, Simonetta Collection 53b, Simonetta 38e; cf. BMC Galatia p. 40, 23 (date off flan); Cohen DCA 460 (71/70 B.C.); HGC 7 846; SNGvA -, aVF, well centered, toned, light marks and scratches, weight 4.138 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Mazaka-Eusebeia (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, 68 - 67 B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ APIBAPZANY ΦIΛPΩMAIY (King Ariobarzanes, friend of the Romans), Athena Nikephoros slightly left, head left, Nike offering wreath in Athena's right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield with spear behind, monogram inner left, KH (year 28) in exergue; $100.00 (85.00)


Phokaia, Ionia, c. 521 - 478 B.C.

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Phokaia was the most northerly of the Ionian communities in Anatolia and was the mother city of many colonies in the western Mediterranean area, including Massalia (modern Marseille, France). This type (with approximately the same weight) is identified in references variously as a diobol, a trihemiobol, a hemihekte, or a 1/12 stater.
GA88087. Silver hemihekte, Cahn Ionische 2, SNG Kayhan 522, SNGvA 1813, Rosen 597 (trihemiobol), Klein 452 (diobol), VF, centered on a crowded flan, etched surfaces, weight 1.247 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, Phokaia (Foca, Turkey) mint, late 6th century B.C.; obverse head of nymph left, curly hair in three rows of dots, sakkos ornamented with a cross band of pearls, round earring with six pearls; reverse irregular quadripartite incuse square; $100.00 (85.00)


Roman Republic, Q. Marcius, C. Fabius & L. Roscius, c. 118 - 117 B.C.

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In 118 B.C., the Second Dalmatian War ended with victory for Rome. Lucius Caecilius Metellus assumed the surname Delmaticus.
RR88373. Silver denarius, Crawford 283/1b, Sydenham 541a, RSC I Marcia 17, RSC I Fabia 13, BMCRR I Italy 479, RBW Collection 1112, SRCV 159 var. (noted), F, toned, a little rough, reverse slightly off center, weight 3.564 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, c. 118 - 117 B.C.; obverse head of Roma left in winged helmet, crest with griffin head, peaked visor in three pieces, wearing single drop earring and necklace, hair in three locks, X (mark of value) behind; reverse Victory in quadriga right, raising wreath in extended right hand, reins in left hand, ROMA below, CFLRQM in exergue; $100.00 (85.00)


Roman Republic, Lucius Rubrius Dossenus, 87 B.C.

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This is of three denarii types issued by the moneyer, each type depicts one of the three chief deities of the capital, Jupiter, Juno, or Minerva. The empty triumphal chariot on the reverse may reflect hope for triumph in the fight against Marius and his followers. This moneyer may be the senator, L. Rubrius Dossenus, who was taken prisoner in 49 B.C. by Julius Caesar after the seven-day siege of Corfinium, the only resistance against Caesar's advance into Italy. Caesar released his prisoners after obtaining oaths of loyalty; oaths many promptly broke. The Rubria gens never attained much importance and this is the only member named on coinage.
RR88389. Silver denarius, Crawford 348/1, Sydenham 705, RSC I Rubria 1, BMCRR I Rome 2448, RBW Collection 1322, SRCV I 258, gVF, some luster, obverse die damage, crowed flan, scrape on reverse, tiny edge split, weight 3.974 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 87 B.C.; obverse head of Jupiter right, scepter over shoulder, DOSSEN downward behind and below; reverse triumphal quadriga walking right, side-panel ornamented with a thunderbolt, small Victory on top holding wreath, LRVBRI in exergue; $100.00 (85.00)


Roman Republic, Quintus Antonius Balbus, 83 B.C.

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Q. Antonius Balbus was a member of the Marian party and issued this coinage by special decree of the Senate to prepare for opposition to Sulla's return to Rome. In 82 B.C. he was appointed praetor in Sardinia. He was driven from Sardinia by L. Philippus, the legate of Sulla, and slain. Sulla prevailed and the Victory on the reverse of this type was proven a false hope. -- The Coinage of the Roman Republic by Edward A. Sydenham
RR88393. Silver denarius serratus, BMCRR I Rome 2765 (also R control), RBW Collection 1374 (same), SRCV I 279, Sydenham 742, Crawford 364/1, RSC I Antonia 1, F, toned, porous, reverse slightly off center cutting off part of exergue, weight 3.467 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 83 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Jupiter right, SC behind; reverse Victory in a quadriga right, raising wreath in right hand, reins and palm frond in left hand, R (control letter) below horses, QANTOBALB / PR in exergue (ANT and AL in monogram); ex The Time Machine; $100.00 (85.00)


Trebonianus Gallus, June or July 251 - July or August 253 A.D.

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Pietas in traditional Latin usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man or woman with pietas respected his or her responsibilities to the gods, family, other people and entities (such as the state), and understood his or her place in society with respect to others.
RS88861. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 72, RSC IV 88, Hunter III 47, SRCV III 9643, gF, nice portrait for the grade, full legends on a broad flan, toned, flow lines, minor encrustations, small edge split, weight 4.175 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 180o, Mediolanum (Milan, Italy)? mint, 251 - 253 A.D.; obverse IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PIETAS AVGG (to the piety of the two emperors), Pietas standing left, raising both hands, lighted altar at feet; $100.00 (85.00)


Kasolaba, Caria, c. 410 - 390 B.C.

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One of the letters on most example of this type or is only known in the Karian script but determining the mint city within Karia is less certain. The most current interpretation of the inscriptions and some recorded provenances support Kasolaba, a city which is mentioned in the Athenian Tribute Lists but whose precise location is uncertain.
GA89006. Silver hemiobol, Konuk Kasolaba 4, SNG Keckman 902, SNG Tbingen 3319, Klein 498, Troxell Carians 9 var. (with ethnic), VF, dark toning, off center, weight 0.284 g, maximum diameter 7.4 mm, die axis 90o, Kasolaba mint, c. 410 - 390 B.C.; obverse head of ram right, anepigraphic; reverse young male head right, within a shallow round incuse, anepigraphic; $100.00 (85.00)




  



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Silver Under $100