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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Budget & Wholesale ▸ Silver Under $100View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Silver Coins Under $100

Coins are listed from highest price to lowest. If you are a serious bargain hunter, click the last page first and move backwards to the first page.


Lot of 5 All Different Gallienus Silver or Billon Antoniniani

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SP65580. Silver Lot, Lot of 5 silver or billon antoniniani of Gallienus, no duplicate types, Fine or better, mostly nice coins with good metal for this emperor, coins in each 5 coin lot were selected from same lot as the coins in the photo; as-is, no returns, 5 coins; $120.00 (102.00)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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In the Roman Republic, and Empire, the curule chair (sella curulis, supposedly from currus, "chariot") was the seat upon which magistrates holding imperium were entitled to sit. This includes dictators, magistri equitum, consuls, praetors, censors, curule aediles, and the promagistrates, temporary or de facto holders of such offices. Additionally, the Flamen of Jupiter (Flamen Dialis) was also allowed to sit on a curule seat, though this position did not hold imperium. Livy writes that the three flamines maiores or high priests of the Archaic Triad of major gods were each granted the honor of the curule chair.
SH70290. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 6 (R); RSC II 541a; BMCRE II p. 8, 46; BnF III -; Hunter I -; SRCV I -, F, toned, tight flan, flan crack, weight 3.296 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 1st issue, 21 Dec 69 - early 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse TITVS ET DOMITIAN CAESARES PRIN IV, Titus and Domitian seated left, side by side on curule chairs, each holding a laurel branch in extended right hand; rare; $100.00 (85.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS76139. Silver drachm, Price 1779 var. (AΛ), Mller Alexander 1679 var. (same), SNG Cop 926 var. (same), Prokesch-Osten I 311 var. (same), SNG Munchen -, VF, dark uneven toning, weight 4.206 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, ΛEI monogram left, ΛA under throne; $100.00 (85.00)


Caria, Uncertain City (probably Mylasa), c. 420 - 390 B.C.

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Among the smallest coins ever minted.
GA76794. Silver tetartemorion, SNG Kayhan 940 - 943, SNG Keckman I 926, VF, weight 0.150 g, maximum diameter 5.7 mm, die axis 165o, Carian mint, c. 420 - 390 B.C.; obverse forepart of lion right, head turned back left; reverse bird standing left within incuse square; $100.00 (85.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS77605. Silver drachm, Price 1387, Mller Alexander 614, SNG Cop 888, SNG Alpha Bank 582, SNG Munchen 451, aVF, scratches and marks, porosity, weight 4.051 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 270o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle extended in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, Pegasos forepart left in left field, Artemis standing left holding torch under throne; $100.00 (85.00)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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In 215, Caracalla introduced the double denarius, or antoninianus. The weight of the new denomination was less than that of two denarii. The orichalcum and copper coinage disappeared gradually, and by the middle of the third century, with Rome's economy in crisis, the antoninianus was the only official currency.
RS79781. Silver denarius, RIC IV 258(c) (S); RSC III 279b; BMCRE VI p. 453, 114; Hunter III 32; SRCV II 6836, Choice VF, small edge cracks, weight 3.297 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 215 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P XVIII COS IIII P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power for 18 years, consul for the 4th time, father of the country), Jupiter standing right, nude but for cloak over left shoulder, thunderbolt at side in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; scarce; $100.00 (85.00)


Thasos, Islands off Thrace, c. 411 - 404 B.C.

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In 411 B.C., Thasos revolted from Athens and received a Lacedaemonian governor. In 407 B.C. Spartans were expelled and the Athenians readmitted. After the Battle of Aegospotami in 405 B.C., Thasos again fell under the Lacedaemonians led by Lysander who formed a decarchy there. Athens must have recovered it, for later it was a subject of dispute with Philip II of Macedonia.
GA84665. Silver tritartemorion, Le Rider Thasiennes 12; SNG Cop 1033, BMC Thrace 60, SNG Fitzwilliam 3665, McClean 4218, SGCV I 1756, VF, well centered, surfaces lightly etched, weight 0.393 g, maximum diameter 8.1 mm, die axis 180o, Thasos mint, c. 411 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of satyr right; reverse ΘAΣI, two dolphins swimming; $100.00 (85.00)


Roman Republic, C. Servilius C.f., 57 B.C.

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Interesting issue combining a Flora (goddess of the spring and flowers, associated with the Floralia festival) obverse with a military reverse. It is worth noting that the soldiers are in a rather relaxed pose and they do not seem to be ready to fight. However, the type has a rare variant on which they are crossing their swords.
RR85234. Silver denarius, Crawford 423/1, Sydenham 890, RSC I Servilia 15, SRCV I 380, VF, porous, weight 3.332 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 57 B.C.; obverse FLORAL PRIMVS (AL and MV ligate), head of Flora right, wreathed with flowers, lituus behind; reverse two soldiers, facing each other, each holds a shield and a short sword upright, hilts touching, shield on right decorated with a star, CF right, CSEREIL in exergue; scarce; $100.00 (85.00)


Kolophon, Ionia, Late 6th Century B.C.

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Kolophon was once the strongest of the Ionian cities and renowned both for its cavalry and for the inhabitants' luxurious lifestyle until Gyges of Lydia conquered it in the 7th century B.C. Kolophon then went into decline and was eclipsed by neighboring Ephesus and by the rising naval power, Miletus.
GA85103. Silver tetartemorion, SNG Kayhan 343, SNGvA 1810, SNG Cop -, Milne Kolophon -, Rosen -, Klein -, EF, well centered, toned, slightly etched surfaces, weight 0.185 g, maximum diameter 5.8 mm, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, late 6th century B.C.; obverse head of Apollo left; reverse irregular quadripartite incuse square; $100.00 (85.00)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RS85599. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 3, RSC IV 173, Hunter III 8, SRCV III 8627, VF/aVF, centered on an unusually broad flan, fantastic portrait, light marks, die wear, edge cracks, weight 4.223 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 238 - 239 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PAX AVGVSTI (to the peace of the emperor), Pax standing front, head left, raising olive branch in right hand, long transverse scepter in left hand; ex Ancient Imports, ex Harlan J. Berk; $100.00 (85.00)




  



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Silver Under $100