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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Budget & Wholesale ▸ Silver Under $100View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Silver Coins Under $100

Coins are listed from highest price to lowest. If you are a serious bargain hunter, click the last page first and move backwards to the first page.


Ainos, Thrace, c. 427 - 424 B.C.

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Aenus, Enez, Turkey today, was on the southeastern coast of Thrace, near the mouth of the Hebrus River, not far from the Melas Gulf (modern Gulf of Saros), which is formed by the Thracian Chersonesus to the east. The city was said to be founded (or at least settled) by Aeolian migrants from Lesbos. Its mythical and eponymous founder was said to be Aeneus, a son of the god Apollo and father of Cyzicus. Another mythical ruler, named Poltys, son of Poseidon, entertained Heracles when he came to Aenus. In the Iliad, Homer mentions that the leaders of Troy's Thracian allies, Acamas and Peiros, came from Aenus.
GS68735. Silver diobol, May Ainos 176 - 204, AMNG II 303, SNG Cop 405, SNG Lockett 1164, Pozzi 1033, McClean 3892, F, grainy, weight 1.167 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 45o, Ainos (Enez, Turkey) mint, c. 427 - 424 B.C.; obverse head of Hermes right, wearing petasos; reverse AIN, goat standing to right, coiled snake (control symbol) lower right; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Herennia Etruscilla, Augusta July 249 - April/August 253 A.D.

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Pudicitia, modesty and chastity, was for Romans the highest regarded female virtue. For an unmarried girl, pudicitia meant virginity. For a wife, it meant faithfulness and devotion to her husband. Romans loved the story of Arria, an ultimate example of Roman pudicitia. When the emperor Claudius ordered her husband Paetus to end his own life, he hesitated. Arria took his dagger and stabbed herself to set an example, saying, "Paetus, it doesn't hurt."
RS69156. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 59b, RSC IV 19, Hunter III 10, SRCV III 9495, EF, sharp detail, well centered, weight 3.339 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 250 A.D.; obverse HER ETRVSCILLA AVG, draped bust right, crescent behind shoulders, wearing stephane, hair in horizontal ridges, plait looped at the back of neck; reverse PVDICITIA AVG, Pudicitia (modesty) seated left, drawing veil from face with right hand, scepter in left hand; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Soloi, Cilicia, c. 450 - 386 B.C.

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Soli (or Soloi) was a colony of Rhodes, founded c. 700 B.C. southwest of Tarsus, in Cilicia. It was destroyed in the 1st century B.C., and refounded by Pompey the Great as Pompeiopolis (not to be confused with the Pompeiopolis in Paphlagonia).
GS74432. Silver tetartemorion, BMC Lycaonia p. 148, 24; SNG BnF -, SNG Levante -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, Klein -, VF, nice style, well centered, toned, slightly grainy, weight 0.214 g, maximum diameter 6.3 mm, die axis 90o, Soloi mint, c. 450 - 386 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested helmet, earring, and necklace; reverse bunch of grapes within linear circle border, all in shallow round incuse; rare; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D.

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The estimated worldwide human population was about 257 million in 200 A.D. According to the United Nations, the worldwide human population reached 7 Billion on October 31, 2011.
SH73167. Silver denarius, RIC IV 18; RSC III 157b; BMCRE V p. 198, 234; SRCV II 7196, VF, weight 3.284 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, c. 200 A.D.; obverse P SEPT GETA CAES PONT, boy's bare-headed and draped bust right; reverse PRINC IVVENTVTIS (Prince of Youth), Geta standing left, baton in right hand, scepter in left hand, trophy of captured arms behind; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Philip

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Herakles is most often depicted on coinage wearing the scalp of the Nemean lion over his head. The first of Herakles' twelve labors, set by his cousin King Eurystheus, was to slay the Nemean lion and bring back its skin. Herakles discovered arrows and his club were useless against it because its golden fur was impervious to mortal weapons. Its claws were sharper than swords and could cut through any armor. Herakles stunned the beast with his club and, using his immense strength, strangled it to death. During the fight, the lion bit off one of his fingers. After slaying the lion, he tried to skin it with a knife from his belt but failed. Wise Athena, noticing the hero's plight, told him to use one of the lion's own claws to skin the pelt.
GS77213. Silver drachm, ADM II series IX, 173; Price P16; MŁller Alexander -; SNG Cop -; SNG Munchen -; SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, obverse off-center, porosity, weight 4.075 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 270o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 319 - 317 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long lotus topped scepter vertical behind in left hand, buckle left, crescent over A under throne; struck under Leonnatos, Arrhidaios, or Antigonos I Monophthalmos; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

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This coin is dedicated to the goddess Fides for her good quality of preserving the public peace by keeping the army true to its allegiance.
RS79558. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 32b, RSC IV 55, Hunter III 7, SRCV III 8932, VF, nice portrait, excellent centering and strike, frosty surfaces, edge cracks, weight 3.982 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 244 - 245 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse FIDES MILIT (the loyalty of the soldiers), Fides standing facing, head left, standard in each hand; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Neandreia, Troas, 5th Century B.C.

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Neandreia, Troas was located near the summit of Mount Chigri about 9 km east of Alexandria Troas. In 310 B.C., Antigonus I Monophthalmus founded Antigonia Troas (renamed Alexandria Troas by Lysimachos in 301 B.C.) and moved the citizens of nearby cities, including Neandreia to his new city. In the 1st century A.D., Pliny the Elder listed Neandreia among the settlements in the Troad which no longer existed.
GS84452. Silver obol, SNGvA 7627; SNG Munchen 292; SNG Tub 2650; BMC Troas, p. 73, 2; SNG Cop -; Klein -, VF, weight 0.601 g, maximum diameter 7.7 mm, die axis 180o, Neandreia (on Mount Chigri, Turkey) mint, 5th century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ram standing left, NEA above, reversed N lower left, all within incuse square; rare; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Venus (Aphrodite) can be faulted for the Trojan War. Upset that she was not invited to a wedding, she went anyway and maliciously left a golden apple inscribed "For the fairest" on the banquet table. The goddesses, as Aphrodite expected, argued who was the rightful possessor of this prize. It was determined the most handsome mortal in the world, a noble Trojan youth named Paris, would decide. Each of the three finalists offered Paris a bribe. Hera promised he would rule the world. Athena said she would make him victorious in battle. Aphrodite guaranteed the love of the most beautiful woman in the world. This was Helen, who was married to the king of Sparta. Paris awarded the golden apple to Aphrodite. Aphrodite enabled Paris to elope with Helen, Helen of Troy. Helen's husband raised a Greek army to retrieve his wife, starting the Trojan War.
RS84674. Silver denarius, RIC IV S580 (S); RSC III 198; BMCRE V p. 167, 85; SRCV II -, Hunter III -, VF, nice portrait, tight flan, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.625 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 198 - 200 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse VENVS FELIX (Venus who brings good fortune), Venus standing slightly left, head left, apple in extended right hand, drawing drapery from shoulder with left hand; scarce; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Cybele was born a hermaphrodite, but castrated by the gods, she became female. Heeding the Sibylline oracle, the senate brought her worship to Rome in 204 B.C. as the first officially sanctioned Eastern cult. After approval, they were dismayed to learn that the priesthood required voluntary self-castration, which was abhorrent to the Romans. Romans were barred from entering the priesthood or even entering the priest's sanctuary. The eunuch priests, recruited from outside Rome, were confined to their sanctuary, leaving only to parade in the streets during festivals in April. Claudius removed the bans on Roman participation, making worship of Cybele and her consort Attis part of the state religion.
RS84676. Silver denarius, RIC IV S564; RSC III 123; BMCRE V p. 163, S51; Hunter III p. 42, S11; SRCV II 6593, Choice VF, nice portrait, well centered and struck, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.747 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 205 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse MATER DEVM (mother of the gods), Cybele seated left between two lions, wearing towered crown, branch in right hand, scepter in left hand, resting left arm on drum; scarce; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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The antoninianus is named for Caracalla, who introduced it. If you are collecting one coin of each emperor, your Caracalla coin should be an antoninianus!

It was Sulla who in a dream first saw Venus as Venus Victrix (victorious Venus), with the weapons of Mars. He made her to his personal patroness. Pompey was inaugurating the cult of Venus Victrix in Rome. In the night before the battle of Pharsalus 48 B.C. Pompey was dreaming of Venus Victrix - seemingly a lucky sign -, whereas Caesar was sacrificing to Venus Genetrix, but issued as watchword 'Venus Victrix', and defeated Pompey!


RS85208. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 312c (S), BMCRE V p. 446, 86 var. (shield set on captive), RSC III 612b var. (same), Hunter III 57 var. (same), SRCV II 6785 var. (same), VF, well centered on a broad flan, excellent portrait, light corrosion, weight 5.459 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 215 - 217 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse VENVS VICTRIX (victorious Venus), Venus standing slightly left, breasts bare, helmet in extended right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, resting left forearm on grounded oval shield behind, flanked on each side by a captive seated facing outward, both captives propping head on right hand and resting right elbow on right knee; scarce; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00




  



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Silver Under $100