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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Galatia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Galatia

Galatia was named for Gauls from Thrace who settled there and became its ruling caste following the Gallic invasion of the Balkans in 279 B.C. The local Cappadocian population was left in control of the towns and most of the land, paying tithes to the new military aristocracy who kept aloof in fortified farmsteads, surrounded by their bands. These Celtic warriors were often hired as mercenary soldiers, sometimes fighting on both sides in the great battles of the times. For decades their war bands ravaged western Asia Minor. About 232 B.C. the Hellenized cities united under king Attalus I of Pergamum, defeated them, and forced them to confine themselves to Galatia. The Galatians were defeated by Rome in 189 B.C. and became a client state of Rome in 64 B.C. During his second missionary journey, St. Paul of Tarsus visited Galatia, where he was detained by sickness (Galatians 4:13). The Galatians were still speaking their language (Gaulish) in the 4th century A.D. Galatia

Galba, 3 April 68 - 15 January 69 A.D., Koinon of Galatia

|Galatia|, |Galba,| |3| |April| |68| |-| |15| |January| |69| |A.D.,| |Koinon| |of| |Galatia||AE| |21|
RP63431. Bronze AE 21, RPC I 3566 (citing only 2 examples); c/m: Howgego 348 (5 pcs), F, weight 6.918 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, obverse ΓAΛBAC CEBACTOC, bare head left, c/m: owl standing right in circular punch; reverse CEBACTWN, hexastyle temple, pellet in center intercolumniation, shield in pediment; rare type and countermark; ex CNG auction 206; lot 343, ex D. Alighieri Collection; SOLD


Kings of Galatia, Deiotaros, Tetrarch 63 - 59 B.C., King 59 - 40 B.C.

|Galatia|, |Kings| |of| |Galatia,| |Deiotaros,| |Tetrarch| |63| |-| |59| |B.C.,| |King| |59| |-| |40| |B.C.||AE| |27|
Deiotarus was chief of the Celtic Tolistobogii tribe in western Galatia and became King of Galatia. He was a faithful ally of Rome against Mithridates VI of Pontus, for which he was rewarded by Pompey. Caesar pardoned him for siding with Pompey in the civil war but he was deprived of some of his dominions. After Caesar's death, Mark Antony, for a large payment, publicly announced that, in accordance with instructions left by Caesar, Deiotarus was to resume possession of all the territory of which he had been deprived. When civil war broke out again, Deiotarus supported the anti-Caesarian party of Brutus and Cassius, but after the Battle of Philippi in 42 B.C., he went over to the triumvirs. He retained his kingdom until his death at a very advanced age.
GB88403. Bronze AE 27, SNGvA 6103 (same countermark); Arslan K4; SNG BnF 2333; BMC Galatia p. 1, 1; HGC 7 774 (R2); see RPC I p. 536, aVF, countermark VF, dark brown and green patina, off center, reverse flattened opposite countermark, weight 12.715 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Phrygian mint, 59 - 40 B.C.; obverse bust of winged Nike right, hair in a bunch behind; countermark: turreted head of Tyche in round punch; reverse eagle standing right on a sheathed sword, wings open, head turned back left, flanked by pilei of the Dioscuri each with a star above, BAΣIΛEΩΣ above, ∆HIOTAPOV below; very rare; SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Koinon of Galatia

|Trajan|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Koinon| |of| |Galatia||provincial| |sestertius|
A copy of the famous "Will" of Augustus is on the walls of the temple of Rome and Augustus at Ancyra, depicted on this coin.
RP45923. Orichalcum provincial sestertius, BMC Galatia p. 7, 10, SNG BnF 2427 - 2432 var. (legend variations), SNGvA 6121 - 6122 var. (same), VF, weight 20.562 g, maximum diameter 32.4 mm, die axis 45o, Galatia mint, magistrate Pomponius Bassus; obverse AYT NEP TPAIANOΣ KAIΣAP ΣE ΓEPM, laureate bust right; reverse KOINON ΓAΛATIAΣ EΠI ΠONΠΩNIOY BA, Hexastyle temple of Rome and Augustus at Ankyra, patera in ornamented pediment; SOLD







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REFERENCES|

Arslan, M. The Coins of Galatian Kingdom and the Roman Coinage of Ancyra in Galatia. (Ankara, 2004).
Arslan, M. "The Roman Coinage of Ancyra in Galatia" in Nomismata 1 (1997).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - ).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol III, Part 2. (London, 1926).
Grose, S. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Fitzwilliam Museum, Vol. III: Asia Minor, Farther Asia, Egypt, Africa. (Cambridge, 1929).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Anatolia, Pontos, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Phrygia, Galatia, Lykaonia, and Kappadokia...Fifth to First Centuries BC. HGC 7. (Lancaster, PA, 2012).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Zur griechischen und römischen Münzkunde. (Geneva, 1908).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Mionnet, T. Description de Médailles antiques grecques et romaines, Vol. IV. (Paris, 1809).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Volume 7: Cyprus to India. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, |Part 6: Phrygien-Kappadokien; Römische Provinzprägungen in Kleinasien. (Berlin, 1998).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 3: Pisidia, Lycaonia, Cilicia, Galatia, Cappadocia, Cyprus, [etc.]. (Berlin, 1964).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Cabinet des Médailles, Bibliothéque Nationale, Vol. 3: Pamphylia, Pisidia, Lycaonia, Galatia. (Paris, 1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Österreich, Sammlung Leypold, Kleinasiatische Münzen der Kaiserzeit. Vol. II: Phrygia - Commagene. (Vienna, 2004).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Galatia, Cappadocia, and Syria. (London, 1899).

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