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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Anatolia ▸ Phrygia ▸ ApameiaView Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Greek Coins of Apameia

Apamea is believed to be the Biblical city Shepham (Num. xxxiv. 11). After the Mithridatic Wars it became a great center for trade, largely carried on by resident Italians and Jews. Apamea is mentioned in the Talmud (Ber. 62a, Niddah, 30b and Yeb. 115b). By order of Flaccus, nearly 45 kilograms of gold, intended by Jews for the Temple in Jerusalem was confiscated in Apamea in 62 B.C. On the outbreak of the Jewish War, the inhabitants of Apamea spared the Jews who lived in their midst, and would not suffer them to be murdered or led into captivity (Josephus, Bell. Jud. ii. 18, § 5). Great Colonnade at Apamea


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Apamea, Phrygia

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Apamea is believed to be the Biblical city Shepham (Num. xxxiv. 11). After the Mithridatic Wars it became a great center for trade, largely carried on by resident Italians and Jews. Apamea is mentioned in the Talmud (Ber. 62a, Niddah, 30b and Yeb. 115b). By order of Flaccus, nearly 45 kilograms of gold, intended by Jews for the Temple in Jerusalem was confiscated in Apamea in 62 B.C. On the outbreak of the Jewish War, the inhabitants of Apamea spared the Jews who lived in their midst, and would not suffer them to be murdered or led into captivity (Josephus, Bell. Jud. ii. 18, § 5).

This type, the only issue by Apamea in the Flavian Period, may have been issued to finance recovery from an earthquake and fire mentioned by Suetonius (Vesp. 17).
Great Colonnade at Apamea
RP77369. Bronze AE 26, RPC II 1389; SNG Cop 210; SNGvA 3491; SNG Munchen 152; BMC Phrygia p. 95, 150, Fair, nice portrait for grade, nice green patina, weight 9.728 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 0o, Apamea of Syria mint, struck under Plancius Varus, Praetorian Legate; obverse AYTOKPATΩP KAIΣAP ΣEBAΣTOΣ OYEΣΠAΣIANOΣ, laureate head right; reverse EΠI ΠΛANKIOY OYAPOY KOINON ΦPYΓIAΣ AΠAMEIΣ, bundle of five stalks of grain; $75.00 (€63.75)
 


Apameia, Phrygia, c. 133 - 48 B.C.

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Artemis was a goddess of virginity, women's concerns, the hunt and the underworld. The enigmatic cult statue covered in apparent fertility symbols was a unique combination of the Greek virgin-huntress Artemis with an indigenous Anatolian goddess.
GB70874. Bronze AE 22, BMC Phrygia p. 84, 88; SGCV II 5121, aVF, weight 6.209 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, Apameia mint, c. 133 - 48 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse AΠAME − MHNO∆O/MENEMA, cultus-statue of Artemis Anaitis facing; $40.00 (€34.00)
 


Apameia, Phrygia, 150 - 140 B.C.

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Apameia was named for Apama, the mother of the founder, the Seleucid king Antiochos I.

The cista mystica was a basket used for housing sacred snakes in connection with the initiation ceremony into the cult of Bacchus (Dionysus). In the Dionysian mysteries a snake, representing the god and possibly symbolic of his phallus, was carried in a cista mystica on a bed of vine leaves. The cista in the mysteries of Isis may also have held a serpent, perhaps associated with the missing phallus of Osiris.
SH63587. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Kleiner-Noe, issue XI, 21; SNGvA 3451 and 8333; cf. BMC Phrygia p. 69, 7 (no star); SNG Cop -, VF, uneven toning, weight 12.522 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 0o, Apameia (Dinar, Turkey) mint, 150 - 140 B.C.; obverse Cista mystica with half open lid, from which a snake emerges left, all within ivy wreath; reverse two coiled serpents with heads erect, between them an ornamented bow-case with strap on right, bow sticking out from the top left side of case, snake on the right wrapped around two flutes, AΠA monogram left, pileus surmounted by star right; interesting ornate cista mystica; SOLD







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REFERENCES

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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain III, R.C. Lockett Collection, Part 5: Lesbos - Cyrenaica. Addenda. (gold and silver). (London, 1949).
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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IX, British Museum, Part 1: The Black Sea. (London, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XI, The William Stancomb Collection of Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Oxford, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, Univ. of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain-Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Österreich, Sammlung Leypold, Kleinasiatische Münzen der Kaiserzeit, Vol. II: Phrygia-Commagene. (Vienna, 2004).
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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 5: Tire Museum (Izmir), Vol. 1: Roman Provincial Coins From Ionia, Lydia, Phrygia, etc. (Istanbul, 2011).

Catalog current as of Saturday, October 21, 2017.
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Apameia