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Home>Catalog>RomanCoins>TheTwelveCaesars>Augustus PAGE 1/4123»»»

Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

Octavian Augustus, the first and possibly greatest Roman emperor, founded the Roman empire after defeating Mark Antony and Cleopatra. He reformed the coinage and the military, and embarked on a huge building program all across the empire. Augustus was succeeded by his stepson Tiberius after a long reign of 41 years. He was 77, having ruled from 27 B.C. to 14 A.D.


Click for a larger photo The inscriptions tell us this coin was dedicated by the senate and people of Rome to Augustus for improving the roads. Augustus improved many roads around Rome and personally financed and directed work on the Via Flaminia and the Milvian Bridge over the Tiber, where he erected statues and triumphal arches in his own honor. In Hispania, the old via Herculea was renamed Via Augusta shortly after Augustus' stay in Tarraco in 27 B.C., perhaps indicating he made improvements to the road during his visit.
SH66803. Silver denarius, RIC I 142 (R4), RSC I 235, BMCRE I 435, SRCV I -, VF, slightly grainy, weight 3.374 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Hispania, Tarraco(?) mint, 17 - 16 B.C.; obverse S P Q R AVGVSTO CAESARI, bare head left; reverse QVOD VIAE MVN SVNT, legend in four lines between two arches atop a viaduct, each bearing an equestrian statue facing center and a trophy; among the very rarest Augustus' denarii; extremely rare; $1450.00 (€1087.50)

Thessalonica, Macedonia, Julius Caesar, and Augustus, c. 27 B.C. - 14 A.D. (Possibly Later)
Click for a larger photo RPC tentatively dates the type to the reign of Augustus but notes it may have been struck as late as the reign of Domitian.
SH67650. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 1555; BMC Macedonia p. 115, 60; cf. SNG Cop 395 (Julius Caesar laureate); SGICV I 151 (same), aVF, excellent portrait of Caesar, weight 8.171 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, c. 27 B.C. - 14 A.D. (Possibly Later); obverse ΘEOC, bare head of Julius Caesar right; reverse ΘECCAΛONI KEΩN, bare head of Augustus right; $400.00 (€300.00)

Thessalonica, Macedonia, Julius Caesar, and Augustus, c. 27 B.C. - 14 A.D. (Possibly Later)
Click for a larger photo RPC tentatively dates the type to the reign of Augustus but notes it may have been struck as late as the reign of Domitian.
SH67794. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 1555; BMC Macedonia p. 115, 60; cf. SNG Cop 395 (Julius Caesar laureate); SGICV I 151 (same), VF, weight 7.039 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonika mint, c. 27 B.C. - 14 A.D. (Possibly Later); obverse ΘEOC, bare head of Julius Caesar right; reverse ΘECCAΛONI KEΩN, bare head of Augustus right; $330.00 (€247.50)

Cyprus, Time of Augustus, 27 B.C. - 14 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Augustus' sun sign was Libra. We don't know why he selected the Capricorn as his emblem. Perhaps Capricorn was either his rising sign or his Moon sign. Popular astrology, of the newspaper kind, is sun sign astrology. The ancients tended to attach more importance to the Moon sign and rising sign. Perhaps Augustus selected the Capricorn because it is associated with stern moral authority. Tiberius (born Nov. 13) was a Scorpio.
SH59392. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 3916, SNG Cop -, aVF, weight 2.854 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 315o, Cypriot mint, obverse capricorn right, star above; reverse scorpion left, star above; $260.00 (€195.00)

Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Restitution Issue Under Trajan(?)
Click for a larger photo Augustus with Gaius and Lucius denarii with this unusual style, and some apparently from the same dies, have been attributed to in sales and auction listings an anonymous restitution under Trajan. The well-known normal restitution issues are, however, identified by modified legends. On this type the legend has not been changed from Augustus' issue. In addition, at Rome, an engraver should have know the correct form of the tools of the pontiff and augur. Perhaps these coins are ancient counterfeits or imitatives.
RS68469. Billon denarius, BMCRE I 536, and pl. 13, 18 (attributed to the reign of Augustus, Lugdunum mint), F, debased silver, dark toning, weight 2.930 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 315o, Rome(?) mint, Restitution issue struck under Trajan; obverse AVGVSTI F COS DESIG CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE, laureate head right, one tie over neck; reverse AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT, Adult-proportioned Caius and Lucius Caesar standing togate, shields and spears between, and holding volumina, above, simpulum to left, on left, and lituus with split base to right, on right; very rare; $250.00 (€187.50)

Click for a larger photo The brothers Caius (the eldest, pictured on this coin) and Lucius were the sons of Agrippa and Julia, daughter of Augustus. They were due to succeed Augustus but predeceased him in 4 and 2 A.D. respectively.
SH64488. Silver denarius, RIC I 199, BMCRE I 500, RSC I 40, F, toned, weight 3.483 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 270o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 8 B.C.; obverse AVGVSTVS DIVI•F, laureate head right; reverse C•CAESAR, AVGVS•F in ex, Caius Caesar galloping right on horseback, holding sword and shield, legionary eagle and two standards behind; $215.00 (€161.25)

Kingdom of Thrace, Rhoemetalces I, c. 11 B.C. - 12 A.D., Augustus Reverse
Click for a larger photo When the Cotys VII, King of Thrace, died about 48 B.C. Rhoemetalces became the guardian of his nephew Rhescuporis I, his brother's young son and heir. In 13 B.C., Rhescuporis I was defeated and slain in battle by Vologases, chief of the Thracian Bessi, who was leading a revolt against the Romans. After the revolt, as Rhescuporis I had left no heir, Rhoemetalces became king in 12 B.C. The Roman Historian Tacitus described him as attractive and civilized. Rhoemetalces I ruled Thrace until his death in 12 A.D. Augustus then divided his realm into two kingdoms, one half for his son Cotys VIII and the other half for Rhoemetalces’s brother Rhescuporis II. Tacitus states that Cotys received the cultivated parts, most towns and most Greek cities of Thrace, while Rhescuporis received the wild and savage portion with enemies on its frontier.
SH63439. Bronze AE 26, Youroukova 204 - 8; RPC I 1711; BMC Thrace 4; Weber 2743, gVF, countermark on obv, weight 10.33 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, die axis 180o, obverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ POIMHTAΛKOY, jugate heads of Rhoemetalces I, diademed, and Queen Pythodoris right, countermark; reverse KAIΣAPOΣ ΣEBAΣTOY, bare head of Augustus right; ex CNG auction 159, lot 137; ex Garth R. Drewry Collection; ex Alex G. Malloy XVIII (1 December 1980), lot 663; $180.00 (€135.00)

Thessalonica, Macedonia, Julius Caesar, and Augustus, c. 27 B.C. - 14 A.D. (Possibly Later)
Click for a larger photo RPC tentatively dates the type to the reign of Augustus but notes it may have been struck as late as the reign of Domitian.
RP65932. Bronze AE 22, RPC I 1555; BMC Macedonia p. 115, 60, F, weight 6.623 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 270o, Thessalonika mint, obverse ΘEOC, bare head of Julius Caesar right; reverse ΘECCAΛONI KEΩN, bare head of Augustus right; $180.00 (€135.00)

Sabratha, Africa, c. 8 - 14 A.D., Augustus Reverse
Click for a larger photo
Sabratha is on the Mediterranean coast about 66 km west of Tripoli, Libya. It was a Tyrian or Carthaginian settlement, the farthest of the west of the three chief cities of Syrtica, with a prosperous harbor. It became a colony in the second century A.D., perhaps under Trajan. Septimius Severus was born nearby in Leptis Magna, and Sabratha reached its peak under the Severans. The city was badly damaged by earthquakes in the 4th century, particularly the quake of 365. Within a hundred years of the Arab conquest of the Maghreb, trade had shifted to other ports and Sabratha dwindled to a village.Roman Theater of Sabratha

RP68109. Bronze AE 23, RPC 814, aF/F, weight 8.357 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 0o, Syrtica mint, c. 8 - 14 A.D.; obverse neo-Punic Inscription: SBRT'N (behind), bust of Serapis right, neo-Punic R (initial of suffete) before; reverse CAESAR, bare head of Augustus right, lituus before; rare; $175.00 (€131.25)

Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Abdera, Thrace
Click for a larger photo In ancient Athens it was proverbial to ridicule Abdera by saying that the air in Abdera causes stupidity. But Abdera counted among its citizens the philosophers Democritus, Protagoras and Anaxarchus, historian and philosopher Hecataeus of Abdera, and the lyric poet Anacreon.
SH68886. Bronze AE 22, RPC I 1730, Varbanov II 7 (R6), AMNG II 244, SNG Cop 382, SGICV 485, aVF, some corrosion, weight 4.523 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Abdera mint, 63 - 68 A.D.; obverse NEPΩNI KΛAY∆IΩ KAIΣAPI ΣEBAΣTOY, bare head of Nero left; reverse ΘEΩ AB∆HPEITAI, bare head of Augustus (or Claudius) left; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Harlan J. Berk; scarce; $175.00 (€131.25)



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Obverse legends:

AVGVSTVS
AVGVSTVSDIVIF
AVGVSTVSTRPOT
AVGVSTVSTRPOTVII
CAESARAVGPONTMAXTRIBVNICPOT
CAESARAVGTRIBVNPOTES
CAESARAVGVSTPONTMAXTRIBVNICPOT
CAESARAVGVSTVS
CAESARAVGVSTVSDIVIF
CAESARAVGVSTVS DIVIFPATERPATRIAE
CAESARAVGVSTVSSPQR
CAESARAVGVSTVSTRIBVNICPOTEST
CAESARAVGVSTVSTRPOT
CAESARAVGTRIBVNPOTES
CAESARCOSVI
CAESARDIVIFCOSVI
CAESARIAVGVSTO
CAESARIMP
CAESARIMPVII
CAESARIIIVIRRPC
CAESARPONTMAX
CCAESARIIIVIRRPC
CCAESARIMP
CCAESARIIIVIRRPC
DIVOAVGVSTO
DIVOAVGVSTOSPQR
DIVOAVGVSTOSPQROBCIVESSER
DIVVSAVGVSTVS
DIVVSAVGVSTVSPATER
DIVVSAVGVSTVSSC
DIVIIVLIF
GALVSMESSALLAIIIVIR
IMPCAESAR
IMPCAESARAVGVST
IMPCAESARAVGVSTTRPOTIIX
IMPCAESARDIVIF
IMPCAESARDIVIFAVGVSTVSIMPXX
IMPCAESARDIVIFCOSVILIBERTATISPRVINDEX
IMP CAESAR DIVI F III VIR ITER
IMP CAESAR DIVI F VIR ITER R P C
IMP CAESARI
IMP CAESAR DIVI IVLI
IMP IX TR POV
LAMIASILIVSANNIVS
OB CIVIS SERVATOS
PBETILIENVSBASSVS
PVLCHERTAVRVSREGVLVS
SCOBRPCVMSALVTIMPCAESARAVGCONS
S P Q R IMP CAESARI
S P Q R IMP CAESARI AVG COS XI TR POT VI
S P Q R PARENT CONSSVO










Rarity of Denominations, Average Weights of Well Preserved Coins, and Other Information:

 
Gold aureus

Silver denarius

Silver quinarius

Sestertius with his head

Sestertius without his head

As and Dupondius
S

C

R1

R2

R1

C


3.82 grams (97.5% silver)



Catalog current as of Sunday, April 20, 2014.
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Roman Coins of Augustus