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Home>Catalog>RomanCoins>TheTwelveCaesars>Augustus PAGE 1/3123»»»

Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

Octavian Augustus, the first and possibly greatest Roman emperor, founded the Roman empire after defeating Mark Antony and Cleopatra. He reformed the coinage and the military, and embarked on a huge building program all across the empire. Augustus was succeeded by his stepson Tiberius after a long reign of 41 years. He was 77, having ruled from 27 B.C. to 14 A.D.


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Uncertain Mint, Anatolia or Syria
Click for a larger photo The mint, the questor who struck this type, and even the identity of the person in the portrait remain uncertain. The type has previously been attributed to Macedonia and the portrait identified as Brutus (Friedlander) or Caesar (Grant). David Sear notes the type has never been found in Macedonia. Finds point to Syria or Anatolia. It is possible that the type was issued, with his own portrait, by Sosius, a general under Marc Antony who was quaestor in 39 B.C. Much more likely, however, the portrait is of Augustus.
RB71004. Bronze AE 24, RPC I 5409; Sear Imperators 957 (Syria); AMNG II 29 (Pella), F, green patina, weight 17.823 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain Anatolian or Syrian mint, obverse bare head right; reverse hasta (spear), sella questoria (questor's seat of office), and fiscus (imperial treasury), Q (for questor) below; previously a rare type but recent finds have made it somewhat easier to aquire; $450.00 (€337.50)

Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Struck under Tiberius
Click for a larger photo Octavian Augustus, the first and possibly greatest Roman emperor, founded the empire after defeating Mark Antony and Cleopatra. He reformed the coinage and military, and embarked on a huge building program across the empire. He died at 77 years, having ruled 27 B.C. to 14 A.D.
RB72083. Bronze sestertius, RIC I Tiberius 56, 62 or 68, aF, brown and green patina, rough, scrape on reverse, weight 25.608 g, maximum diameter 33.7 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 35 - 36 A.D.; obverse DIVO / AVGVSTO / S P Q R in upper field, statue of Augustus seated left on throne, holding laurel branch and scepter, set on ornate car drawn by four elephants, each with its own mahout; reverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST P M TR POT XXXVII, large S C, legend around; ex CNG auction 284 (8 Aug 2012), lot 278; ex the R. D. Frederick Collection; $240.00 (€180.00)

Cyprus, Time of Augustus, 27 B.C. - 14 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Augustus' sun sign was Libra. We don't know why he selected the Capricorn as his emblem. Perhaps Capricorn was either his rising sign or his Moon sign. Popular astrology, of the newspaper kind, is sun sign astrology. The ancients tended to attach more importance to the Moon sign and rising sign. Perhaps Augustus selected the Capricorn because it is associated with stern moral authority. Tiberius (born Nov. 13) was a Scorpio.
SH59392. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 3916, SNG Cop -, aVF, weight 2.854 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 315o, Cypriot mint, obverse capricorn right, star above; reverse scorpion left, star above; $200.00 (€150.00)

Click for a larger photo The X on the reverse above the shields is only present on a very small percentage of the coins of this type. This type is an alternate possible Tribute Penny.
SH72536. Silver denarius, RSC I 43a, SRCV I 1597 var, RIC I 211, BMCRE I 537, VF, dark thick toning, weight 3.771 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 2 B.C. - 5 A.D.; obverse CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE, laureate head right; reverse C L CAESARES AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT, Gaius and Lucius Caesars togate stand facing, each resting hand on a round shield with spear behind, X in center, above center on left a simpulum right and on right a lituus left; scarce; $200.00 (€150.00)

Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Abdera, Thrace
Click for a larger photo In ancient Athens it was proverbial to ridicule Abdera by saying that the air in Abdera causes stupidity. But Abdera counted among its citizens the philosophers Democritus, Protagoras and Anaxarchus, historian and philosopher Hecataeus of Abdera, and the lyric poet Anacreon.
SH68886. Bronze AE 22, RPC I 1730, Varbanov II 7 (R6), AMNG II 244, SNG Cop 382, SGICV 485, aVF, some corrosion, weight 4.523 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Abdera mint, 63 - 68 A.D.; obverse NEPΩNI KΛAY∆IΩ KAIΣAPI ΣEBAΣTOY, bare head of Nero left; reverse ΘEΩ AB∆HPEITAI, bare head of Augustus (or Claudius) left; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Harlan J. Berk; scarce; $175.00 (€131.25)

Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Moneyer C. Plotius Rufus
Click for a larger photo The wreath on the reverse is the corona civica, the oak wreath awarded to Roman citizens ex senatus consulto (by special decree of the Senate) for saving the life of another citizen by slaying an enemy in battle. It became a prerogative for Roman emperors to be awarded the Civic Crown, originating with Augustus, who was awarded it in 27 B.C. for saving the lives of citizens by ending the series of civil wars.
RB65443. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC I 388, BMCRE I 150, Cohen 502, SRCV I 1663, F, scrapes, uneven strike, weight 9.693 g, maximum diameter 26.2 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 15 B.C.; obverse AVGVSTVS TRIBVNIC POTEST, legend in three lines within oak wreath; reverse C PLOTIVS RVFVS III VIR A A A F F, legend surrounding large S C; $160.00 (€120.00)

Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Calagurris, Hispania Tarraconensis
Click for a larger photo Under Roman rule many cities were administered by a pair of magistrates called duumvirs. The inscription tells us this coin was struck in the Municipium Calagurris Iulia, under the duumvirs C. Sempronius Barba and Q. Baebius Flavus. In imperial times, cities sometimes honored the emperor by making him one of the two duumvirs.
RP90901. Bronze AE 29, RPC I 447, Villaronga-Benages 3127, SNG Cop 584, SNG Tübingen 18, SNG München 53, VF, green patina with red earthen highlighting, old scratches on bull, weight 12.121 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 45o, Calagurris mint, 2 B.C. - 14 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR AVGVSTVS P P, laureate head right; reverse bull standing right on ground line, M CAL I (downward on left), C SEMP BARBA III (above), Q BAEB FLAVO (in exergue), II / VIR (in two lines on right); $140.00 (€105.00)

Thessalonica, Macedonia, Julius Caesar, and Augustus, c. 27 B.C. - 14 A.D. (Possibly Later)
Click for a larger photo RPC tentatively dates the type to the reign of Augustus but notes it may have been struck as late as the reign of Domitian.
RP70490. Bronze AE 23, RPC I 1555; BMC Macedonia p. 115, 60; cf. SNG Cop 395 (Julius Caesar laureate); SGICV I 151 (same), F+, weight 8.287 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, c. 27 B.C. - 14 A.D. (Possibly Later); obverse ΘEOC, bare head of Julius Caesar right; reverse ΘECCAΛONI KEΩN, bare head of Augustus right; $135.00 (€101.25)

Kingdom of Thrace, Rhoemetalces I, c. 11 B.C. - 12 A.D., Augustus Reverse
Click for a larger photo When the Cotys VII, King of Thrace, died about 48 B.C. Rhoemetalces I became the guardian of his nephew Rhescuporis I, his brother's young son and heir. In 13 B.C., Rhescuporis I was defeated and slain in battle by Vologases, chief of the Thracian Bessi, who was leading a revolt against Rome. As Rhescuporis I had left no heir, Rhoemetalces became king. An ally of Augustus, the Roman Historian Tacitus described Rhoemetalces as attractive and civilized. After his death, Augustus divided his realm, half for his son Cotys VIII and the other half for Rhoemetalces' brother Rhescuporis II. Tacitus states that Cotys received the cultivated parts, most towns and most Greek cities of Thrace, while Rhescuporis received the wild and savage portion with enemies on its frontier.
RP71346. Bronze AE 20, RPC I 1718, Youroukova 194, SNG Cop 1192; SNG Evelpidis 1124; BMC Thrace p. 209, 7, gVF, nice green patina, weight 4.573 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 180o, c. 11 B.C. - 12 A.D.; obverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ POIMHTAΛKOY, diademed head of Rhoemetalces I right; reverse KAIΣAPOΣ ΣEBAΣTOY, bare head of Augustus right; $130.00 (€97.50)

Click for a larger photo  
RP64022. Bronze as, RPC I 2235 (CA coinage, Class 2, mint uncertain), RIC I 486 (Asia Mint), VF, weight 8.407 g, maximum diameter 24.92 mm, die axis 0o, Asia, Uncertain mint, c. 25 B.C.; obverse CAESAR, bare head right; reverse AVGVSTVS, legend in one line in laurel wreath; $125.00 (€93.75)



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Obverse legends:

AVGVSTVS
AVGVSTVSDIVIF
AVGVSTVSTRPOT
AVGVSTVSTRPOTVII
CAESARAVGPONTMAXTRIBVNICPOT
CAESARAVGTRIBVNPOTES
CAESARAVGVSTPONTMAXTRIBVNICPOT
CAESARAVGVSTVS
CAESARAVGVSTVSDIVIF
CAESARAVGVSTVS DIVIFPATERPATRIAE
CAESARAVGVSTVSSPQR
CAESARAVGVSTVSTRIBVNICPOTEST
CAESARAVGVSTVSTRPOT
CAESARAVGTRIBVNPOTES
CAESARCOSVI
CAESARDIVIFCOSVI
CAESARIAVGVSTO
CAESARIMP
CAESARIMPVII
CAESARIIIVIRRPC
CAESARPONTMAX
CCAESARIIIVIRRPC
CCAESARIMP
CCAESARIIIVIRRPC
DIVOAVGVSTO
DIVOAVGVSTOSPQR
DIVOAVGVSTOSPQROBCIVESSER
DIVVSAVGVSTVS
DIVVSAVGVSTVSPATER
DIVVSAVGVSTVSSC
DIVIIVLIF
GALVSMESSALLAIIIVIR
IMPCAESAR
IMPCAESARAVGVST
IMPCAESARAVGVSTTRPOTIIX
IMPCAESARDIVIF
IMPCAESARDIVIFAVGVSTVSIMPXX
IMPCAESARDIVIFCOSVILIBERTATISPRVINDEX
IMP CAESAR DIVI F III VIR ITER
IMP CAESAR DIVI F VIR ITER R P C
IMP CAESARI
IMP CAESAR DIVI IVLI
IMP IX TR POV
LAMIASILIVSANNIVS
OB CIVIS SERVATOS
PBETILIENVSBASSVS
PVLCHERTAVRVSREGVLVS
SCOBRPCVMSALVTIMPCAESARAVGCONS
S P Q R IMP CAESARI
S P Q R IMP CAESARI AVG COS XI TR POT VI
S P Q R PARENT CONSSVO










Rarity of Denominations, Average Weights of Well Preserved Coins, and Other Information:

 
Gold aureus

Silver denarius

Silver quinarius

Sestertius with his head

Sestertius without his head

As and Dupondius
S

C

R1

R2

R1

C


3.82 grams (97.5% silver)



Catalog current as of Sunday, December 21, 2014.
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Roman Coins of Augustus