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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Medieval & Modern Coins ▸ United KingdomView Options:  |  |  | 

Coins of the United Kingdom

Anglo-Gallic, Edward III, 1327 - 1377

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Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most efficient military powers in Europe. His reign saw vital developments in the evolution of the English parliament, the ravages of the Black Death and the beginning of the Hundred Years' War. He remained on the throne for 50 years.

The outer obverse legend abbreviates, "BENEDICTUM SIT NOMEN DOMINI NOSTRI DEI IHESU CHRISTI," which means, "Blessed be the name of the Lord our God, Jesus Christ."
ME85375. Silver Gros Tournois a la Porte, SCBC 8063, Elias 63, Duplessy Féodales 1067, Elias Collection 120, Poey d'Avant 2856, Boudeau –, gF, toned, tight flan, weight 2.478 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 270o, 1351 - 1356; obverse ED'· REX : A*nGLIE / + BnDICTV · SIT · nOmE : DnI : nRI : DEI : IhV · XPI (annulet and double annulet stops, secret mark: asterisk between A and n), short cross pattée; reverse + DVX : AQITA*nIE (double annulet stops, secret mark: asterisk between A and n), châtel aquitanique, gateway below; all within tressure of arches containing twelve leaves; rare; $265.00 (€225.25)
 


United Kingdom, George IV, 29 January 1820 - 26 June 1830

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From 1811 until his accession, George IV served as regent during his father's mental illness. He forbade his wife from attending his coronation and unsuccessfully attempted to divorce her, which brought the contempt of the people. For most of George's regency and reign, Prime Minister Lord Liverpool controlled the government with little help from George. George's extravagant lifestyle and wasteful spending angered taxpayers at a time when Britain was fighting the Napoleonic Wars. He did not provide leadership in a time of crisis, nor did he act as a role model for his people. Liverpool led Britain's ultimate victory, negotiated the peace settlement, and attempted to deal with the social and economic malaise that followed. George IV was succeeded by his younger brother William.
UK84145. Silver shilling, SCBC 3812, aEF, toned, reeded edge, weight 5.668 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 180o, Tower mint, 1825; obverse GEORGIUS IV DE GRATIA 1825 (George IV, by the grace of God, 1825), bare head left; reverse BRITANNIARUM REX FID ET DEFENSOR (King of The British territories, Defender of the Faith), crowned lion standing left, atop a larger crown; rose, shamrock, and thistle below; $160.00 (€136.00)
 


United Kingdom, Victoria, 20 June 1837 - 22 January 1901

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Queen Victoria inherited the throne at 18, after her father's three elder brothers had all died leaving no legitimate, surviving children. The UK was already a constitutional monarchy, in which the Sovereign held relatively little direct political power. Privately, Victoria attempted to influence government policy and ministerial appointments. Publicly, she became a national icon and was identified with strict standards of personal morality. Her reign of 63 years and seven months, which is longer than that of any other British monarch and the longest of any female monarch in history, is known as the Victorian era.
UK84151. Silver shilling, SCBC 3927, UNC, toned, reeded edge, weight 5.643 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 0o, Tower mint, 1889; obverse VICTORIA DEI GRATIA BRITT REGINA F: D: (Victoria, by the grace of God, Queen of the British Territories, Defender of the Faith), Jubilee bust left, large head variety, crowned, veiled and draped; reverse crowned shield with arms in garter inscribed HONI SOIT QVI MAL Y PENSE (shamed be he who thinks evil of it), 18-87 below; $125.00 (€106.25)
 


United Kingdom, Victoria, 20 June 1837 - 22 January 1901

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The double florin was one of the shortest-lived British coin denominations ever, only being produced during four mint years, between 1887 and 1890. The coin acquired the nickname of "Barmaid's Grief" due to its similarity to the slightly larger crown coin (worth 5 shillings, 25% more than the double florin), as neither coin was marked with its denomination and both used an identical portrait of Queen Victoria on the obverse.
UK84147. Silver Double Florin, SCBC 3923, EF, toned, a few marks, scratches, reeded edge, weight 22.600 g, maximum diameter 35.9 mm, die axis 0o, Tower mint, 1887; obverse VICTORIA DEI GRATIA (Victoria, by the grace of God), Jubilee bust left, crowned, veiled, and draped; reverse FID: - DEF: - BRITT: - REG: 18-87 (Defender of the Faith, Queen of the British Territories, Arabic 1 in date), Coat of arms comprised of four crowned shields (England (x2), Scotland, and Ireland) in cruciform arrangement, the four crowns dividing the legend and date, scepters between the shields; $120.00 (€102.00)
 


United Kingdom, Victoria, 20 June 1837 - 22 January 1901

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Queen Victoria inherited the throne at 18, after her father's three elder brothers had all died, leaving no legitimate surviving children. The UK was already a constitutional monarchy, in which the Sovereign held relatively little direct political power. Privately, Victoria attempted to influence government policy and ministerial appointments. Publicly, she became a national icon and was identified with strict standards of personal morality. Her reign of 63 years and seven months, which is longer than that of any other British monarch and the longest of any female monarch in history, is known as the Victorian era.
UK86148. Silver Florin, SCBC 3925, EF, proof-like, very light marks, weight 11.280 g, maximum diameter 29.3 mm, die axis 0o, Tower mint, 1887; obverse VICTORIA DEI GRATIA (Victoria, by the grace of God), Jubilee bust left, crowned, veiled, and draped; reverse FID: - DEF: - BRITT: - REG: I8-87 (Defender of the Faith, Queen of the British Territories), four crowned shields (arms of England (x2), Scotland, and Ireland) in a cruciform arrangement around a rayed Garter Star, scepter in each angle between the shields, the four crowns dividing the legend and date; $110.00 (€93.50)
 


United Kingdom, Victoria, 20 June 1837 - 22 January 1901

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Queen Victoria inherited the throne at 18, after her father's three elder brothers had all died, leaving no legitimate surviving children. The UK was already a constitutional monarchy, in which the Sovereign held relatively little direct political power. Privately, Victoria attempted to influence government policy and ministerial appointments. Publicly, she became a national icon and was identified with strict standards of personal morality. Her reign of 63 years and seven months, which is longer than that of any other British monarch and the longest of any female monarch in history, is known as the Victorian era.
UK84148. Silver half crown, SCBC 3924, EF, nice rosy toning, a few light marks, reeded edge, weight 14.156 g, maximum diameter 32.1 mm, die axis 0o, Tower mint, 1887; obverse VICTORIA DEI GRATIA (Victoria, by the grace of God), Jubilee bust left, crowned, veiled and draped; reverse BRITANNIARUM REGINA FID DEF (Queen of the British Territories, Defender of the Faith), crowned shield with arms in garter and collar, HONI SOIT QVI MAL Y PENSE (shamed be he who thinks evil of it) on the garter, 18-87 in the margin, at the bottom, divided by St. George slaying dragon; $105.00 (€89.25)
 


The Voided Long-Cross Coinage 1247-1279 Henry III & Edward I

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An illustrated guide to identification.
BL14761. The Voided Long-Cross Coinage 1247-1279 by Christopher R Wren, Spink, 2006, 82 pages, paperback; $32.00 (€27.20)
 


Coins of England & the United Kingdom - Pre-Decimal Issues 2016

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51st edition of the standard catalogue of British pre-decimal issue coins.
BK12923. Coins of England & the United Kingdom - Pre-Decimal Issues, Spink, 2016, 4159 coins, i-xvi, 540 pages, color illustrated, hardback, new; $22.00 (€18.70)
 


Coins of Scotland Ireland and the Islands - Pre-decimal Issues 2003

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Second edition of the standard catalogue of British pre-decimal issue coins for Scotland, Ireland and the Islands (Jersey, Guernsey, Man and Lundy)
BK12925. Coins of Scotland Ireland and the Islands - Pre-decimal Issues, Spink, 2003, 219 pages, color illustrated, hardcover, new; $13.00 (€11.05)
 


Coins of England & the United Kingdom - Decimal Issues

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Standard catalogue of British coins by denomination. A second edition to the 2015 catalogue due to the quantity of commemorative issues released in 2015.
BK12931. Coins of England & the United Kingdom - Decimal Issues, Spink, 2016, 173 pages, color illustrated, paperback, new; $6.00 (€5.10)
 







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REFERENCES

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Brown, I., C. Comber, & W. Wilkinson. The Hammered Silver Coins Produced at the Tower Mint During the Reign of Elizabeth I. (Llanfyllin, 2012).
Bull, M. English Silver Coinage Since 1649. (London, 2015).
Davies, P. British Silver Coins Since 1816. (1982).
Elias, E. The Anglo-Gallic Coins. (Paris/London, 1984).
Everson, T. The Galata Guide to the Farthing Tokens of James I and Charles I: A History and Reclassification. (Llanfyllin, 2008).
Freeman, M. Bronze Coinage of Great Britain. (London, 1985).
Krause C. & Mishler, C. Standard Catalog of World Coins. (Iola, WI, 2010 - )
Lawrence, L. "The Coinage of Edward III from 1351" in NC 1926, 1929, 1932, 1933.
Marsh, M. The Gold Half Sovereign. (Cambridge, 2004).
Marsh, M. The Gold Sovereign. (Cambridge, 2002).
Mass, J. Mass Collection, English Short Cross Coins, 1180-1247. SCBI 56. (Oxford, 2001).
Montagu, H. The copper, tin and bronze coinage and patterns for coins of England, from the reign of Elizabeth to that of Her present Majesty. (London, 1893).
Nelson, P. The Coinage of William Wood, 1722-1733. (Brighton, 1903).
North, J. English Hammered Coinage Vol 1: Early Anglo-Saxon to Henry 111 c. A.D. 600-1272. (London, 1994).
North, J. English Hammered Coinage Vol 2: Edward 1 to Charles 11 1272-1662. (London, 1991).
North, J. & P. Preston-Morley. Brooker Collection, Coins of Charles I. SCBI 33. (London, 1984).
Peck, C. English Copper, Tin and Bronze Coins in the British Museum, 1558-1958. (London, 1964).
Spink. Coins of England & the United Kingdom, Standard Catalogue of British Coins. (London, 2012).
Spink. Coins of Scotland, Ireland and the Islands (Jersey, Guernsey, Man and Lundy) Pre-Decimal Issues, Standard Catalogue of British Coins. (Cambridge, 2003).
Wilson, A. & M. Rasmussen. English Pattern Trial and Proof Coins in Gold 1547-1968. (Cambridge, 2000).
Withers, P. & B. Small Change I - V Farthings and Halfpennies. (Llanfyllin, 2003 - 2005).
Withers, P. & B., & S. Ford. Anglo-Gallic Coins - Monnaies Anglo-Francaises. (Llanfyllin, 2015).
Woodhead, P. & D. Liddell. The Herbert Schneider Collection, Volume One, English Gold Coins and their Imitations, Henry III to Elizabeth I, 1257-1603. (London, 1996).
Woodhead, P. The Herbert Schneider Collection, Volume Two, English Gold Coins, 1603-20th Century. (London, 2002).
Woodhead, P. The Herbert Schneider Collection, Volume Three, Anglo-Gallic, Flemish and Brabantine Gold Coins, 1330 - 1794. (London, 2011).

Catalog current as of Friday, November 17, 2017.
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UK Coins