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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Thrace & Moesia| ▸ |Apollonia Pontica||View Options:  |  |  | 

Apollonia Pontica, Thrace

Apollonia Pontica was founded as Antheia by Greek colonists from Miletus in the 7th century B.C. They soon changed its name to Apollonia after building a temple for Apollo. The temple contained a colossal statue of Apollo by Calamis, which was later taken to Rome and placed in the Capitol. The anchor on the coinage is evidence of the importance of its maritime trade.

Four Rings, Celtic Ring Money, Black Sea Region, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Four| |Rings,| |Celtic| |Ring| |Money,| |Black| |Sea| |Region,| |c.| |800| |-| |100| |B.C.|, |Ring| |Money|
Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from as early as 800 B.C. and it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Bronze rings are, however, sometimes found in quite large hoards and, in Spain, they are sometimes found with silver bar and disk ingots, and with 2nd century B.C. denarii of the Roman Republic. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings but they were also undoubtedly used as a store of wealth and for trade.
LT87186. Bronze Ring Money, 4 rings, VF, nice patinas, some chipping on nubs of large ring, asymmetrical - varying thickness, not all knobs and nubs evenly spaced, (1x) Victoor -, Topalov Apollonia -, Burgos -, 4 knobs each ornamented with three nubs, 31.858g, 64mm, very large and extremely rare; (1x) Topalov Apollonia p. 93, XII.0, small cylindrical ring with three rings of knobs, 8.746g, 15mm diameter, 13mm long, scarce; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, 3 groups of 2 globules, 3.073g, 26mm; (1x) cf. Topalov Apollonia I p. 90, VIII.0 (all symmetrical), 4 globules unevenly spaced, 3.725g, 22mm; $160.00 SALE |PRICE| $144.00


Apollonia Pontika, Thrace, 480 - 450 B.C.

|Apollonia| |Pontica|, |Apollonia| |Pontika,| |Thrace,| |480| |-| |450| |B.C.|, |drachm|
A gorgoneion was a horror-creating apotropaic Gorgon head pendant. The name derives from the Greek word gorgůs, which means "dreadful." The Gorgons were three sisters who had hair of living, venomous snakes, and a horrifying face that turned those who saw it to stone. Stheno and Euryale were immortal, but their sister Medusa was not, and was slain by Perseus. Zeus, Athena, Hellenistic kings and Roman emperors wore Gorgoneion for protection. Images of the Gorgons were also put upon objects and buildings for protection. A Gorgon image is at the center of the pediment of the temple at Corfu, the oldest stone pediment in Greece from about 600 B.C.
GA95212. Silver drachm, Topalov Apollonia p. 586, 42; SNG BM 157; SNG Cop 452; HGC 3.2 1323; SNG Stancomb -, aVF, some marks and scratches, weight 3.294 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 180o, Apollonia Pontica (Sozopol, Bulgaria) mint, 480 - 450 B.C.; obverse anchor flukes up, curved stock, A left, crayfish right; reverse archaic Ionian style Gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa), snakes for hair, large open mouth, pointed teeth, long protruding tongue, reverse is concave; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Apollonia Pontika, Thrace, c. 450 - 425 B.C.

|Apollonia| |Pontica|, |Apollonia| |Pontika,| |Thrace,| |c.| |450| |-| |425| |B.C.|, |drachm|
A gorgoneion was a horror-creating apotropaic Gorgon head pendant. The name derives from the Greek word gorgůs, which means "dreadful." The Gorgons were three sisters who had hair of living, venomous snakes, and a horrifying face that turned those who saw it to stone. Stheno and Euryale were immortal, but their sister Medusa was not, and was slain by Perseus. Zeus, Athena, Hellenistic kings and Roman emperors wore Gorgoneion for protection. Images of the Gorgons were also put upon objects and buildings for protection. A Gorgon image is at the center of the pediment of the temple at Corfu, the oldest stone pediment in Greece from about 600 B.C.
GS91771. Silver drachm, Topalov Apollonia p. 588, 44; SNG BM 162; HGC 3.2 1324; SNG Stancomb -, gVF, well centered on a slightly irregularly shaped flan, attractive toning, some die wear, small edge splits, weight 3.349 g, maximum diameter 14.2 mm, die axis 300o, Apollonia Pontica (Sozopol, Bulgaria) mint, last late issues, c. 450 - 425 B.C.; obverse anchor flukes up, curved stock, crayfish left, A right; reverse full-face of a noble Gorgon's head with a low narrow forehead, projecting eyebrows and eyes, a short flat nose, abnormally open mouth, long teeth, protruding tongue, human hair mixed with thin snakes, slightly concave; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Apollonia Pontika, Thrace, c. 480 - 450 B.C.

|Apollonia| |Pontica|, |Apollonia| |Pontika,| |Thrace,| |c.| |480| |-| |450| |B.C.|, |drachm|
A gorgoneion was a horror-creating apotropaic Gorgon head pendant. The name derives from the Greek word gorgůs, which means "dreadful." The Gorgons were three sisters who had hair of living, venomous snakes, and a horrifying face that turned those who saw it to stone. Stheno and Euryale were immortal, but their sister Medusa was not, and was slain by Perseus. Zeus, Athena, Hellenistic kings and Roman emperors wore Gorgoneion for protection. Images of the Gorgons were also put upon objects and buildings for protection. A Gorgon image is at the center of the pediment of the temple at Corfu, the oldest stone pediment in Greece from about 600 B.C.
GS91768. Silver drachm, Topalov Apollonia p. 586, 42; SNG BM 157; SNG Cop 452; HGC 3.2 1323, VF, toned, flow lines, obverse die wear and cracks, reverse off center, weight 3.238 g, maximum diameter 14.2 mm, die axis 90o, Apollonia Pontica (Sozopol, Bulgaria) mint, c. 480 - 450 B.C.; obverse archaic Ionian style Gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa), snakes for hair, large open mouth, teeth, long protruding tongue; reverse anchor flukes up, curved stock, A left, crayfish right; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00


Apollonia Pontika, Thrace, c. 410 - 385 B.C.

|Apollonia| |Pontica|, |Apollonia| |Pontika,| |Thrace,| |c.| |410| |-| |385| |B.C.|, |reduced| |drachm|
Apollonia Pontica was founded as Antheia by Greek colonists from Miletus in the 7th century B.C. They soon changed its name to Apollonia after building a temple for Apollo. The temple contained a colossal statue of Apollo by Calamis, which was later taken to Rome and placed in the Capitol. The anchor on the coinage is evidence of the importance of its maritime trade.
GS91772. Silver reduced drachm, Topalov Apollonia p. 353, 7 and p. 590, 45; SNG BM 162; SNG Stancomb 38; HGC 3.2 1324; SNG Cop -, VF, porous, etched surfaces, obverse a little off center, weight 2.634 g, maximum diameter 13.4 mm, die axis 90o, Apollonia Pontica (Sozopol, Bulgaria) mint, c. 410 - 385 B.C.; obverse Attic style gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa), wide nose, wavy locks of human hair, tongue protruding to the side; reverse anchor flukes up, A left, crayfish right; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00


Apollonia Pontika, Thrace, c. 410 - 385 B.C.

|Apollonia| |Pontica|, |Apollonia| |Pontika,| |Thrace,| |c.| |410| |-| |385| |B.C.|, |reduced| |drachm|
Apollonia Pontica was founded as Antheia by Greek colonists from Miletus in the 7th century B.C. They soon changed its name to Apollonia after building a temple for Apollo. The temple contained a colossal statue of Apollo by Calamis, which was later taken to Rome and placed in the Capitol. The anchor on the coinage is evidence of the importance of its maritime trade.
GS91773. Silver reduced drachm, Topalov Apollonia p. 353, 7 and p. 590, 45; SNG BM 162; SNG Stancomb 38; HGC 3.2 1324; SNG Cop -, VF, light tone, flow lines, etched and porous surfaces, weight 2.716 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 90o, Apollonia Pontica (Sozopol, Bulgaria) mint, c. 410 - 385 B.C.; obverse Attic style gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa), wide nose, wavy locks of human hair, tongue protruding to the side; reverse anchor flukes up, A left, crayfish right; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00


Apollonia Pontika, Thrace, c. 410 - 385 B.C.

|Apollonia| |Pontica|, |Apollonia| |Pontika,| |Thrace,| |c.| |410| |-| |385| |B.C.|, |reduced| |drachm|
Apollonia Pontica was founded as Antheia by Greek colonists from Miletus in the 7th century B.C. They soon changed its name to Apollonia after building a temple for Apollo. The temple contained a colossal statue of Apollo by Calamis, which was later taken to Rome and placed in the Capitol. The anchor on the coinage is evidence of the importance of its maritime trade.
GS91777. Silver reduced drachm, Topalov Apollonia p. 353, 7 and p. 590, 45; SNG BM 162; SNG Stancomb 38; HGC 3.2 1324; SNG Cop -, VF, light toning, light deposits, mild die wear, scratch on reverse, weight 2.625 g, maximum diameter 13.9 mm, die axis 45o, Apollonia Pontica (Sozopol, Bulgaria) mint, c. 410 - 385 B.C.; obverse Attic style gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa), wide nose, wavy locks of human hair, tongue protruding to the side; reverse anchor flukes up, A left, crayfish right; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00


Apollonia Pontika, Thrace, 225 - 210 B.C.

|Apollonia| |Pontica|, |Apollonia| |Pontika,| |Thrace,| |225| |-| |210| |B.C.|, |AE| |18|
Apollo is one of the most important and complex of the Olympian deities in ancient Greek and Roman religion and Greek and Roman mythology. The ideal of the kouros (a beardless, athletic youth), Apollo has been variously recognized as a god of light and the sun, truth and prophecy, healing, plague, music, poetry, and more. Apollo is the son of Zeus and Leto, and has a twin sister, the chaste huntress Artemis.
GB91722. Bronze AE 18, Corpus Nummorum Thracorum 6332, SNG BM Black Sea 187, Topalov Apollonia II 102, HGC 3.2 1341 (S), SNG Stancomb -, F, green patina, bumps and marks, weight 4.866 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 0o, Apollonia Pontica (Sozopol, Bulgaria) mint, 225 - 210 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse anchor flukes up, IH left, crayfish right; scarce; $45.00 SALE |PRICE| $40.50







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REFERENCES|

Corpus Nummorum Thracorum - http://www.corpus-nummorum.eu/
Hoover, O. The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Vol. 3 - Handbook of Coins of Macedon and Its Neighbors. Part II: Thrace, Skythia, and Taurike, Sixth to First Centuries BC. (Lancaster, 2017).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Monnaies Grecques. (Amsterdam, 1883).
Naville Co. Monnaies grecques antiques S. Pozzi. Auction 1. (4 April 1921, Geneva).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IX, British Museum, Part 1: The Black Sea. (London, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XI, The William Stancomb Collection of Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Oxford, 2000).
Topalov, S. Apollonia Pontica, Contribution to the Study of the Coin Minting of the City 6th - 1st c. B.C. (Sofia, 2007).
Victoor, R. Roulles Celtes et Objets Assimilťs. (RosendaŽl-lez-Dunkerque, 1989).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Mysia. (London, 1892).

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