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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Macedonia| ▸ |Macedonian Kings||View Options:  |  |  |   

Macedonian Kings

Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II of Macedonia, 359 - 336 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |II| |of| |Macedonia,| |359| |-| |336| |B.C.|, |stater|
Philip II expanded the size and influence of the Macedonian Kingdom but is perhaps best known as the father of Alexander the Great. He personally selected the design of his coins.
SH96387. Gold stater, Le Rider pl. 62, 282A (D87/R216A); SNG ANS 144; SNG Cop 524; HGC 3 847, aEF, luster, attractive style, edge shaved in antiquity, weight 7.518 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 0o, Macedonia, Pella mint, c. 340 - 328 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse charioteer in fast biga right, kentron in right hand, reins in left hand, trident head right below horses forelegs, ΦIΛIΠΠOY exergue; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 70 (7 May 2020), lot 509; Morton & Eden Ltd. ; $5200.00 SALE |PRICE| $4680.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus II Gonatas, 277 - 239 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Antigonus| |II| |Gonatas,| |277| |-| |239| |B.C.|, |drachm|
Antigonus II Gonatas was a powerful ruler who solidified the position of the Antigonid dynasty in Macedon after a long period defined by anarchy and chaos and acquired fame for his victory over the Gauls who had invaded the Balkans. He was the grandson of Antigonus I Monophthalmus, who then controlled much of Asia. His maternal grandfather was Antipater. who controlled Macedonia and the rest of Greece and was recognized as regent of the empire, which in theory remained united.
SL89733. Silver drachm, Panagopoulou 152; AMNG III-2 p. 187, 5; SNG Cop 1203; SNG Mn 1079; SNG Alpha Bank 984; SNG Lockett 1526; SNG Berry 360; HGC 3.1 1044 (R3), NGC Ch VF, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (4629570-003), weight 3.59 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 0o, Pella mint, 272 - 239 B.C.; obverse wreathed head of Poseidon right; reverse Athena Alkidemos advancing left, brandishing thunderbolt in right hand, shield decorated with aegis on left arm, Macedonian helmet inner left, TI inner right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (Greek: king) downward on right, ANTIΓONOY downward on left; ex CNG Triton IX (10 Jan 2006), lot 829 (realized $600 plus fees); ex Robert Weimer Collection; NGC| Lookup; very rare; $485.00 SALE |PRICE| $436.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |III| |Arrhidaeus| |and| |Alexander| |IV,| |323| |-| |317| |B.C.|, |drachm|
Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother, under the regent Perdikkas. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regents held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias to ensure the succession of her grandson.
SH95391. Silver drachm, Price P48, Mller P137, gem EF, lustrous, flow lines, centered on a tight flan, weight 3.987 g, maximum diameter 16.34 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse Zeus Atophoros enthroned left, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, (ΠA monogram) left, ΦIΛIΠΠOY downward on right, B under throne; ex Forum (2006); $320.00 SALE |PRICE| $288.00 ON RESERVE


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander the Great

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Antigonos| |I| |Monophthalmos,| |323| |-| |301| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |and| |Types| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great|, |drachm|
Struck by Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") as strategos of Asia (320 - 306 B.C.) or as king (306 - 301 B.C.). Antigonos I was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
SL76591. Silver drachm, Price 1418, Mller Alexander, SNG Cop, SNG Munchen, SNG Alpha Bank, NGC Ch XF, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (2490386-003), weight 4.140 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 270o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Atophoros seated left, nude to waist, right leg drawn back, himation around waist and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, amphora in left field, Θ under throne; struck by Antigonus I Monophthalmus ("the One-eyed") as strategos of Asia (320 - 306 B.C.) or as king (306 - 301 B.C.); NGC| Lookup; $300.00 SALE |PRICE| $270.00 ON RESERVE


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Antigonus| |I| |Monophthalmus,| |323| |-| |301| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great|, |drachm|
Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (strategos of Asia, 320 - 306/5 B.C., king, 306/5 - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
SL21985. Silver drachm, Price 1406, Mller Alexander 821, SNG Cop 988, SNG Alpha Bank 586, SNG Munchen 458, SNG Saroglos 710, Ch VF, strike 4/5, surface 4/5 (flan flaw, 5768432-004), weight 4.117 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 180o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Atophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, lotus tipped long scepter vertical in left hand, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind, KI (control) left, ME monogram (control) under throne; ex FORVM (2009), NGC| Lookup; $280.00 SALE |PRICE| $252.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |III| |Arrhidaeus| |and| |Alexander| |IV,| |323| |-| |317| |B.C.|, |tetradrachm|Price| Reduced
Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother, under the regent Perdikkas. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regents held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias to ensure the succession of her grandson.
GS87632. Silver tetradrachm, Price P182, Mller Alexander P103, Demanhur 4601, SNG Munchen 969, SNG Cop 1077, SNG Saroglos -, VF, high relief, centered on a tight flan, rose toning, scratches and marks, some porosity, weight 16.902 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 270o, Mesopotamia, Babylon (Hillah, Iraq) mint, c. 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress, forelegs tied at neck; reverse Zeus seated left on throne, feet on footstool, right leg drawn back, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, ΦIΛIΠΠOY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) in exergue (off flan), M left, B under seat above strut; struck under Archon, Dokimos, or Seleukos I; $200.00 SALE |PRICE| $180.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip V or Perseus, 187 - 168 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |V| |or| |Perseus,| |187| |-| |168| |B.C.|, |AE| |21|
This coin was found in Southwestern Bulgaria (Serdi region) in 1997 alongside imitatives of the type struck by the Serdi Celts. The choice was appropriate for the Serdi Celts as the river Strymon runs through the Serdi region.
CE46744. Copper AE 21, SNG Cop 1299, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG Munchen,, VF, nice blue-green patina, weight 6.928 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 187 - 168 B.C.; obverse head of river-god, Strymon, right, with short horns and crown of reeds; reverse ornamented trident head, MAKE/∆ONΩN in two flanking upward lines, monograms below; ex Alex G. Malloy Serdi Celts Collection; scarce; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos II Gonatas, 277 - 239 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Antigonos| |II| |Gonatas,| |277| |-| |239| |B.C.|, |unit|
Antigonus was cunning, patient and persistent, preferring political rather than military solutions. In contrast to his father Demetrius and neighbor Pyrrhus, who aimed higher and fell lower, Antigonus achieved a measure of mediocre security. He cultivated the arts, gathering distinguished philosophers, poets, and historians, and he gained the affection of his subjects by his honesty.
GB93462. Bronze unit, SNG Alpha Bank 991 (same rev. die?), cf. SNG Cop 1216 ff. (various control monograms right), Weber 2196 (indistinct monogram), SGCV II 6787, VF, brown toned brassy flan, small closed crack, minor encrustation, weight 3.605 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 90o, Macedonian mint, 277 - 239 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse youth on prancing horse, crowning it, to right, B - A (BASILEWS ALEXANDROU) across upper field, KA monogram (control) right, monogram ANTI below; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III - Kassander, c. 323 - 310 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |III| |-| |Kassander,| |c.| |323| |-| |310| |B.C.|, |unit|
Herakles is most often depicted on coinage wearing the scalp of the Nemean lion over his head. The first of Herakles' twelve labors, set by his cousin King Eurystheus, was to slay the Nemean lion and bring back its skin. Herakles discovered arrows and his club were useless against it because its golden fur was impervious to mortal weapons. Its claws were sharper than swords and could cut through any armor. Herakles stunned the beast with his club and, using his immense strength, strangled it to death. During the fight, the lion bit off one of his fingers. After slaying the lion, he tried to skin it with a knife from his belt but failed. Wise Athena, noticing the hero's plight, told him to use one of the lion's own claws to skin the pelt.
GB91720. Bronze unit, Price 2800, SNG Cop 1113, SNG Munchen 919, SNG Saroglos 857, Mller Alexander -, gVF, dark patina, well centered, light deposits, porous, weight 5.800 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain western Anatolia mint, c. 323 - 310 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse from left to right: race torch, club, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward in center, bow in bowcase; $105.00 SALE |PRICE| $95.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III - Kassander, c. 323 - 310 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |III| |-| |Kassander,| |c.| |323| |-| |310| |B.C.|, |unit|
Herakles is most often depicted on coinage wearing the scalp of the Nemean lion over his head. The first of Herakles' twelve labors, set by his cousin King Eurystheus, was to slay the Nemean lion and bring back its skin. Herakles discovered arrows and his club were useless against it because its golden fur was impervious to mortal weapons. Its claws were sharper than swords and could cut through any armor. Herakles stunned the beast with his club and, using his immense strength, strangled it to death. During the fight, the lion bit off one of his fingers. After slaying the lion, he tried to skin it with a knife from his belt but failed. Wise Athena, noticing the hero's plight, told him to use one of the lion's own claws to skin the pelt.
GB92910. Bronze unit, Price 2800, SNG Cop 1113, SNG Munchen 919, SNG Saroglos 857, Mller Alexander -, VF, well centered, dark patina, encrustations, mild pitting, weight 5.594 g, maximum diameter 19.36 mm, die axis 90o, uncertain western Anatolia mint, c. 323 - 310 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck, uncertain round countermark; reverse from left to right: race torch, club, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward in center, bow in bowcase; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00




  



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REFERENCES|

Hersh, C. "Additions and Corrections to Martin J. Prices The Coinage in the name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus" in Studies Price.
Le Rider, G. Le monnayage d argent et d or de Philippe II frapp en Macdoine de 359 294. (Paris 1977).
Le Rider, G. Monnayage et finances de Philippe II. Un tat de la question. (Athens, 1996).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Mamroth, A. "Die Bronzemnzen des Knigs Philippos V. von Makedonien" in ZfN 42. (1935).
Mamroth, A. "Die Silbermnzen des Knigs Perseus" in ZfN 38. (1928).
Mamroth, A. "Die Silbermnzen des Knigs Philippos V. von Makedonien" in ZfN 40. (1930).
Mrkholm, O. Early Hellenistic Coinage. From the Accession of Alexander to the Peace of Apamea (336-188 BC). (Cambridge, 1991).
Newell. E.T. The Coinage of Demetrius Poliorcetes. (London, 1927).
Price, M. J. The Coinage in the name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. Vol. 1-2. (Zurich - London, 1991).
Sear, David. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 2, Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Austria, Klagenfurt, Landesmuseum fr Krnten, Sammlung Dreer. Part 3: Thracien-Macedonien-Ponien. (Klagenfurt, 1984).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Volume 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Mnchen Staatlische Mnzsammlung, Makedonien - Knige, 10/11 Heft. (Berlin, 2001).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain, Volume V, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, Part 3: Macedonia. (London, 1976).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece II. The Alpha Bank Collection, Macedonia I: Alexander I - Perseus. (Athens, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece, Volume IV, Numismatic Museum, Athens, The Petros Z. Saroglos Collection, Part 1: Macedonia. (Athens, 2005).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society, Part| 8: Macedonia 2 (Alexander I - Philip II). (New York, 1994).
Thompson, M. "The Mints of Lysimachus," in Essays Robinson.

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