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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Animals ▸ SheepView Options:  |  |  | 

Sheep on Ancient Coin

Phokaia, Ionia, c. 521 - 478 BC

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Phocaea, or Phokaia, was the northernmost Ionian city, on the boundary with Aeolis. The Phocaeans were the first Greeks to make long sea-voyages, developed a thriving seafaring economy, became a great naval power, and founded the colonies Massalia (Marseille, France), Emporion (Empúries, Spain) and Elea (Velia, Italy). They remained independent until all of mainland Ionia fell to Croesus of Lydia (c. 560-545 B.C.). In 546 B.C., Lydia was conquered by Cyrus the Great of Persia. After the Greeks defeated Xerxes I, Phocaea joined the Delian League, but later rebelled with the rest of Ionia. In 387 B.C., Phocaea returned to Persian control. After Alexander, it fell under Seleucid, then Attalid, and finally Roman rule.
SH87862. Electrum 1/24 stater, Bodenstedt 20; SNGvA 7939; BMC Ionia p. 207, 29A; Boston MFA 1897; Traité II 2093; Warren 1679, Choice aEF, weight 0.658 g, maximum diameter 7.4 mm, Phokaia (Foca, Turkey) mint, c. 521 - 478 B.C.; obverse ram's head left, seal swimming left below; reverse incuse quadripartite punch; $900.00 (€765.00)
 


Northern Syria, 3rd Century A.D.

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This type has long been attributed to Pharaoh Nektanebo II. Butcher, however, notes it is quite common in the vicinity of Antioch and in Northern Syria and the obverse style is similar to third century Antiochene zodiacal type coins. He suggests they may have been struck under Hadrian.
RY77448. Bronze AE 16, Butcher p. 405, 11; Weiser p. 16, 1 (Nektanebo II, Memphis, Egypt), aVF, scratches and marks, weight 3.396 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain (Antioch?) mint, 3rd century A.D.; obverse ram (Ares) leaping left, head turned back right; reverse balance scale (Libra); $160.00 (€136.00)
 


Kasolaba, Caria, c. 410 - 390 B.C.

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One of the letters on most example of this type or is only known in the Karian script but determining the mint city within Karia is less certain. The most current interpretation of the inscriptions and some recorded provenances support Kasolaba, a city which is mentioned in the Athenian Tribute Lists but whose precise location is uncertain.
GA87963. Silver hemiobol, Konuk Kasolaba 7, SNG Kayhan 996, SNG Keckman 873, SNG Tübingen 3316, Klein 497, Troxell 9A, VF, well centered, dark toning, compact slightly ragged flan, weight 0.283 g, maximum diameter 6.8 mm, die axis 180o, Kasolaba mint, c. 410 - 390 B.C; obverse head of ram right; reverse young male head right, Carian ethnic abbreviation: - A divided low across field, within incuse square; $150.00 (€127.50)
 


Kasolaba, Caria, c. 410 - 390 B.C.

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One of the letters on most example of this type or is only known in the Karian script but determining the mint city within Karia is less certain. The most current interpretation of the inscriptions and some recorded provenances support Kasolaba, a city which is mentioned in the Athenian Tribute Lists but whose precise location is uncertain.
GA87964. Silver hemiobol, Konuk Kasolaba 7, SNG Kayhan 996, SNG Keckman 873, SNG Tübingen 3316, Klein 497, Troxell 9A, VF/EF, interesting male head, lightly etched surfaces, tiny edge split, weight 0.510 g, maximum diameter 7.3 mm, die axis 180o, Kasolaba mint, c. 410 - 390 B.C; obverse head of ram right; reverse young male head right, curly hair, Carian ethnic abbreviation: - A divided low across field, within an incuse square; $140.00 (€119.00)
 


Kebren, Troas, 5th Century B.C.

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Kebren (or Cebren, or Cebrene) was in the middle Skamander valley in the Troad region of Anatolia. Its remains have been located in the forested foothills of Mount Ida (modern Kaz Dagi), approximately 7 km to the south of the Skamander. Archaeological remains suggest that in the mid-7th and early 6th century B.C. Kebren as a mixed Greco-Anatolian community. Writing in the early 4th century B.C., Xenophon implies that the population of Kebren was still both Greek and Anatolian. In the 5th century B.C., Kebren was a member of the Delian League and is listed in the Hellespontine district paying tribute to Athens. Following the defeat of Athens at the end of the Peloponnesian War in 404 B.C., Kebren came under the control of Zenis, the tyrant of Dardanus, and his wife Mania who together controlled the Troad on behalf of the Persian satrap Pharnabazos. Kebren was captured by the Spartan commander Dercylidas in 399 B.C., but soon after returned to Persian control. In 360 to 359, the Greek mercenary commander Charidemus briefly captured the city before being repelled by the Persian satrap Artabazos. At some point in the 4th century B.C. Kebren produced coinage depicting a satrap's head as the obverse type, indicating the city's close relationship with its Persian overlords. Kebren ceased to exist as an independent city about 310 B.C., when Antigonus I Monophthalmus founded Antigonia Troas (after 301 B.C. renamed Alexandria Troas) and included Kebren in the synoecism.
GA76288. Silver obol, Klein 312, SNG Kayhan 1051 - 1052 (Lykia?), SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Troas -, aEF, toned, grainy etched surfaces, weight 0.570 g, maximum diameter 7.3 mm, Kebren mint, 5th century B.C.; obverse head of ram left; reverse irregularly divided incuse square; rare; $115.00 (€97.75)
 


Pheneos, Arkadia, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 360 - 340 B.C.

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Feneos lies at the foot of Mount Cyllene, mythical birthplace of the god Hermes. It therefore was an important cult center for the god, notably during the annual festival of the Hermaea. Catullus (Poem 68) mentions the seasonal flooding of the plain and says it was drained by an underground channel dug by Hercules during his Twelve Labors. According to Herodotus the river Styx originates near Feneos. In the Aeneid, Evander's fond memories of a visit by Aeneas' father Anchises to Feneos are one factor in his decision to ally his Arcadian colonists to the Trojans.
GB86131. Bronze dichalkon, BCD Peloponnesos 1611; BMC Peloponnesus p. 193, 8; Traité III 893; SNG Cop -; Weber II -, F, dark green patina, well centered, bumps, marks, light corrosion, weight 4.465 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Pheneos (Feneos, Greece) mint, c. 370 - 340 B.C.; obverse head of young Hermes right, cloak tied tied around neck and petasos suspended by cord behind; reverse ΦENEΩ[N], ram standing right, ΣI below ram; ex CNG, ex BCD Collection with his handwritten tag noting, "Ex Peirese auction of 25 Nov 95, part of lot 2, the lot of 25 pcs. for FF 750 + 11%"; very rare; $70.00 (€59.50)
 


Pheneos, Arkadia, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 370 - 340 B.C.

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Traité III 894 says ΣI below and does not describe the AP in the exergue, but the plate appears to match our coin. The other referenced examples have only ΦE above the ram and nothing below on the reverse.

Feneos lies at the foot of Mount Cyllene, the mythical birthplace Hermes. It therefore was an important cult center for Hermes, notably during the annual festival of the Hermaea. Catullus (Poem 68) mentions the seasonal flooding of the plain, drained by an underground channel dug by Hercules during his Twelve Labors. According to Herodotus the river Styx originates near Feneos. In the Aeneid, Evander's fond memories of a visit by Aeneas' father Anchises to Feneos are one factor in his decision to ally his Arcadian colonists to the Trojans.
GB85898. Bronze chalkous, Traité III 894 corr. & pl. CCXXV, 3; cf. BCD Peloponnesos 1603; SNG Cop 272; BMC Peloponnesus p. 193, 7, pl. 36, 5; Weber II 4320, F, rough, weight 2.162 g, maximum diameter 14.0 mm, die axis 0o, Pheneos (Feneos, Greece) mint, c. 370 - 340 B.C.; obverse head of young Hermes right, cloak tied tied around neck and petasos suspended by cord behind; reverse ram standing right, ΦE above, IΣ below ram, AP in exergue; ex Pecunem auction 33 (5 Jul 2015), part of lot 767, ex CNG, ex BCD Collection with his round tag; very rare; $50.00 (€42.50)
 







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Catalog current as of Tuesday, December 18, 2018.
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