Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Anatolia ▸ Mysia ▸ PariumView Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Coins of Parion, Mysia

Founded in 709 B.C., the ancient city of Parion is now the village of Kemer in the township of Biga in Canakkale province of Turkey. In the Roman period, it was a major coastal city with two harbors used to connect Thrace with Anatolia. This was the main customs station through which all goods bound for Byzantium from Greece and the Aegean had to pass. It belonged to the Delian League. In the Hellenistic period, it came under the domain of Lysimachus, and subsequently the Attalid dynasty. In Roman times, it was a colonia, within the province of Asia. After that province was divided in the 4th century, it was in the province of Hellespontus.


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Parium, Mysia

Click for a larger photo
Located near Lampsacus, Parium belonged to the Delian League. In the Hellenistic period, it was in the domain of Lysimachus and then the Attalid dynasty. Julius Caesar refounded it as a colonia within the province of Asia. After Asia was divided in the 4th century, it was in the province of Hellespontus.
RP70938. Bronze AE 21, SNG Cop 304; SNGvA 1343; BMC Mysia p. 108, 116, VF, perfect centering, struck with a damaged obverse die, weight 4.774 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 180o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP VALERIANVS P F AVG, radiate,draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Capricorn swimming right, holding celestial globe between legs, cornucopia on back, C G I H P (Colonia Gemella Iulia Hadriana Pariana) below; ex Russian Coins; $300.00 (€267.00)
 


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Parium, Mysia

Click for a larger photo
Founded in 709 B.C., the ancient city of Parion was a major coastal city, near Lampsacus, with two harbors used to connect Thrace with Anatolia. Parium belonged to the Delian League. In the Hellenistic period, it came under the domain of Lysimachus, and subsequently the Attalid dynasty. Julius Caesar refounded it as a colonia in the province of Asia. It was the main customs station through which all goods bound for Byzantium from Greece and the Aegean had to pass. When this coin was minted, Parium was within the Conventus of Adramyteum. After Asia was divided in the 4th century, Parium was in the province of Hellespontus. Today it is the village of Kemer in the township of Biga, Canakkale province, Turkey.
RP84683. Bronze AE 24, RPC IV online 3152 (4 spec.); ANS Collection 1944.100.43132; BMC Mysia p. 105, 103 var. (no globe); SNG BnF -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Tub -, Choice F, well centered, attractive toned brassy surfaces, marks, small edge crack, centration dimples, weight 9.952 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, die axis 180o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, c. 178 - 180, probably 180; obverse IMP CAI Λ AV - COMODVS, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, with a short beard, from behind; reverse Capricorn swimming right, holding celestial globe between hooves, cornucopia on back, C G I H PAR (Colonia Gemella Iulia Hadriana Pariana) below; very rare; $170.00 (€151.30)
 


Parion, Mysia, 4th Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
A Gorgoneion was a horror-creating apotropaic Gorgon head pendant. The name derives from the Greek word gorgós, which means "dreadful." The Gorgons were three sisters who had hair of living, venomous snakes, and a horrifying face that turned those who saw it to stone. Stheno and Euryale were immortal, but their sister Medusa was not, and was slain by Perseus. Zeus, Athena, Hellenistic kings and Roman emperors wore Gorgoneion for protection. Images of the Gorgons were also put upon objects and buildings for protection. A Gorgon image is at the center of the pediment of the temple at Corfu, the oldest stone pediment in Greece from about 600 B.C.
GS79922. Silver hemidrachm, SNGvA 1319; SNG BnF 1357; SNG Delepierre 2530; BMC Mysia p. 95, 14 - 16; SNG Cop 257 ff. var. (various control symbols), VF, well centered on a tight flan, porous, weight 2.251 g, maximum diameter 13.8 mm, die axis 180o, Parion (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse bull standing left, looking right, ΠA/PI in two lines above and below bull, no control symbol; reverse Gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa), surrounded by snakes; $160.00 (€142.40)
 


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Parium, Mysia

Click for a larger photo
Eros was the Greek god of love. His Roman counterpart was Cupid ("desire"). According to Hesiod (c. 700 B.C.), one of the most ancient of all Greek sources, Eros was the fourth god to come into existence, coming after Chaos, Gaia (the Earth), and Tartarus (the Abyss or the Underworld). Parmenides (c. 400 B.C.), one of the pre-Socratic philosophers, makes Eros the first of all the gods to come into existence. In early Greek poetry and art, Eros was depicted as an adult male who embodies sexual power. But in later sources, Eros is represented as the son of Aphrodite, whose mischievous interventions in the affairs of gods and mortals cause bonds of love to form, often illicitly. Ultimately, by the later satirical poets, he is represented as a child, the precursor to the chubby Renaissance Cupid.
GB84659. Bronze AE 21, CNG e-auction 380, lot 417 (same dies); BMC Mysia -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG BnF -, SNG Tub -, SNG Hunterian -, SNG Çanakkale -, SNG Leypold -, F, well centered, small centration dimples, weight 6.202 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 45o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES L SEP SEV ALEXANDER (many letters blundered or retrograde), laureate and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse DEO CVPIDI-NI C G I H PAR (D and H blundered, god Cupid, Colonia Gemella Julia Hadriana Pariana), Cupid standing slightly left, head right, nude but for drapery over left arm, herm at feet on left; missing from the many references examined by Forum, but several examples are known from auctions; extremely rare; $160.00 (€142.40)
 


Parion, Mysia, c. 5th Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Imitative of this type were struck in large numbers by the Thracian Odrysian Kingdom. The original coins from Parion are much scarcer and also more attractive.
GA76155. Silver hemidrachm, SNG BnF 1343; Traité II 1, 652, pl. XVI, 22; SNGvA 1318; Rosen 525; Asyut 612, VF, high relief, bold strike, porous, slightly off center, weight 3.240 g, maximum diameter 12.4 mm, Parion mint, c. 5th century B.C.; obverse facing head of Medusa (gorgoneion) with open mouth and protruding tongue; reverse incuse square containing an irregular cruciform pattern, with pellet in center; $150.00 (€133.50)
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Parium, Mysia

Click for a larger photo
Founded in 709 B.C., the ancient city of Parion was a major coastal city, near Lampsacus, with two harbors used to connect Thrace with Anatolia. Parium belonged to the Delian League. In the Hellenistic period, it came under the domain of Lysimachus, and subsequently the Attalid dynasty. Julius Caesar refounded it as a colonia in the province of Asia. It was the main customs station through which all goods bound for Byzantium from Greece and the Aegean had to pass. When this coin was minted, Parium was within the Conventus of Adramyteum. After Asia was divided in the 4th century, Parium was in the province of Hellespontus. Today it is the village of Kemer in the township of Biga, Canakkale province, Turkey.
RP84686. Bronze AE 22, SNG BnF 1494, SNG Cop 296 var. (obv. legend), BMC Mysia -, SNGvA -, SNG Tübingen -, SNG Hunterian -, Lindgren -, VF, porous, centration dimples, weight 6.182 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, c. 178 - 180, probably 180; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AV, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, beardless, from behind; reverse Capricorn swimming right, holding celestial globe between hooves, cornucopia on back, C G I H P (Colonia Gemella Iulia Hadriana Pariana) below; $140.00 (€124.60)
 


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Uncertain (Philippi?), Macedonia

Click for a larger photo
Howgego notes the capricorn was a standard type for Parium. The capricorn was a symbol of Augustus and was probably adopted as a symbol of the city after a Augustan refoundation of the colonia. Howgego notes that the capricorn countermarks on the colonist plowing types may have indicated a devaluation of the coins.
RP85357. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 1656.43 (same countermark); SNG Cop 282; Varbanov 3770 (R4); McClean 7660 (Tiberius); SNG BnF 1439 (Parium, Mysia); c/m: Howgego 302 (Parium), gF, c/m: VF; scratches, corrosion, earthen deposits, reverse flattened by counter-marking, weight 3.861 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Uncertain (Philippi?) mint, 16 Jan 27 B.C. - 19 Aug 14 A.D.; obverse AVG, bare head right; c/m Capricorn right in rectangular punch; reverse two priests with yoke of two oxen right, plowing the pomerium (sacred boundary), founding the new colony; rare with countermark; $125.00 (€111.25)
 







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


REFERENCES

ANS Collections Database - http://numismatics.org/search/
Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - ).
Davesne, A. & G. Le Rider. Gülnar II. Le trésor de Meydancikkale. (Paris, 1989).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol. III. (London, 1926).
Klein, D. Sammlung von griechischen Kleinsilbermünzen und Bronzen. Nomismata 3. (Milano, 1999).
Grose, S. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Fitzwilliam Museum, Vol. III. (Cambridge, 1929).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
MacDonald, G. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the Hunterian Collection, University of Glasgow, Vol. II. (Glasgow, 1901).
Meadows, A. "Parion" in R. Ashton, et al., "Some Greek Coins in the British Museum" in NC 1998.
Mildenberg, L. & S. Hurter, eds. The Dewing Collection of Greek Coins. ACNAC 6. (New York, 1985).
Mionnet, T. Description de Médailles antiques grecques et romaines. (Paris, 1807-1837).
Price, M. & N. Waggoner. Archaic Greek Silver Coinage, The "Asyut" Hoard. (London, 1975).
RPC Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Seyrig, H. "Parion au 3e siècle avant notre ère" in Centennial Publication of the American Numismatic Society. (New York, 1958).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 4: Bosporus-Lesbos. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 19: Troas - Lesbos. (Berlin, 1991).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 4: Mysien-Ionien. (Berlin, 1989).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 1: Pontus, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Mysia, Troas, Aiolis, Lesbos, Ionia. (Berlin, 1957).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque Nationale, Cabinet des Médailles, Vol. 5: Mysia. (Paris, 2001).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque National, Collection Jean et Marie Delepierre. (Paris, 1983).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 6: Asia Minor: Pontus - Phrygia. (London, 1965).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain V, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. (London. 1951 - 2008).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain VI, Corpus Christi College Cambridge, The Lewis Collection. (Oxford, 1972 - 1992).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, Univ. of Glasgow. (Oxford, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece 2. The Alpha Bank Collection. Macedonia I: Alexander I - Perseus. (Athens, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 1: The Muharrem Kayhan Collection. (Istanbul, 2002).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 3: Canakkale Museum, Vol. 1, Roman Provincial Coins of Mysia, Troas, etc. (Istanbul, 2009).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, United States, Burton Y. Berry Collection, Part 2. Megaris to Egypt. (New York, 1962).
von Fritze, H. Die antiken Münzen Mysiens, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. IV. (Berlin, 1913).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Mysia. (London, 1892).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, July 25, 2017.
Page created in 1.186 seconds
Parion