Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Welcome to our shop. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! All blue text is linked. Click for a definition or other information. Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ SicilyView Options:  |  |  |    ▷▷

Ancient Greek Coins of Sicily

The coins of Ancient Greek Sicily are considered among the finest numismatic works of art ever produced. Superb examples may cost tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars. Forum's selections include some more affordable examples.


Syracuse, Sicily, Second Democracy, 466 - 405 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Following Heron's death, democracy was restored in 466 B.C. Similar to at Athens, the polis was governed by a council and popular assembly with an executive consisting of elected generals or strategoi. Syracuse fought against Athens 427 - 424 B.C. and again 415 - 413 B.C.; ultimately Syracuse was victorious. With further reforms by Diocles, the democratic nature of Syracuse's political structure was further strengthened.
SH70877. Silver tetradrachm, Boehringer 509 (V268/R362), SNG ANS 162 (same dies), VF, attractive Arethusa, obverse die worn, edge flaw, weight 16.852 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 270o, Syracuse mint, c. 460 - 450 B.C.; obverse charioteer driving slow quadriga right, reins in both hands, Nike flying right above crowning horses, ketos swimming right in exergue; reverse ΣYPAKOΣON, diademed head of Arethusa right, hair rolled and tucked under diadem, wearing earring and necklace, four dolphins swimming around clockwise; $1800.00 (€1566.00)


Himera, Sicily, 430 - 420 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The style of the early coinage of Himera varied greatly. This coin has the most cartoon-like style. Calciati describes the beveled flan as a "truncated cone."
SH68313. Bronze tetras, Calciati I p. 32, 18; SNG Cop 315; SNG ANS 181; SNG Morcom 596; HGC 2 467 (R1), VF, smoothing, weight 11.965 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 135o, Himera mint, 430 - 420 B.C.; obverse facing gorgoneion with cartoon-like style, protruding tongue, curly hair with no part, almond eyes, and pellet nostrils; reverse three pellets, within round incuse; rare; $580.00 (€504.60)


Syracuse, Sicily, Agathokles, 317 - 289 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
With an army of mercenaries, through deceit, and after banishing or murdering some 10,000 citizens, Agathocles made himself master of Syracuse and later most of Sicily. Machiavelli wrote of him, "It cannot be called prowess to kill fellow-citizens, to betray friends, to be treacherous, pitiless, and irreligious" and cited him as an example of "those who by their crimes come to be princes." According to the historian Justin, very early in life Agathocles parlayed his remarkable beauty into a career as a prostitute, first for men, and later, after puberty, for women, and then made a living by robbery before becoming a soldier and marrying a rich widow.
SH62327. Silver stater, Calciati II p. 611, 9; SNG ANS 554 - 557, VF, weight 8.206 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 270o, Syracuse mint, c. 317 - 305 B.C.; obverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with griffin, and necklace; reverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, Pegasos flying left, triskeles below; $440.00 (€382.80)


The Sileraioi, Sicily, c. 357 - 330 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Sileraioi was not a city. The Sileraians were Campanian mercenaries who took their name from their proximity to the river Silaros. These rare coins have been found at the site of their settlement, Cozzo Mususino, a natural strong-hold in north central Sicily. The coins are often overstruck on coins from Syracuse minted c. 375 - 345 B.C.
SH68704. Bronze Calciati p. 301, 2; HGC 2 1243 (R1); SNG Cop -; SNG ANS -; SNG München -; SNG Morcom -, VF/F, reverse rough, weight 7.521 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 90o, Sileraian mint, c. 340 - 330 B.C.; obverse ΣI−ΛEPAIΩ−N (retrograde counterclockwise from 3:00), man-faced bull forepart charging right; reverse SIL (retrograde, upward behind), warrior advancing right, spear in right hand, shield in left; rare; $400.00 (€348.00)


Gela, Sicily, c. 430 - 425 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Gela, named after the river Gela, was founded around 688 BC by colonists from Rhodos (Rhodes) and Crete, 45 years after the founding of Syracuse. In 424 B.C., the Congress of Gela established a platform of "Sicily for the Sicilians" and formed a league that pushed back the Athenian attempt to conquer the island.
SH67849. Silver litra, SNG Cop 275, BMC Sicily 52, Jenkins Gela 405, VF, weight 0.657 g, maximum diameter 13.1 mm, die axis 180o, Gela mint, 530 - 425 B.C.; obverse bearded horseman helmeted and armed with shield and spear prancing left; reverse CEΛAΣ, forepart of a man-faced bull right; $350.00 (€304.50)


Syracuse, Sicily, Timoleon, 3rd Democracy, 344 - 336 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Timoleon installed a democracy in 345 B.C. After the long series of internal struggles had weakened Syracuse's power, Timoleon tried to remedy this, defeating the Carthaginians near the Krimisos river in 339 B.C. Unfortunately the struggle among the city's parties restarted after his death and ended with the rise of another tyrant, Agathocles, who seized power in 317 B.C.
SH71353. Bronze dilitron, Calciati II p. 185, 80; SNG ANS 533 ff.; SNG Morcom 717; SNG München 1159; SNG Lloyd 1456; BMC Sicily p. 189, 311; HGC 2 1439 (S) (S), gVF, some corrosion, weight 18.018 g, maximum diameter 28.8 mm, die axis 225o, Syracuse mint, 344 - 336 B.C.; obverse ZEYΣ EΛEYΘEPIOΣ, laureate head of Zeus Eleutherios left; reverse ΣYPA−K−OΣIO−N (clockwise from 11:00), free horse prancing left; $350.00 (€304.50)


Soloi, Sicily, c. 300 - 254 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
SH57303. Bronze AE 15, Calciati I, p. 312, 16; SNG ANS 744, gVF, reverse die break, weight 1.334 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 270o, Soloi mint, c. 300 - 254 B.C.; obverse short-bearded male (Hercules?) head right, wearing hoop earring; reverse free horse galloping right; rare; $320.00 (€278.40)


Tauromenion, Sicily, c. 357 - 315 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Taormina is between Messina and Catania, 250 m above the sea, on the steep slopes of Mt. Tauro. A necropolis proves Tauromenion was first a Sikel stronghold. The Greek city was founded in 358 B.C. by descendants of the Naxians, whose city on the shore below had been destroyed by Dionysios of Syracuse in 403. Tauromenion flourished under Rome, especially after Augustus founded a colony in 30 B.C.
GB72201. Bronze AE 25, Calciati III p. 211, 4 (hemidrachm); De Luynes 1404; HGC 2 1577 (R1), F, corrosion, open edge crack, scratches, weight 14.651 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 270o, Tauromenion (Taormina, Sicily) mint, c. 357 - 315 B.C.; obverse APXAΓETAΣ, laureate head of Apollo Archagetas left; reverse TAYΠOM/ENITAN, man-faced bull walking left, bunch of grapes on left below head; from the Nicholas Molinari Collection; very rare; $300.00 (€261.00)


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D., Anchialus, Thrace

Click for a larger photo
When the Odrysian kingdom was abolished in 45 A.D., Anchialos (Pomorie, Bulgaria today) became part of the Roman province of Thrace. It was formally proclaimed a city under Trajan. Anchialos thrived in the 2nd and 3rd centuries serving as the most important import and export station of Thrace and acquired the appearance of a Roman city under the Severan Dynasty.
RP68711. Bronze 4 assaria, Varbanov 464 (R5), AMNG II 555, SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, Lindgren -, aVF, glossy green patina, weight 14.534 g, maximum diameter 30.7 mm, die axis 45o, Anchialus (Pomorie, Bulgaria) mint, 209 - 212 A.D.; obverse AY K Π CEΠ ΓETAC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse OYΛΠIANΩN AΓ−X−IAΛEΩN, Demeter standing left, reaching with right toward serpent coiled around large torch before her, small torch cradled in her left, two small pellets over ∆ in center field; rare; $270.00 (€234.90)


Himera, Sicily, 420 - 409 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In 409 B.C., Carthage attacked Himera. The city was unprepared; its fortifications weak. At first they were supported about 4000 auxiliaries from Syracuse, but their general, Diocles, seized with panic for the safety of Syracuse itself, abandoned Himera. The city was utterly destroyed, its buildings, even its temples, were razed to the ground. More than 3000 prisoners were put to death by General Hannibal Mago as a human sacrifice to the memory of his grandfather General Hamilcar who had been defeated at the Battle of Himera in 480 B.C.
GB70582. Bronze hemilitron, Calciati I p. 41, 27; SNG Cop 318, SNG München 365; SNG ANS 184 var (grasshopper control), VF, well centered, nice patina, weight 5.272 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 90o, Himera mint, 420 - 409 B.C.; obverse Pan on a goat prancing right, nude but for chlamys fluttering in the wind behind, preparing to blow on conch in right, thyrsus in left over shoulder, Corinthian helmet (control symbol) below; reverse HIMEPAION, Nike flying left, apluster with dangling fillets in extended right, fold of long chiton in left, six pellets (mark of value) left below arm; $260.00 (€226.20)




   ▷▷






REFERENCES

Arnold-Biucchi, C. "La monetazione d'argento di Himera classica. I tetradrammi" in Quaderni Ticinesi XVII (1988).
Bahrfeldt, M.F. von. Die römisch-sicilischen Münzen aus der Zeit der Republik, etc. (Geneva, 1904).
Bloesch, H. Griechische Münzen In Winterthur, Vol. 1. Spain, Gaul, Italy, Sicily, Moesia, Dacia, Sarmatia, Thrace, and Macedonia. (Winterthur, 1987).
Boehringer, C. "Die Münzgeschichte von Leontini in klassischer Zeit" in Studies Price.
Boehringer, C. "Himera im IV. Jahrhundert v. Chr." in Kraay-Mørkholm Essays.
Boehringer, E. Die Münzen von Syrakus. (Berlin and Leipzig, 1929).
Buttrey, T.V., et al. "Catalogue of Coins Found during the Years 1955-1981" in Morgantina Studies II: The Coins. (Princeton, 1989).
Calciati, R. Corpus Nummorum Siculorum. The Bronze Coinage, Vol. I - III. (Milan, 1983 - 1987).
Castelli, G.L. Siciliae nummi veteres. (Palermo, 1781).
Evans, A.J. "Contributions to Sicilian Numismatics" in Numismatic Chronicle XVI, 1896., pp. 101 - 143.
Evans, A.J. Syracusan Medallions and their Engravers. (London, 1892).
Gabrici, E. La monetazione del bronzo nella Sicila antica. (Palermo, 1927).
Gardner, P. The Types of Greek Coins. (Cambridge, 1882).
Gutman. F & W. Schwabacher. "Tetradrachmen und Didrachmen von Himera (472-409 v Chr)" in MBNG 47. (1929).
Head, B.V. History of the Coinage of Syracuse. (London, 1874).
Hill, G.F. Coins of Ancient Sicily. (Westminster, 1905).
Holm, A. Geschichte des sicilischen Münzwesens (in vol. iii. of his Geschichte Alterthum, 1870-1902).
Jenkins, G.K. Coins of Punic Sicily. (Zürich, 1997).
Jenkins, G.K. & R.B. Lewis. Carthaginian Gold and Electrum Coins. Royal Numismatic Society Special Publication 2. (London, 1963).
Jenkins, G.K. The Coinage of Gela. AMUGS II. (Berlin, 1970).
Kraay, C.M. The Archaic Coinage of Himera. (Naples, 1984).
Landolina, F. & L. Paternò, Ricerche numm. sull? antica Sicilia. (Palermo, 1872).
Lindgren, H. C. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints from the Lindgren Collection. (1989).
Poole, R.S. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Sicily. (London, 1876).
Reinach, T. Sur la valeur relative des métaux monétaires dans la Sicile greque (L'Histoire par les monnaies). (Paris, 1902).
Salinas, A. Le monete delle antiche città di Sicilia. (Palermo, 1871).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Seltman, C.T. "The Engravers of the Akragantine Decadrachms" in NC 1948.
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Volume 1: Italy - Sicily. (West Milford, NJ, 1981).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Parts 5 - 6. (Berlin, 1977).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain, Volume X, John Morcom Collection. (Oxford, 1995).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, USA, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society, Parts 3 - 5. (New York, 1975).
Tudeer, L.O. Die Tetradrachmenprägung von Syrakus in der Periode der Signierenden Künstler. (Berlin, 1913).
Tropea, G. Numismatica Siceliota del Museo, Mandralisca in Cefalù. (Messina, 1901).
Viola, M.R. Corpus Nummorum Punicorum. (Milan, 2010).
Weil, R. Die Künstlerinschriften der sicilischen Münzen. (Winckelmannsfest-Progr. 44), 1884.
Westermark, U. "Himera. The Coins of Akragantine Type 2" in Travaux Le Rider.
Westermark, U. & K. Jenkins. The Coinage of Kamarina. Royal Numismatic Society, Special Publication 9. (London, 1980).


Catalog current as of Tuesday, July 07, 2015.
Page created in 6.63 seconds
Sicilian Greek Coins