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Gold Coins

Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 550 - 450 B.C.

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Kyzikos, purportedly the first Milesian colony, was located on the southwest shore of the Propontis in ancient Mysia next to the river Aisepos. Its prosperity was due principally to its two fine harbors, which made the city a convenient stopping point for merchant ships trading between the Aegean and Black Seas. Its principal export was the tunny, of which its waters had abundant stock. The prevalence of winged beings in Kyzikene coinage is a reflection of archaic mythological convention that assigned wings to most divine or sacred entities as an immediately visible and understandable symbol of their nature, and in the case of gods, of their power to move at will across great distances. In the case of the winged animals, we should probably understand these to be attributes of or animals sacred to a particular Olympian god.
SH86217. Electrum stater, Von Fritze I (Nomisma VII) 104 & pl. 3, 23; Boston MFA 1433; SNG BnF 245; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; BMC Mysia -, VF, tight flan, edge cracks, weight 16.091 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Kyzikos mint, c. 550 - 450 B.C.; obverse winged dog seated left, head turned back right, curved archaic wing, wearing collar, tunny fish below to left; reverse quadripartite incuse square; extremely rare; $6500.00 (€5525.00)
 


Ionia, c. 650 - 600 B.C., Striated Type

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Mankind's first coin type with an obverse and reverse! Rare and important. The earliest dated coin hoard was deposited in the foundation of the Artemision, the temple of Artemis at Ephesos, as an offering during construction, c. 600 B.C. These earliest coins, which included this type, were struck from electrum, a natural alloy of gold and silver found as nuggets in the rivers and streams of Lydia and Ionia. This striated type is the first type to have an obverse design in addition to the reverse punch. Because of its simple obverse design, it is described by some authorities as the first true coin.
SH87928. Electrum hekte, 1/6 stater, Milesian standard; Weidauer 6, Traité I 12, SNGvA 1769, SNG Kayhan 680, Karwiese Artemision I.6, SNG Fitzwilliam -, Rosen -, Zhuyuetang -, VF, light marks, earthen deposits, weight 2.293 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, Ionia, uncertain mint, c. 650 - 600 B.C.; obverse flattened striated surface; reverse two rough approximately square incuse punches; rare and important; $6000.00 (€5100.00)
 


Western Anatolia, c. 620 - 600 B.C., Plain Globular Type

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Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

Unpublished! The majority of the earliest electrum issues were struck on the lighter Milesian weight standard, with hectes weighing approximately 2.35 grams. This example, however is on the heavier Phocaic standard that was used at mints such as Cyzicus, Mysia and Phocaea, Ionia.
SH85577. Electrum hekte, Phokaic standard 1/6 stater; unpublished, EF, flan cracks, weight 2.721 g, maximum diameter 8.96 mm, uncertain western Anatolia mint, c. 620 - 600 B.C.; obverse plain globular surface; reverse one small incuse square punch; extremely rare; $2850.00 (€2422.50)
 


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Darios I to Xerxes II, c. 485 - 420 B.C.

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This type was minted in Lydia, Anatolia, while under Persian control, prior to Alexander the Great's conquest. The Persian or Achaemenid Empire (c. 550 - 330 B.C.) was the largest empire in ancient history extending across Asia, Africa and Europe, including Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of Central Asia, Asia Minor, Thrace and Macedonia, much of the Black Sea coastal regions, Iraq, northern Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Palestine and Israel, Lebanon, Syria, and much of ancient Egypt as far west as Libya.Persian Empire

SH87857. Gold daric, Carradice Type IIIb, Group A/B (pl. XIII, 27); Meadows, Administration 321; BMC Arabia pl. XXIV, 26; Sunrise 24; Lydo-Milesian standard, gVF, underlying luster, weight 8.309 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 485 - 420 B.C.; obverse kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, bearded, crowned, wearing kidaris and kandys, quiver on shoulder, transverse spear downward in right hand, bow in extended left hand; reverse oblong irregular rectangular incuse punch; ex CNG auction 109, lot 368; $2500.00 (€2125.00)
 


Phokaia, Ionia, c. 521 - 478 BC

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Phocaea, or Phokaia, was the northernmost Ionian city, on the boundary with Aeolis. The Phocaeans were the first Greeks to make long sea-voyages, developed a thriving seafaring economy, became a great naval power, and founded the colonies Massalia (Marseille, France), Emporion (Empúries, Spain) and Elea (Velia, Italy). They remained independent until all of mainland Ionia fell to Croesus of Lydia (c. 560-545 B.C.). In 546 B.C., Lydia was conquered by Cyrus the Great of Persia. After the Greeks defeated Xerxes I, Phocaea joined the Delian League, but later rebelled with the rest of Ionia. In 387 B.C., Phocaea returned to Persian control. After Alexander, it fell under Seleucid, then Attalid, and finally Roman rule.
SH87862. Electrum 1/24 stater, Bodenstedt 20; SNGvA 7939; BMC Ionia p. 207, 29A; Boston MFA 1897; Traité II 2093; Warren 1679, Choice aEF, weight 0.658 g, maximum diameter 7.4 mm, Phokaia (Foca, Turkey) mint, c. 521 - 478 B.C.; obverse ram's head left, seal swimming left below; reverse incuse quadripartite punch; $900.00 (€765.00)
 


Byzantine Empire, Tiberius III Apsimar, Late 698 - Summer 705

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After the loss of Carthage to the Arabs in 698 the disgruntled Byzantine forces declared Apsimar emperor and laid siege to Constantinople. The emperor Leontius, who had only recently taken the throne from Justinian II, was easily defeated and Aspimar took the throne with the name Tiberius. Tiberius mutilated Leontius' nose and imprisoned him, just as Leontius had done to Justinian II. In 705, Justinian II returned to Constantinople with an army of Bulgars and Slavs. He gained entrance to the city by climbing through an aqueduct pipe and with the advantage of surprise regained his throne. Both Leontius and Tiberius were dragged through the streets in chains and beheaded.
SH87501. Gold solidus, DOC II-2 1b, Morrisson BnF 17/Cp/AV/01, Wroth BMC p. 346, 2, Tolstoi 2, Hahn MIB 1, Sommer 16.1, SBCV 1360, Berk 193, Ratto -, gVF+, severe double strike, weight 4.405 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, late 698 - summer 705; obverse D TIbERIVS PE AV, Crowned and cuirassed bust facing with short beard, holding spear diagonally across his body and a shield, shield decorated with rider; reverse VICTORIA AVSY B (victory of the Emperor, 2nd officina), Cross potent on four steps, CONOB in exergue; ex Harlan J. Berk; $700.00 (€595.00)
 


Ionia, c. 650 - 600 B.C., Plain Globular Type

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Mankind's first coin type! Rare and important. This is an example of the very earliest form of coinage; a type-less (blank) electrum globule, weighed to a specific standard, with a simple square punch mark on one side (two or three punch marks on larger denominations). Nine similar electrum pieces were within the famous "Artemision Find" at Ephesus in 1904.
SH87925. Electrum 1/24 stater, SNG Kayhan 678, Weidauer -, Rosen -, SNGvA -, SNG Cop -, VF, bumps and scratches, weight 0.526 g, maximum diameter 6.0 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, c. 650 - 600 B.C.; obverse plain globular surface; reverse incuse punch: roughly square pyramid with striated sides; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 47 (9 Oct 2016), lot 160; rare; $700.00 (€595.00)
 


Ionia, c. 650 - 600 B.C., Plain Globular Type

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Mankind's first coin type! Rare and important. This is an example of the very earliest form of coinage; a type-less (blank) electrum globule, weighed to a specific standard, with a simple square punch mark on one side (two or three punch marks on larger denominations).
SH87926. Electrum hemihekte, 1/12 stater; SNG Kayhan 676, SNGvA 7763, Rosen 324, Traité -, Weidauer -, VF, scratches, weight 1.186 g, maximum diameter 7.2 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, period of the Artemision Find, c. 650 - 600 B.C.; obverse plain globular surface; reverse incuse square punch; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 47, lot 271; very rare; $700.00 (€595.00)
 


Ionia, c. 600 - 550 B.C.

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CNG identified their example of the type, from the same dies, as unpublished and unique. This is only the third hemihekte of this type known to Forum (the CNG coin and two we have handled). Similar coins in different denominations are also know from auction listings, some of which fail to notice the two "eyes."
SH87923. Electrum hemihekte, 1/12 stater Samian-Euboeic standard; cf. CNG mail bid sale 72 (14 Jun 2006), lot 774 (same dies); Elektron I -; Weidauer -; Traité I -; SNG Kayhan -, VF, bumps and scratches, tiny edge cracks,, weight 1.087 g, maximum diameter 8.2 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, c. 600 - 550 B.C.; obverse plain with two pellets side-by-side on the edge (crude scarab beetle?); reverse irregular square incuse pattern; extremely rare; $650.00 (€552.50)
 


Ionia, c. 650 - 600 B.C., Plain Globular Type

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Mankind's first coin type! Rare and important. This is an example of the very earliest form of coinage; a type-less (blank) electrum globule, weighed to a specific standard, with a simple square punch mark on one side (two or three punch marks on larger denominations). Nine similar blank electrum pieces were within the famous "Artemision Find" at Ephesus in 1904.
SH87924. Electrum 1/48 stater, Milesian standard; SNGvA 7764, Weidauer -, Traité I -, Rosen -, SNG Kayhan -, Mitchiner ATEC -, VF, weight 0.285 g, maximum diameter 4.2 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, c. 650 - 600 B.C.; obverse plain globular surface; reverse incuse irregular square punch; very rare; $550.00 (€467.50)
 




  



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Catalog current as of Thursday, December 13, 2018.
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Gold Coins