Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Animals ▸ LionView Options:  |  |  |   

Lions on Ancient Coins

Lydian Kingdom, Kroisos, c. 561 - 546 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In Greek and Persian cultures the name of Croesus became a synonym for a wealthy man. Croesus' wealth remained proverbial beyond classical antiquity: in English, expressions such as "rich as Croesus" or "richer than Croesus" are used to indicate great wealth to this day. According to Herodotus, Croesus encountered the Greek sage Solon and, secure in his own wealth and happiness, asked Solon who was the happiest man in the world. He was disappointed by Solon's response that three had been happier than Croesus: Tellus, who died fighting for his country, and the brothers Kleobis and Biton who died peacefully in their sleep after their mother prayed for their perfect happiness because they had pulled her to a festival in an oxcart. Solon explained that Croesus cannot be the happiest man because the fickleness of fortune means that the happiness of a man's life cannot be judged until after his death. Sure enough, Croesus' hubristic happiness was reversed by the tragic death of his accidentally-killed son, his wife's suicide at the fall of Sardis, and his defeat at the hands of the Persians.
SH85153. Silver stater, SNG Kayhan 1018; SNG Cop 455; SNGvA 2873; BMC Lydia p. 7, 37; Traité II/1 407, pl. X, 7; Sunrise 10; Rosen 662; SGCV II 3419, aEF, well centered and struck, etched surfaces, weight 10.047 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 560 - 546 B.C.; obverse on the left, forepart of a roaring lion right, confronting, on the right, the forepart of a bull left, pellet above lion's head; reverse two incuse square punches, of unequal size, side by side; ex Art of Money (Portland, OR); $3000.00 (€2670.00)
 


Ionia, c. 600 - 550 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
From die wear, we know that many of these early electrum types from Ionia were struck in very large quantities. From the rarity of survivors, we know the vast majority of these earliest coins were melted down and recycled into later coins.
SH84466. Electrum 1/24 stater, Weidauer 122 - 123; SNG Kayhan 708 - 710, Mitchiner ATEC 142, Zhuyuetang -, Traité I -, Rosen -, SNGvA -, VF, dies quite worn, edge splits, weight 0.590 g, maximum diameter 7.1 mm, Ionia, uncertain mint, c. 600 - 550 B.C.; obverse head of lion right, linear form; reverse quadripartite incuse square punch, pellet in center; $400.00 (€356.00)
 


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Although the primary references do not specify the arrangement of the reverse inscription, most specimens of this issue have the have the royal title on the right and Lysimachos' name in the exergue. This variant with the title in the exergue and his name right is very rare and was first described in the referenced article by Nicholas A. Sicurella, published in The Celator in June 1996.
GS84487. Silver drachm, Sicurella, N. "An unpublished drachm of Lysimachus" in The Celator 10.6 (June 1996), figs. 1-2; Price L12; Thompson 36; Müller 25; SNG BnF -, gVF, lightly toned, minor marks, small flaw on edge, some minor edge flaking, weight 4.141 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 135o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 299 - 296 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse ΛYΣIMAXOY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, dolphin left above lion forepart left (control symbols) on left, torch (control symbol) below throne; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection, ex CNG e-auction 296 (13 Feb 2013), lot 25; $380.00 (€338.20)
 


Syracuse, Sicily, Agathokles, 317 - 289 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
With an army of mercenaries, through deceit, and after banishing or murdering some 10,000 citizens, Agathocles made himself master of Syracuse and later most of Sicily. Machiavelli wrote of him, "It cannot be called prowess to kill fellow-citizens, to betray friends, to be treacherous, pitiless, and irreligious" and cited him as an example of "those who by their crimes come to be princes." According to the historian Justin, very early in life Agathocles parlayed his remarkable beauty into a career as a prostitute, first for men, and later, after puberty, for women, and then made a living by robbery before becoming a soldier and marrying a rich widow.
GI76945. Bronze litra, Calciati II p. 287, 150 Ds 14 Rs 63; BMC Sicily p. 196, 391; SNG ANS 740; SNG Cop 767; HGC 2 1465 var. (R1, 4th Democracy, different controls), aEF, dark sea-green patina, light marks, small spots of light corrosion, flan with ragged edge splits, weight 8.501 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 315o, Syracuse mint, 305 - 295 B.C.; obverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, head of young Herakles left, wearing taenia, star (control symbol) behind neck; reverse lion walking right, right foreleg raised, club right above, arrow right (control symbol) in exergue; $300.00 (€267.00)
 


Elaios, Thracian Chersonesos, c. 350 - 281 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The city of Elaios in Thracian Chersonesos occupied a strategic position on what is now called the Gallipoli peninsula. In the ancient world, it was know for its sanctuary of the Trojan hero Protesilaos. Philostratos, writing of this sanctuary in the early third century A.D., speaks of a temple statue of Protesilaos standing on a base which was shaped like the prow of a boat. Of all the references listed in this coin's attribution, SNG Copenhagen is the only to list any coins of this rare city.
GB85370. Bronze AE 13, SNG Cop 898 (also same countermark); BMC Thrace -, Corpus Nummorum Thracorum -, SNG Tub -, SNG BM -, SNG Stancomb -, SNG Pushkin -, VF, well centered, highlighting earthen deposits, some marks, some corrosion, reverse slightly flattened by counter marking, weight 2.392 g, maximum diameter 13.3 mm, die axis 0o, Elaios mint, c. 350 - 281 B.C.; obverse veiled female head (Demeter?) right (wreathed in grain?); countermark: lion forepart right in an round punch; reverse bee upward, seen from above, EΛAIOY/ΣIΩN flanking in two upward lines first on left, ΠA monogram below; extremely rare; $250.00 (€222.50)
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This type indicates Severus granted a special favor to Carthage. The water may indicate that he improved the water supply, possibly construction of an aqueduct.
RS79924. Silver denarius, RIC IV 130a; RSC III 97; BMCRE V p. 208, 280; Hunter III 38; SRCV II 6806, Choice VF, nice youth portrait, excellent centering, edge cracks, weight 3.228 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 201 - 206 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse INDVLGENTIA AVGG IN CARTH, Dea Caelestis riding lion right over water gushing from rock, thunderbolt in right hand, scepter in left hand; $225.00 (€200.25)
 


Rhegion, Bruttium, Italy, c. 415 - 387 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Rhegion reached great artistic and cultural heights. It was home to academies, such as the Pythagorean School, and to well-known poets, historians and sculptors such Ibycus, Ippy, and Pythagoras. It was an important ally of the Roman Republic. Rhegium flourished during the Imperial Age but was devastated by several major earthquakes and tsunami. St. Paul passed through Rhegium on his final voyage to Rome (Acts XXVIII:13).
GS79976. Silver litra, SNG Cop 1936; SNG ANS 670; SNG Munchen 1588; SNG Tub 536; HN Italy 2495; BMC Italy p. 376, 30, VF, well centered, nice style, uneven toning, light corrosion, weight 0.722 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, die axis 90o, Rhegion mint, c. 415 - 387 B.C.; obverse facing lion scalp mask; reverse olive sprig with two olives, PH between the leaves; $180.00 (€160.20)
 


Akanthos, Macedonia, c. 525 - 470 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Akanthos was on the Athos peninsula of Chalcidice, near modern Ierissos. The name Akanthos (derived from the acanthus bush) may refer to the thorny nature of the town's foundation. According to Thucydides, in the 7th century B.C., colonists from Andros and Chalcis arrived on the shore near Acanthus at the same time. The frightened natives fled. When the colonists realized the town was empty, each group sent a runner to take the town first. The Chalcidian was the fastest but the Andrian, seeing he was losing, stopped and threw his spear in the city's gate before his opponent arrived. A court case followed, which was won by the Andrians because they had "taken over" the city first.
GA85066. Silver tetrobol, SNG Cop 7; SNG ANS 18; SNG Berry 4; Weber II 1875, BMC Macedonia p. 33, 10; AMNG III/2 13; Rosen 84, VF, well centered, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.317 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, Akanthos (Ierissos, Greece) mint, c. 525 - 470 B.C.; obverse forepart of lion right, head turned so the top of the head is seen, floral ornament (acanthus?) above, dotted line at truncation, dotted ground line; reverse quadripartite incuse square; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 245, part of lot 1906; $180.00 (€160.20)
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Severus was born in Leptis Magna (Khoms, Libya) in the Roman province of Africa. This type was struck to commemorate the emperor's visit to his native Africa in 207. See Leptis Magna on Wikipedia.
RS79618. Silver denarius, RIC IV 207 (S); RSC III 493; BMCRE V p. 263, 531; SRCV II 6341, aEF, slightly off-center, weight 3.395 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, Rome mint, 207 A.D.; obverse SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P XV COS III P P, Africa standing half right, wearing elephant skin headdress, with right holding out drapery with fruits in the fold, lion at her feet right; scarce; $160.00 (€142.40)
 


Persian Empire, Sidon, Phoenicia, Ba'Alshillem II, c. 401 - 366 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Sidon, named for the "first-born" of Canaan, the grandson of Noah (Genesis 10:15, 19), is frequently referred to by the prophets (Isaiah 23:2, 4, 12; Jeremiah 25:22; 27:3; 47:4; Ezekiel 27:8; 28:21, 22; 32:30; Joel 3:4). The Sidonians long oppressed Israel (Judges 10:12) but Solomon entered into a matrimonial alliance with them, and thus their form of idolatrous worship found a place in the land of Israel (1 Kings 11:1, 33). Jesus visited the "coasts" of Tyre and Sidon (Matthew 15:21; Mark 7:24) where many came to hear him preach (Mark 3:8; Luke 6:17). After leaving Caesarea, Paul's ship put in at Sidon, before finally sailing for Rome (Acts 27:3, 4).
GS70326. Silver 1/16 shekel, Elayi 2004 851 ff.; HGC 10 240; Betlyon 27 (Abd'astart, Straton I); BMC Phoenicia p 146, 36 (same); SNG Cop 197 ff. (same), VF, toned, tiny edge cuts, banker's mark, tight flan, bumps and marks, weight 0.648 g, maximum diameter 9.5 mm, die axis 90o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, c. 371 - 370 B.C.; obverse war galley left, Phoenician letter beth above, banker's mark or countermark above galley; reverse King of Persia (to left) standing right, slaying erect lion to right, Phoenician letter ayin between them; $160.00 (€142.40)
 




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Friday, June 23, 2017.
Page created in 1.622 seconds
Lions