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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Severan Period| ▸ |Macrinus||View Options:  |  |  | 

Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D.

Macrinus was the Praetorian prefect during the reign of the murderous Caracalla. Macrinus arranged Caracalla's assassination and he and his son Diadumenian seized power and were accepted by the senate. Macrinus concluded an unfavorable peace with the Persians. This disgrace, magnified by propaganda of Julia Maesa, Caracalla's aunt, inspired the Syrian legions to revolt. In the ensuing conflict Macrinus was defeated. He fled, only to be betrayed and executed.

|Macrinus|, |Macrinus,| |11| |April| |217| |-| |8| |June| |218| |A.D.|, |sestertius|
Macrinus was Praetorian Prefect for Caracalla but arranged Caracalla's assassination and seized power. He and his son were accepted by the senate. The Syrian legions, inspired by Julia Maesa, Caracalla's aunt, revolted after he concluded an unfavorable peace with the Persians. He was defeated and executed.
SL92493. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 121 (S), BMCRE V 113, Cohen IV 79, SRCV II 7391, Hunter III -, NGC F, strike 4/5, surface 1/5, scratches (577028-007), weight 19.150 g, maximum diameter 30.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 11 Apr 217 - 31 Dec 217 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse PONTIF MAX TR P P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power, father of the country), Felicitas standing facing, head left, long caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, drapery over left arm, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field below center; from the Errett Bishop Collection; NGC| Lookup; $330.00 SALE |PRICE| $297.00
 


|Macrinus|, |Macrinus,| |11| |April| |217| |-| |8| |June| |218| |A.D.|, |denarius|NEW
This coin was dedicated to Jupiter the protector. Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. Emperors frequently made vows to Jupiter for protection. The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored emperors and kings, those in positions of authority similar to his own.
RS92492. Silver denarius, RSC III 33a, RIC IV 73, BMCRE V 68, Hunter III 28, SRCV II 7338 var. (bust), Choice gVF, well centered, superb portrait, old collection toning, flow lines, small edge cracks, weight 2.903 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 217 - 218 A.D.; obverse IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right, from front; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing facing, head left, nude, thunderbolt in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $270.00 SALE |PRICE| $243.00 ON RESERVE


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Anazarbus, Cilicia

|Cilicia|, |Macrinus,| |11| |April| |217| |-| |8| |June| |218| |A.D.,| |Anazarbus,| |Cilicia|, |AE| |35|
Anazarbus was founded by Assyrians. Under the early Roman Empire it was known as Kaicarewn (Caesarea), and was the Metropolis (capital) of the late Roman province Cilicia Secunda. It was the home of the poet Oppian. Rebuilt by the Byzantine emperor Justin I after an earthquake in the 6th century, it became Justinopolis (525); but the old native name persisted, and when Thoros I, king of Lesser Armenia, made it his capital early in the 12th century, it was known as Anazarva.
RP92398. Bronze AE 35, Ziegler 346 (Vs1/Rs6), SNG Levante 1414 var. (rev. leg. arrangement), SNG BnF 2054 var. (same), SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, aF, rough, edge cracks, weight 23.1 g, maximum diameter 35.2 mm, die axis 0o, Anazarbus (Anavarza, Turkey) mint, 217 A.D.; obverse AYT K M OΠ CEY MAKPEINOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse KAIC TΩN ΠP ANAZ EN∆O-Σ MHTPO PΩM TP, Nike (Victory) advancing left, raising wreath in right hand, trophy of captured arms in left hand, ΓB (chairman of 3 provinces, holder of 2 neocorates) upper left, ETE - ΛC (year 235 of Anazarbus) divided low across field, KEK (the meaning of these letters is unknown) lower left; rare; $41.22 (€37.92) ON RESERVE







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

IMPCMOPELSEVMACRINVSAVG
IMPCAESMOPELSEVMACRINVSAVG
MOPELSEVMACRINVSAVG


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calicó, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Clay, C. "The Roman Coinage of Macrinus and Diadumenian" in NZ 1979.
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 4, Septimius Severus to Maximinus Thrax. (Paris, 1884).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. IV: From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 5: Pertinax to Elagabalus. (London, 1950).
Online Coins of the Roman Empire (OCRE) http://numismatics.org/ocre/
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III, Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & Sear, D. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. III, Pertinax to Balbinus and Pupienus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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