Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Numismatics ▸ Barbaric & ImitativeView Options:  |  |  |   

Barbaric and Imitative Coins

Bulgaria, Second Empire, Early 14th Century A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The Second Bulgarian Empire, 1185 - 1396, reached its peak under Tsars Kaloyan and Ivan Asen II and was the dominant power in the Balkans until 1256. Bulgaria defeated the Byzantine Empire in several major battles. In 1205, Kaloyan defeated the newly established Latin Empire in the Battle of Adrianople. Ivan Asen II defeated the Despotate of Epiros and made Bulgaria a regional power. Bulgaria spread from the Adriatic to the Black Sea and the economy flourished. Tarnovo, the capitol, was considered a "New Constantinople" and became the cultural hub and the center of the Eastern Orthodox world. In the late 13th century, however, the Empire declined under constant invasions by Mongols, Byzantines, Hungarians, and Serbs, as well as internal unrest and revolts. The 14th century saw a temporary recovery and stability, the "Second Golden Age of Bulgarian culture," when literature and art flourished. This was also, however, a period of Balkan feudalism as central authorities gradually lost power in many regions. Bulgaria was divided into three parts before gradually being conquered by the Ottomans in the late 14th and early 15th centuries.
ME85965. Silver gros, Imitative of a Venetian grosso of Giovanni Dandolo (1280-1289); Radushev-Zhekov Type 1.17.1, Youroukova-Penchev 160, Dochev , gVF, well centered, weight 1.232 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain mint, early 14th century A.D.; obverse nimbate Christ Pantokrator enthroned facing, holding gospels in lap, IC - XC (Greek abbreviation: Iισους Xριστος - Jesus Christ) flanking Christ's head; reverse Doge, standing on left, receiving tall flag from St. Mark, standing on right, DVX down flag staff; very rare; $280.00 (238.00)


Kingdom of Gepidia, c. 493 - 518 A.D., In the Name of Anastasius

Click for a larger photo
Long attributed to the Ostrogoths, Metlich corrected attribution of this type to Gepidia. The Gepids were an East Germanic tribe, closely related to the Goths, first recorded in the 6th-century as having been allied with Goths invading Dacia in c. 260. In the 4th century, they were under the hegemony of the Hunnic Empire. Under King Ardaric, the Gepids united with other Germanic tribes and defeated the Huns at the Battle of Nedao in 454. The Gepids then founded the Kingdom of Gepidia, which reached its zenith of power after 537, settling around Singidunum (today's Belgrade). For a short time, Sirmium (today's Sremska Mitrovica) was the center of the Gepid State. In 552 the Gepids suffered a disastrous defeat to Alboin, king of the Lombards, after which Alboin had a drinking cup made from the skull of the Gepid King Cunimund. Remnants of the Gepids were conquered by the Avars later in the 6th century. Erythrai_amphitheater

BZ86482. Silver quarter siliqua, Hahn MIB I 46 (Theoderic), Kraus 63 - 64 (Theoderic), BMC Vandals ?, MEC I ?, Metlich ?, VF, well centered and struck on a broad flan, toned, light marks, small edge crack, weight 0.885 g, maximum diameter 13.8 mm, die axis 180o, Sirmium (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia) mint, c. 493 - 518 A.D.; obverse D N ANASTASIVS P P AVC (Byzantine Emperor Anastasius, 11 Apr 491 - 1 Jul 518), pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse INVIT-A ROMA D M, (monogram of Ostrogothic King Theoderic, 454 - 30 Aug 526), cross above and star below, both dividing legend; $250.00 (212.50)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The S - P reverse marks were used in 293. This obverse legend was used only until 291 and the portrait style is only correct for coins up to 292. The reverse legend should read COMES AVG. Although the style is equivalent to official issues, this coin is probably an unofficial imitative.
RA73280. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 447 (R), Webb Carausius 496, Hunter IV -, SRCV IV -, Bourne Carausius -, Linchmere -, Burton Latimer -, Bicester -, Carausian Hoard -, aVF, centered, corrosion, most of the reverse legend unstruck or obliterated, weight 5.637 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 0o, unmarked or unofficial mint, c. 293 A.D.; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse COMIS AVG (companion of the Emperor), Victory standing left, raising wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, S - P flanking across field (just a trace of the P remaining), nothing (or pellet?) in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; $175.00 (148.75)


Normans, Southern Italy, Anonymous, Dukes of Apulia or Counts of Sicily & Calabria, c. 1060 - 1080 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This coin is certainly imitative, as it weighs less then 1/3 the weight of the even the lightest official Class B Byzantine anonymous follis Forum has handled. Attribution to the Normans in Italy is based on the reputed find location and some similarity to other Byzantine imitatives issued by the Normans in Southern Italy and Sicily.
ME73353. Bronze follaro, apparently unpublished, imitative of Class B Byzantine anonymous follis (SBCV 1823, Constantinople, 1028 - 1041); MEC Italy III -, MIR -, et al. -, F, weight 2.163 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain Italian mint, c. 1060 - 1080 A.D.; obverse facing bust of Christ, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium, and colobium, holding book of Gospels; reverse IS - XS / bAS-ILE / bAS-ILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings, mostly off flan), Cross on three steps, dividing legend; from a California collector; $170.00 (144.50)


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy IX, c. 116 - 80 B.C., Ancient Counterfeit or Imitative

Click for a larger photo
This is an unusual counterfeit or imitative with a Cypriot style portrait of Zeus Ammon. The central "dimples" are skeuomorphs, actually cut into the dies to imitate the central "dimple" on official coins. On the official coins the center "dimple" resulted from a production process and was not a feature of the dies.
GP86872. Bronze AE 22, cf. Svoronos 1698 (official Ptolemaic mint issue), EF, style quite similar to official issues, remnant of pre-strike casting sprues, slightly rough, weight 5.167 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 0o, unofficial mint, c. 116 - 80 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (blundered), two eagles standing left, side by side, on thunderbolts, cornucopia left; $140.00 (119.00)


Roman Republic, c. 169 - 91 B.C., Unofficial Issue

Click for a larger photo
Crawford notes, "The very common quadrantes with M and N (as Milan 351) are clearly unofficial."
RR79715. Copper quadrans, cf. Milan 351 (from Crawford appendix p. 309 unofficial issues of bronze coins), Sydenham -, VF, centered on a tight flan, light marks,, weight 4.182 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 135o, unofficial mint, c. 169 - 91 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow right, ROMA below, three pellets before, M above; ex FORVM (2006), ex Goodman collection; $140.00 (119.00)


Normans, Southern Italy, Anonymous, Dukes of Apulia or Counts of Sicily & Calabria, c. 1081 - 1087 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This coin is certainly imitative, as it weighs about 1/3 the normal weight of an official Class J Byzantine anonymous follis. Attribution to the Normans in Italy is based on the reputed find location and some similarity to other Byzantine imitatives issued by the Normans in Southern Italy and Sicily.
ME68381. Bronze follaro, apparently unpublished, imitative of Byzantine class J follis (SBCV 1900, Constantinople, 1081 - 1118); MEC Italy III -, Biaggi -, Wroth Western -, aF, on a very small thin flan compared to Byzantine proto-types, weight 2.200 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain S. Italy mint, c. 1081 - 1087 A.D.; obverse bust of Christ facing, cross behind, wears pallium and colbium, raising right in benediction, Gospels in left, crescents above, IC - XC flanking; reverse Cross with globule and two pellets at each extremity, large crescent below, four globules around each surrounded by pellets; from an American collection; very rare; $110.00 (93.50)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The quantity of PAX coinage issued by Carausius probably exceeded the entire output of all his other types combined. The type was an appeal by the usurper Carausius for peace with the "official" emperors. Diocletian and Maximian did not recognize Carausius as emperor, nor did they reciprocate his desire for peace.
RA73491. Billon antoninianus, cf. King Unmarked 31; Burton Latimer 59; Croydon Hoard 63 (...P F AVG); Webb Carausius 128 (same); Bicester Hoard -, F, green patina, edge chip, weight 2.934 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 180o, unofficial mint, obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse PAX AV (or similar, blundered), Pax(?) standing, raising branch(?) in right hand, anchor(?) in left hand, no control or mintmarks; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; $95.00 (80.75)


Thracian or Germanic Tribes, Pseudo-Imperial Coinage, Mid 4th - Early 5th Century A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This type was minted by and used as currency by tribes outside the Roman Empire in Thrace. It copied a Roman votive type issued under Constantine the Great. The inscriptions are made up of illiterate imitations of letters.
CE76987. Bronze AE 18, Imitative of Crispus types, for prototypes see RIC VII p. 379 ff. (official Roman, Ticinum mint, c. 320 - 325 A.D.), Choice VF, nice green patina, weight 2.047 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, tribal mint, mid 4th - early 5th century A.D.; obverse laureate bust left, illiterate blundered imitation of a legend; reverse blundered VOT X within wreath, illiterate blundered limitation of a legend around, ST in exergue; $90.00 (76.50)


Crusaders(?), Imitative of Zangids of Syria, c. 1146 - 1200 A.D.,

Click for a larger photo
This coin is a crude imitative of an Islamic fals of the Zangids of Syria, Nur al-Din Mahmud, struck at Halab (Aleppo, Syria), 1146 - 1173 (Spengler-Sayles 73, Album 1850). That type was itself also imitative, copying a Byzantine follis of Constantine X, struck at Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey), 1059 - 1067 (DOC III 8, SBCV 1853). The quality of the Zangids fals vary greatly and it can be difficult to distinguish between Halab mint issues and imitatives. This example is very crude and if any can be attributed to the crusaders, this is one.
BZ77974. Bronze follis, Malloy Crusaders -; cf. Spengler-Sayles 73 (notes "barbaric" imitations), Album 1850 (notes imitations are perhaps struck by the Crusaders), F, desert patina, tight flan, weight 2.798 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain mint, c. 1150 - 1200 A.D.; obverse two Byzantine style imperial figures (Constantine X and Eudocia) standing facing, supporting between them labarum resting on three steps, EX downward on left, imitation of Kufic legend inner left; reverse Christ standing facing, nimbate, book of Gospels in left hand, right hand on hip, IC - XC flanking head, blundered imitation of legend around; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $90.00 (76.50)




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


REFERENCES

Album, S. Checklist of Islamic Coins. (Santa Rosa, CA, 1998).
Album, S. & T. Goodwin. Sylloge of Islamic Coins in the Ashmolean Museum, Vol. 1, The Pre-Reform Coinage of the Early Islamic Period. (Oxford, 2002).
Bellinger, A. & P. Grierson, eds. Catalogue of the Byzantine Coins in the Dumbarton Oaks Collection and in the Whittemore Collection. (Washington D.C., 1966 - 1999).
Campbell, W. Greek and Roman Plated Coins. ANSNNM 75. (New York, 1933).
Davis, P. "Dacian and Celtic Imitations of Republican Denarii" in The Celator 18-4, April 2004, pp. 6-16.
Davis, P. "Dacian Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii" in Apvlvm XLIII/1. (2006).
Davis, P. Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii, website: http://rrimitations.ancients.info/.
Davis, P. & E. Paunov. "Imitations of Republican Denarii from Moesia and Thrace" in Studies Prokopov. (2012).
Foss, C. Arab-Byzantine Coins: An Introduction, with a Catalogue of the Dumbarton Oaks Collection. (Harvard University Press, 2008).
Goodwin, T. Arab-Byzantine Coinage. Studies in the Khalili Collection. (London, 2005).
Hahn, W. Moneta Imperii Byzantini. (Vienna, 1973-81).
Hendy, M. Coinage and Money in the Byzantine Empire 1081-1261. (Washington D.C., 1969).
Hennequin, G. Catalogue des monnaies musulmanes de la Bibliotheque Nationale. (Paris, 1985).
Malloy, A., I. Preston, & A. Seltman. Coins of the Crusader States. (New York, 2004).
Metcalf, D. Coinage of the Crusaders and the Latin East in the Ashmolean Museum Oxford. (London, 1995).
Mitchiner, M. Oriental Coins and Their Values Vol. One : The World of Islam. (London, 1977).
Ranieri, E. La monetazione di Ravenna antica dal V all' VIII secolo: impero romano e bizantino, regno ostrogoto e langobardo. (Bologna, 2006).
Ratto, R. Monnaies Byzantines et d'autre Pays contemporaines l'poque byzantine. (Lugano, 1930).
Sear, D. Byzantine Coins and Their Values. (London, 1987).
Southerland, C. "'Carausius II', 'Censeris', and the Barbarous Fel. Temp. Reparatio Overstrikes" in NC 1945.
Spengler, W. & W. Sayles. Turkoman Figural Bronze Coins and Their Iconography. (Lodi, 1992).
Tolstoi, I. Monnaies byzantines. (St. Petersburg, 1913 - 14).
Vasic, M. "A IVth and Vth Centuries Hoard of Roman coins and imitations in the collection of the National Museum in Belgrade" in Sirmium VIII, p. 128-129, 6-19.
Walker, J. A Catalogue of the Muhammadan Coins in The British Museum. Vol. 2: A Catalogue of the Arab-Byzantine and Post-Reform Umaiyad Coins. (London, 1956).
Wroth, W. Catalogue of the Coins of the Vandals, Ostrogoths, Lombards and of the Empires of Thessalonica, Nicaea, and Trebizond in the British Museum. (London, 1911).
Wroth, W. Catalogue of the Imperial Byzantine Coins in the British Museum. (London, 1908).

Catalog current as of Sunday, May 27, 2018.
Page created in 1.141 seconds.
Barbaric and Imitative